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Kaipa - Nattdjurstid  CD (album) cover

NATTDJURSTID

Kaipa

 

Symphonic Prog

1.80 | 44 ratings

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Anthony H.
Prog Reviewer
1 stars Kaipa: Nattdjurstid [1982]

Rating: 2/10

Nattdjurstid is the fifth studio album from Swedish progressive-rock band Kaipa. Any album from a 70s prog-rock band released in 1982 is automatically suspect. Needless to say, the 80s weren't exactly a fortuitous period for progressive music. Changing musical trends hit prog artists the hardest of all, and Kaipa is no exception. Hander was the band's first venture into commercialism, featuring tired synthpop themes and dry 4/4 beats. However, the band still managed to cling to a slight sense of creativity on that release. Unfortunately, the mediocrity of Hander goes even further south on this follow-up. By this point, Kaipa had abandoned all hope of musical creativity. Nattdjurstid is an incalculably lame collection of trite new-wave tunes with absolutely no soul whatsoever. Bland synthpop sensibilities, mediocre musicianship, and unbelievably lazy songwriting all combine to create this absolute lemon of an album.

"Galen" opens the album with an atrocious dance beat and grating vocals. The title track is the least-bad thing here, but that isn't saying much. The bass-line is catchy, but the awful beats and absurd anthem vocals quickly ruin everything. The insipid power-pop lunacy of "Timmar Av Glas" doesn't even deserve my comment. "Zepapo" is a funky piece that attempts to add variety to the album, but fails miserably. "Identitetkris" is a textbook synth instrumental that you have already heard hundreds of times before. "Inom Oss" features a ridiculous synthesized percussion noise that sounds like a built-in sound effect on a ten-dollar keyboard. "Speglarna" is a synthpop anthem with soulless vocals and tired beats. "Narmare" means "closer" in Swedish, but I wish that this track would go further away instead. "Vantar En Storm" ends the album with the same uninspired dullness that preceded it.

Everything went pear-shaped for Kaipa after this stinker, and it's not hard to understand why. The commercial success that the band was so clearly striving for failed to transpire, so Hans Lundin disbanded the group for nearly two decades. I can sympathize; the man's heart clearly wasn't connected to this style at all. This lack of connection is painfully obvious. Even for synthpop, Nattdjurstid is a downright poor piece of work. This embarrassing piece of dance pop should be avoided at all costs. Fortunately, Kaipa's 21st-century reunion has yielded some great music. That's my only consolation while listening to this refuse.

Anthony H. | 1/5 |

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