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Children of Nova - The Complexity of Light CD (album) cover

THE COMPLEXITY OF LIGHT

Children of Nova

 

Neo-Prog

4.05 | 45 ratings

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progrockcritic
4 stars Is Children of Nova a rock band that discovered metal alone was not enough to satisfy the musical expression and then pushed their music into post-modern Neo-progressive rock? Arcaedion is an excellent representation of a unique, refreshing blend of metal/prog/power rock. Strong vocals, melodic metal progression, power rock guitar riffs, with seamless transitions into symphonic synthesized movements are all evident on this disc, and to excellent result.

Their digitally self-released Complexity of Light has great hooks, wonderful harmonies, with acid-psychedelic guitars that set the mood, and Squire-like bass riffs that simply excel. The drums complement well, but appear to be tuned high. The music suffers as a result; the overall recording of the drum set is the weakest part of this album.

Children of Nova's lead vocalist, TEO, has great range, with a very strong, elegant falsetto. There is always the concern that a falsetto vocal cannot be sustained in later years, once the detrimental effects of performing and advancing age weakens the vocalist's depth and range. Children of Nova should be careful not to fall into that trap and consider allowing guest female vocalists to contribute on future projects. As always, you are physically bound to the music you record.

"Arceadia" may be the best song on the album. This song has a strong chorus, excellent drumming and bottom, with an exceptional bass guitar performance. But again it is the lead guitar that sets the song apart with an almost discordant shred and disparate edge that flies above the music or slices straight through it like a ginzu knife. The only drawback to the song is that it is too short! There is a nice transition into "Fall of Aphonia" where a symphonic progression transitions into a ragged guitar riff that takes this song to a metal edge that blurs the mind. Is this the same song that began with such serenity?

"Second Sight Blackout" begins in a floydian/tangerine dream movement transitioning into a balladic melody that highlights very strong harmonies. Before you can settle down, the metal returns and this time the progression is predictable and slightly disappointing. The band sometimes relies on a style of sustained vocal harmony (hiding the lack of a strong a melody). It is a Nickelback trick, and in excess can be grating. For more than half of this song, this style of vocal depresses the music. But the ending is strong and the segway into "The Order" is beautifully accomplished.

"The Order " is a fine example of the expansive depth of possibilities for Children of Nova's music. The lyrics explore a worn-out concept, however. It is these contrasts between musical excellence and lyrical or melodic-harmonic adequacy that this potentially dominant band will need to resolve in their next release.

The album closes with the song "We Collide" which, amazingly, reminded this critic of the first release from Evanescence. This is one of the strongest songs on the disc, with soaring vocals, intense guitar, and powerful transitions. Despite the minor flaws, Children of Nova have created an excellent album that will stay on this critic's itunes for a long time.

progrockcritic | 4/5 |

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