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John Paul Jones - Zooma CD (album) cover

ZOOMA

John Paul Jones

 

Heavy Prog

3.64 | 38 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer
4 stars 4.5 stars. John Paul Jones' second album "Zooma" released in 1999 blows away anything that either Plant or Page have done post LED ZEPPELIN. This is very powerful music with thunderous bass from Jones who usually uses his 10 or 12 string bass on here. Jones thanks Robert Fripp in the liner notes, Fripp would guest on Jones' followup "Thunderthief" released in 2001. I am a huge fan of this style of music and to hear this kind of bass playing from the former ZEPPELIN member makes me both happy and sad. Happy that he's showing the world how amazing he is, and that I own this record, and sad that his playing wasn't more prominant with his former band. I could just imagine him playing bass like this with the mighty ZEP.

"Zooma" is the perfect opener and is best played extremlely loud. It opens with the sound of sea gulls and waves, but don't be fooled because there is a storm coming like nothing you've ever experienced. Haha. Jones comes in on his 10 string bass and shakes the foundations. Oh my ! Talk about the bass from hell ! The drums are heavy and we get this sick guitar solo later. Some strange sounds from an instrument called a kyma that fits the mood perfectly. Monster track. "Grind" opens with an amazing melody that sounds so good. Some massive bass comes and goes. Jones has his 12 string bass out for this one and he's making sounds that are coming from the depths. There's a brief conversation part way through.Trey Gunn follows that up with a touch guitar solo as the drums pound and the bass shakes the windows. "The Smile Of Your Shadow" is mellow with mandola, bass and something called a djembe. Drums and a fuller sound before 3 1/2 minutes before it settles back down.

"Goose" sounds incredible when it kicks into gear around 40 seconds in. Killer bass as usual. Fantastic rhythm.You have to hear this guy's bass man. A 12 string bass that should come with a warning label. A wall of sound after 4 minutes then it calms down until it ends. "Bass n' Drums" is simply that, but it's not as powerful as most of the songs. "B.Fingers" hits the ground running, no it digs up the ground actually. A deep and powerful onslaught from hell. Trey Gunn's back with his touch guitar but the bass and drums are eating him up. Great song ! "Snake Eyes" opens with deep, deep bass sounds as drums and some steel bass. There's a blues vibe to this one early and Jones treats us with an organ solo too before 3 minutes. Nice. Later we get some orchestration from the London Symphony Orchestra which is a nice touch. Check out the organ that's still ripping it up. Incredible ! One of the best tracks on here.

"Nosumi Blues" is another blues flavoured track with the bass lap steel guitar. Man can Jones play guitar or what ? Bass and drums 2 1/2 minutes in. "Tidal" brings us back to the 10 string bass as drums pound. This is tight man. Heavy duty too. The bass lap steel makes some noise 2 minutes in as it turns into absolute chaos.

This is so close to 5 stars for me. 7 of these tracks will rip your face off the other 2 I think are to show he's human. He can't fool me though.

Mellotron Storm | 4/5 |

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