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SCULPTURE

BaK

Experimental/Post Metal


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BaK Sculpture album cover
4.13 | 17 ratings | 2 reviews | 47% 5 stars

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Studio Album, released in 2010

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. The Search (2:38)
2. Why (3:45)
3. Can't Understand (7:44)
4. Not Just Your World (7:34)
5. Kali (3:38)
6. Pay (4:22)
7. Our Time (9:11)
8. Garuda (2:33)
9. Sands Of Time (5:39)
10. The Lament Of Curtain Von Schnauzer (6:42)

Total Time 53:46

Lyrics

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Music tabs (tablatures)

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Line-up / Musicians

- Beau / guitar, bass, bağlama
- Kit / drums, percussion, keyboards, piano

Releases information

Released: April, 2010

Thanks to Rune2000 for the addition
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BAK Sculpture ratings distribution


4.13
(17 ratings)
Essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music(47%)
47%
Excellent addition to any prog rock music collection(47%)
47%
Good, but non-essential (6%)
6%
Collectors/fans only (0%)
0%
Poor. Only for completionists (0%)
0%

BAK Sculpture reviews


Showing all collaborators reviews and last reviews preview | Show all reviews/ratings

Collaborators/Experts Reviews

Review by Rune2000
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR Prog Metal Team
4 stars BaK is what you get when you try to combine Middle Eastern and orchestral sounds together with arrangements of a traditional metal band. I've actually never been a big fan of this combination with the two Orphaned Land albums being my prime connection with the style. But unlike the Middle Eastern bands who incorporate sounds of the traditional metal into their style, BaK is (from what I can tell) actually an Australian act who does the reverse of just that. Whether this is something that would appeal more to the western audience is of course debatable but I personally found it a bit easier to get into the groove of this release.

Another interesting fact is that I've been listening to this album for almost three month now and I'm still discovering new details in it's sound that I was completely oblivious to in the early days. Some small snippet here and there is one thing but when I completely managed to ignore the underlying keyboard arrangements is quite weird. Just like the best film scores are the ones that conveniently place themselves in the background in order to make the audience concentrate their attention on the movie in front of them, there is clearly an intention behind this layering technique that BaK so adequately have demonstrated.

If I had to mention anything that I found less appealing then it would be the lack of a total dedication of the band to their style. Yes, the instruments are all in place and sound appropriate enough, but somehow I still can't get past the feeling that the whole oriental sound is merely a gimmick from the collective. I might of course be proven wrong after BaK starts releasing one studio album after the other where they enhance their sound even more. Other than that I really can't think of any other criticism regarding this release, making it easily one of the most ambitious debuts of the decade! Having said that I just realized that I know practically nothing about this mysterious Australian act so, for all I know, it could be comprised of a supergroup formation featuring members from many established bands. But that's just my bitter speculation considering the high quality of the music and production of this release!

BaK have certainly sculptured an excellent debut that the band can be proud of for years to come. If anything, I would be amazed if the collective can recreate the same quality on their future releases, but that is left to be seen. As for now, I highly recommend Sculpture to fans of eclectic metal music or anyone who is tired of the regular metal scene and is looking for new engaging music to sink their teeth into!

***** star songs: Why (3:45) Our Time (9:11)

**** star songs: The Search (2:38) Can't Understand (7:44) Not Just Your World (7:34) Kali (3:38) Pay (4:22) Garuda (2:33) Sands Of Time (5:39) The Lament Of Curtain Von Schnauzer (6:42)

Review by siLLy puPPy
COLLABORATOR PSIKE Team
4 stars BAK is a duo from Sydney, Australia who released their first album SCULPTURE in 2011 and to date is only available as a digital release. The duo of Beau (guitar / bass / baglama) and Kit (drums / percussion / keys / piano) are the two members who write, compose and arrange the compositions. While the band like to tease about the meaning of their name suggesting that they could possibly have taken it from an ancient Egyptian sculptor or from a Holocaust survivor turned painter or even a metaphysical flower, i surmise that it is actually he first initials of Beau And Kit which when written properly would be seen as BaK seems more likely. The band is famous more for their live shows that can have 30 to 100 extra people on stage as they include large symphonic orchestras that cover strings, brass and woodwinds, operatic and choir vocals as well as Middle Eastern and Indian ethnic musicians presenting all kinds of percussive and stringed instruments.

On SCULPTURE this band excels at creating melodic Middle Eastern musical scales that add progressive metal to the mix. What we get is a nice melodically driven symphonic metal type of sound that focuses more on the folk instrumentation than metal most for the majority of the time but does allow the metal have its time in the sun as well. Some of the lead vocal parts on the album remind me of James Hetfield on Metallica's black album. There is a lot of attention paid toward two male vocalists harmonizing melody lines and backed up by all kinds of instrumental solos. The compositions are quite catchy with bellydance type grooves and percussive drum circles providing the backbone as the rhythm section while the vocals and symphonic touches deliver the hooks with the addition of an exotic ethnic flair. Some of the vocal trade offs can bring Andrew Lloyd Weber's works to mind as well.

While the metal elements are only one ingredient in this atmospheric ethnic smorgasbord, when it is allowed off its leash can deliver some nice heavy riffs and grooves. While the vocals mostly reside on the clean side, during some of the metal outbursts death growls are allowed to get down and dirty as well. This part reminds me a bit of Therion because the female operatic singers are harmonizing with the death growls and distorted metal riffs. There are even occasional rip roaring guitar solos but only when the energy is elevated to the point where some contrast is needed. This is a pretty cool album that is excellently executed with all the elements on board working quite well together. Anyone interested in the harder rock and metal bands like Secret Chiefs 3, Orphaned Land or Myrath who fuse Middle Eastern and Indian ethnic elements with metal will absolutely love this since BAK mix it all together perfectly and always keep the prospect of too many chefs in the kitchen from getting out of hand.

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