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Uriah Heep - Very 'eavy...Very 'umble CD (album) cover

VERY 'EAVY...VERY 'UMBLE

Uriah Heep

 

Heavy Prog

3.31 | 303 ratings

From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Muzikman
Prog Reviewer
3 stars Even though this was Uriah Heep in their embryonic stage, they were light years ahead of their peers. ...Very 'Eavy...Very 'Umble was their very first album released back in 1970, when metal giants such as Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath were pounding their way into our consciousness, or making us unconscious, as many adults would be complaining about on a regular basis. This is one group that wasn't the critics' darlings. They had as much to do with the formation of metal and progressive rock as any of the groups that were on more favorable terms with the press.

In 2001 Sanctuary Records, with the cooperation of Castle Music UK, remastered and released several of the albums from the UH catalog. For a freshman release this album stands firm as an original rock classic to this day. It was a strong showing for the group. The rocker "Gypsy" kick starts the proceedings as Ken Hensley's swirling and driving organ sets the pace. Hensley was originally a guitar player and he plays some slide on this cut. He also provides the insightful liner notes (that are written so small one needs a magnifying glass to read them).

David Bryon (vocals) and Mick Box (guitar), Paul Newton (bass), and Ollie Olsson (drums) are the rest of the impressive performers in a lineup that was destined to change. Box's guitar was always right out front wailing away to compliment Hensley's powerful and sweeping organ playing. Box was no doubt one of the premier lead guitar players of the day, and he would carry the torch for many years to come. "Dreammare" is an extraordinary prog-rocker that serves as a wake up call that this band meant business. The fans new how great they were, although the critics foolishly gave them the brush off.

Three bonus tracks are added to this import. "Come Away Melinda," which was recently released again as a single by the present day UH. I heard it for the first time on Two Sides Of Uriah Heep: Electrically and Acoustically Driven. I thought it was a bit too fluffy, but this version I enjoyed much more, there are no strings added and it has more depth and feeling. "Gypsy," the single version, and a rarity called "Born In A Trunk" round out the added bonus tracks. The original artwork is intact, with the album inner sleeve replicated as well; hence the two sides of the LP are listed without the bonus tracks. The sound is fantastic on this CD; it doesn't get much better than this.

Its time to get 'umble and check out this critical piece of progressive-metal history. Yes, this is very very 'eavy.

Muzikman | 3/5 |

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