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Rain - Cerulean Blue CD (album) cover

CERULEAN BLUE

Rain

 

Symphonic Prog

3.59 | 51 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Epignosis
Special Collaborator
Eclectic Prog Team
3 stars Cerulean Blue is one of the more depressing albums one might hear. Despite the lengthy track times, I do not consider this progressive rock. Most of the songs tread along at more or less the same pace and do so with few modifications. In terms of instrumentation, the album is more akin to New Age music than symphonic rock. The lyrics are impressive, if inscrutable. Perhaps the overall project is indulgent, but I do not fault it for that- it is a whimsical, if sad, journey. Cerulean Blue is a hypnotically beautiful experience, if somewhat burdened by its own sedateness.

"The Lammas Lands" After an airplane passes, bittersweet strings enter and the narrator speaks. Sparse, mournful music with piano serves as a thin foundation for the lovely singing of mystifying words. The music builds appropriately and gradually, developing passion. I am reminded of Kate Bush on Hounds of Love.

"Parsifal" Following more strings and narration, deep, resonant saxophone ushers in a cold choir. A passage during the second half of the song is somewhat heavier, with organ, louder drums, and a jazzy saxophone. The repeated last two lines are hauntingly enigmatic.

"Starcrossed" The narrator describes a skeptical encounter with a suicidal cult. The music is bright and acoustic guitar-based. It's a brighter song with some Near Eastern flavor.

"The Silver Apples of the Moon" The narration here is incredibly chilling, especially with the woman. The pedant in me wishes to point out that "the pursuit of happiness" is not in the Constitution- it's in the Declaration of Independence. The music here begins on twelve-string acoustic guitar and piano- very shimmering. However, the vocals are dull and spiritless for me. The fiercest part of the piece seems to invoke Eloy before becoming calm and gentle.

"Light and Magic" This piece opens with strings and narration. The song proper is like light jazz with an easygoing groove but a Mike Oldfield-like synthetic background that doesn't seem to fit the rhythm. To me, the overall song sounds like Radiohead- laidback, mournful, and mysterious. An amazing saxophone solo punches through the airy music- an unexpected treat.

"Jerusalem" The narration tells a sad story of a man selling the secrets of life for a dollar. I am reminded of The Final Cut from Pink Floyd, particularly "When the Tigers Broke Free." The singer this time around sounds like Andy Tillison of The Tangent. A bagpipe solo (which could have proved more triumphant) concludes the song.

"Cerulean Blue" The final piece consists of a mournful, Alaskan goodbye with strings playing what may as well be funeral music.

Epignosis | 3/5 |

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