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Amarok - Hero CD (album) cover

HERO

Amarok

Crossover Prog


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5 stars Amarok is releasing their 6th album. Michal Wojtas debuted in 1999, he played the piano fan of JM Jarre, then took to the guitar loving Mike Oldfield and Pink Floyd. An innovative fusion of styles starting from ambient, folk prog, eclectic post rock, hypnotic space rock, all embellished with an aerial Knopfler guitar at times and unusual instruments such as the violin, the theremin , the wind gong, the djembe, the harmonium, the flute and the rain sticks. Gazpacho and Riverside are often thought of while listening to them. History, potential human survival as a covid backdrop when you hold us!

"It's Not the End" begins electro Ó la Duda, well they know each other it's no coincidence, floydian hints, fresh air that makes you leap, jump for joy; it's sweet, graceful almost pop post; female voice over starting on a tortured, rhythmic, modern instrumental where the guitar solo can recall the sonic drifts of Rutten of the Gathering. 'Surreal'brit electro pop at the start, supercharged rock-pop synth, a post-Sigur Ros guitar that thrills you; Michal sinks his voice into the captivating, haunting tune between a Lunatic Soul, a Suburban Savages and a Leprous. '' Hail! Hail! Al '' sinks ... the sound with a trip-hop scale evident here, rhythmic, monolithic trance struck by a depressive violin for a while, more gypsy folk later; a bit of Howie B for that ethereal feel and of The Orb for their work with Gilmour; precisely "The Orb" arrives and denotes, synthetic rhyme, romantic ballad with overflowing spleen; moment of musical contemplation with a voice associated with the piano all flowing as if from a spring; a theremin has to hide somewhere and vibrate the air leading to introspection. "The Dark Parade" continues its momentum and manages to combine tribal, reverberating rhythms a la Brendan Perry, a sound of Mariusz Duda and decadent new wave tones of Killing Joke or The Cure; a magnificent musical malmstr÷m with a final crescendo for an intoxicating dark atmosphere. '' Hero' for the most intimate piece, quiet rhythm, syncopated by the drums, slide guitar filled with emotion; modern sounding title that flows naturally, atmospheric; a last solo with torn notes that sends up there; beauty is at this price. Spatial, austere "What You Sow", the 2001 monolith has landed and exudes this air from behind Jupiter, ideal for putting on your diving suit and taking a deep breath of what little air remains in space; restful, as raw as an aria by Ray Linch, staged as the Anathema did so well, a sublime intimate piece. Note a title on vinyl Subconsciousness.

Amarok wants to bring us to a form of inner peace, to a moment of musical serenity; the sounds are based on the synths which allow to get out of anxious climates and on the guitar which gives access to musical peace. A sumptuous sound apart, embellished with dark and divine climates, far from any current sound movement; progressive rock is not the end of its revolution, it is perfected with this group where the exotic musical fusion sends very far. The year is not over but has just fulfilled one of my top potentials.

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Posted Saturday, October 30, 2021 | Review Permalink

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