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SteveG View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 10 2015 at 18:46
Final Post:
 
It's time for me to get back to my professional life. I've enjoyed my visit to PA of almost a year and I'm glad, with the help of many, to leave a record of both American and British Psychedelic Rock, and to let members see the independent musical development that went on between the two, as well as their different agendas as far as being artistic, social or political statements.
 
 
 Revolver
This? Revolver from 1966.
 
 
I will close simply with this. Revolver by The Beatles is the legitimate starting point for British Psychedelic Rock that led to Progressive rock. The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is the legitimate starting point for garage band based Punk Rock. If you truly have an objective mind, you can decide which album had a greater impact on pop music history. Cheers and Farewell.
 
 
Psychedelic Sound
Or this? The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators from 1966.
 
 
 
 
And to all you psych fans, keep on posting!


Edited by SteveG - March 23 2015 at 11:26
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 11 2015 at 09:02
Excellent work, Steve.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 14 2015 at 09:58
Just a song before I go:
Thank You All Very Much
Endle St. Cloud: Thank You all Very Much from 1970.
 
Before I board a plane tomorrow into corporate anonymity, I have one last chance to post the last offering from the recorded Austin/Huston Texas based Psych groups. Endle St. Cloud was both the group leader's name and the group's name that produced this magnificent and cleaver proto Roxy Music styled gem that comes complete with smooth, suave, if somewhat neurotic at times, Bryan Ferry like vocals (shades of Talking Heads, too?) is an  adventure through the changing American mores of the late sixties while touching upon American music themes from Jazz,  Rhythm and Blues, Ragtime, Country Blues, Texas Swing along with nods to silent movie theme music (Rick Wakeman, did you steel something around 1970?), and even lounge music that is part pastiche and part authentic homage. This keyboard driven group was a complete head scratcher in 1970 and can only be appreciated in hindsight, with the existence of the afore mentioned artists that came later to use as a barometer.
 
Thank You All Very Much was the last album to be issued on the famous/infamous International Artists label before they inept business sense virtually bankrupt the label. This another class remaster from they Charlie label along with Lost and Found's one and only release from 1968 that nodded to Psych and Blues Rock  titled Everybody's Here and the near hit album by Bubble Puppy titled A Gathering of Promises, from 1969, which garnered a nationally charting hit with the song Hot Smoke and Sassafras.
 
The Texas Psych scene would fade away and give rise to the Cosmic Cowboy reign of Willie Nelson, et al,  from that time up till now.


Edited by SteveG - March 20 2015 at 16:23
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 22 2015 at 20:53
Shamefully, this thread has drifted to the second page. I'll resurrect it with a band and a single album (just one album, that's all you get!) that I don't think we've discussed yet -- and I waded through a few pages to see if we had:
 
 
What a fantastic album! And it contains what I consider to be one of the greatest psychedelic compositions ever created, "The American Metaphysical Circus" :
 
 
You don't even need hallucinogenics to get stoned listening to this album. The juxtaposition of various American vaudeville, 40s big band, Dixie, marching band and carnival calliope sounds amidst the mushrooming madness is quite ingenious, or perhaps a devilish slap in the face of conservative music themes.
 
 


Edited by The Dark Elf - March 23 2015 at 10:30
...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 22 2015 at 21:07
^ Excellent album.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 23 2015 at 11:02
I've come to this forum a little late but can see no mention of The Pretty Things. S.F. Sorrow the album and the two proceeding singles (both sides of each) surely define psychedelic. Drugs, sitar, backwards recording and the music sounds good still.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2015 at 02:13

The True - Let Me Love

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Turia Records is proud to reissue one of the hidden gems of Spanish music of all time. 
From the city of Elche (Alicante), The True billed late 60s this great work of art now completely untraceable. 
Three shoots Freak beat that we recovered like a tribute to a generation that completely changed the way we 
understand music; three songs in which you can see a strong battery and distorted guitar with fuzztone. 
The Freak Beat Rock is a style that has an intermediate sound between the sound Mod and Progressive Rock, 
and who practiced bands like The Who and The Kinks, to name a few. 
The sound is cleaned and mastered, but respecting the original spirit, is performed on 7 "and in a limited 
and very careful editing.

 

released 22 March 2015 

- Hernán de la Torre - Guitar, Lead vocals 
- Toni "Toño" Santamaría - Bass guitar, backing vocals 
- José "Pepote" Pinos - Drums


Edited by Svetonio - March 24 2015 at 02:13
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2015 at 13:08
^ Ummm...Svetty, I've never heard of "The True", but based on the description of the band and their sound (Kinks? Who?), it doesn't seem that putting them with psych rock is applicable. I know you like to display your mad cut-and-paste skills, but to what purpose here?
...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 02 2015 at 11:59

Eric Burdon and The Animals:

 

Winds of Change

 

 

Winds of Change 1967.

East meets West. When the original Animals' broke up in 1965, lead singer Eric Burdon relocated to sunny San Francisco and haunted other southern central LA areas where he became the defacto East meats West psychedelic conduit  for British styled Psychedelic rock  by releasing two counter culture albums that channeled some of the British Psych motifs back into the California Bay area which also found their way back into the Texas Psych rock scene in addition to the British Psych albums being played on either local radio or at private vinyl listening sessions.
 
Burdon's firs album 1067's Winds of Change celebrated American beat poetry form writers like Kerouac, of whom he became enormously enchanted with, as well a recording a tribute song to Hendrix's coming of social coming of age question that was a poor homage to Hendrix's song (and album) Are You Experienced?, in which Burdon tries to imitate Hendrix's vocal style but sadly comes off sounding much more like Bob Dylan.
 
However, Winds of Change was a counter culture hit as was it's more adventurous follow up, 1968's The Twain Shall Meet, whose hippie endorsements in which Burdon and his new Animals backing group tackle more overt social issues on the great album track, and edited single Sky Pilot, while the rest of the album goes into experimental psychedelic songs that feature both sitar along with a British military style march with bagpipes within the same song. This was probably the zenith  of Burdon's ambassador's role of the California's hippie turn on , tune in and drop out  evangelization of Haight Ashbury movement and, even though extremely dated, the album still holds a quiet charm even today.
 
Eric Burdon and The Animals.
Twain Shall Meet
 
The Twain Shall Meet 1968.


Edited by SteveG - April 02 2015 at 13:38
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 02 2015 at 15:50
www.zero-books.net/books/gathering-promises
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 02 2015 at 19:32
^Hello againWallace. You're right on schedule.
Perhaps your new book will better help you understand Psych rock and will stop you from just pretending that you know it's fundamentals.
Btw, the book I'm writing will be much more detailed then anything that you have read so far in the Psych Lounge or privately, but you will have to pay for that as well when it's published. And that statement extends to include Ben Graham's pedestrian text "A Gathering of Promises" which is named after a non psych Bubble Puppy album. Psych On!

Edited by SteveG - April 03 2015 at 09:29
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 02 2015 at 21:26
"From The 13th Floor Elevators to the Black Angels and Beyond"

N.P. :    the Beyond  lp  (on tape)
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 03 2015 at 05:36
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

^ Ummm...Svetty, I've never heard of "The True", but based on the description of the band and their sound (Kinks? Who?), it doesn't seem that putting them with psych rock is applicable. I know you like to display your mad cut-and-paste skills, but to what purpose here?
The True was played Freakbeat, and above metnioned The Who was released a few songs in that obscure 60s psychedelic sub-genre that was called Freakbeat at that time, e.g. I Can See For Miles and Armenia City In The Sky. That's why they are here.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 03 2015 at 07:46
We needs a Freakbeat thread.
Open up some eyes.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 04 2015 at 11:16
For the Elevator's fan that has everything:
 
The 13th Floor Elevators: Kingdom of Heaven-Live. Airline Records 2015.
 
 
This collection of great sounding "audience recordings" mainly from 1966 features songs that were featured on The Psychedelic Sounds Of...album and is probably more important for who listened to these recordings  (Patty Smith, Tom Verlaine et al) and how these "alternate recordings" influenced their music. The end of the disc moves into three 1967 Easter Everywhere era tracks that show the heavy edge the band was moving into before prominent band members Roky Erickson and Tommy Hall went AWOL. A treat!


Edited by SteveG - April 06 2015 at 15:05
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 04 2015 at 12:38
Ahh, easter eggs from Steve
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 05 2015 at 00:54
Quote If you face a „Jesus“ look-alike in a white robe with an acoustic guitar and a beard in full blossom on the cover of a record you know you’re on the trail of a real oddity, in whatever way it might be. Then you check the name and it says D.R. Hooker on the cover. Is it his name or is he a doctor who cures prostitutes, so called “hookers” ? What is this all about? With a bit of effort you may find out that this is the name of a musician from the Connecticut scene of the early 70s and that he gathered a bunch of willing hired guns around to back him up instrumentally. You will also be able to get the information that the original vinyl pressing in 1972 had only a limited run of 99 copies and is nowadays as rare as gold dust but there may have been reissues in the meantime. Well, if something like that gets reissued, it should have some kind of a fan base among collectors of 70s music and most of them go nuts for psychedelic, hardrock and progressive rock. So, can we say that this little obscurity with the utterly odd cover is some kind of the early 70s hardrock and psyche scene’s Holy Grail? There might be even more obscure records (like STONEWALL – Stoner) with print runs even lesser in size but D.R. HOOKER – The truth definitely belongs to the most iconic records in the field of US rock. Now we come to the actual musical quality of this item and despite a little rough and unpolished sound, the music is definitely intriguingly composed, well executed and backed with feelings of peace or passion, whatever song you get to listen to. The fervid opener “The sea” is one of the best examples what a brilliant composer Donald R. Hooker (there we go), singer / songwriter and hippie with a substance abuse history, really was. A pulsating rhythm made of regular drums and obsessively beaten percussions, held together by an ever pumping bass guitar, was the background for an epic, picturesque vocal melody riding on a guitar stampede with excessive leads. Next comes a gentle pop tune or a steaming funky rocker with an easy and relaxed vocal line or another quite progressively structured composition of crushing heaviness. No matter where the needle or the laser are in the groove, each note here is captivating and will inspire you down to the bare bones. Hard to compare this music but it ranges from pop psyche of the highest order in the vein of the STRAWBERRY ALARM CLOCK to powerful late 60s rock with a funky attitude as played by so many rockbands those days to thought provoking singer / songwriter tunes in the vein of Neil Young, Nick Drake or even Donovan Leitch with either lush or sparse arrangements. And there is way more than that. Haunting synthesizer lines on powerful guitars build an epic beginning for a fuzzed out, yet relaxed garage rocker that could be a lost outtake of a JEFFERSON AIRPLANE session with THE SEEDS. The whole album bears a homemade feeling and creates a very imaginative atmosphere. Next to the ten original tracks of “The truth” we get six of eight songs that were recorded in 1974 and been released about five years later as “Armageddon”. And all of these songs come in the same way as the ones on “The truth”. 60s psychedelia, dramatic pop, progressive power rock and great folky bits and pieces flow into each other. The result is music in full blossom, so colorful and thrilling that you will definitely give this album a heavy rotation on or in your music player.







http://psychedelic-sounds-international.bandcamp.com/album/d-r-hooker-the-truth-cd-1972-2015
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2015 at 10:25
Two more Easter eggs (albums) from 1968.  UK's The Small Faces' Ogden's Nut Gone Flake and the US's Country Joe and The Fish's I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-To-Die-Rag could not be more socially or culturally different from each other except for the fact that both albums resist the trend of adding Eastern instruments such as sitars,  or over the top recording tricks such as backwards and vari speeded tapes to their psychedelic sound mixes.
Ogdens Nut Gone Flake
Charly Records (UK) 2 CD Deluxe Remaster.
While "Fixin'-To-Die" starts off with the famous Fish Cheer (in it's clean original form) before seguing into the Vaudeville rag time romp of the album's title track before reverting into more of The Fishes by now well known blues tinged Psych rock, Ogden's Nut displays The Small Faces' Vaudeville rock fusion over the course of the entire album, with the misspoken song links of the album's second side connecting Happiness Stan with the four other hysterically, if not quite understood by Americans, second two songs.
 I Feel Like Im Fixin To Die
Verve Records (UK) 2 CD Deluxe Remaster.
 
 
 
Both albums were extremely well recorded for their eras and both of the CD remasters that are shown present these albums in audiophile sound as well as supplying rare stereo album masters (Fixin'-To- Die) or  alternate stereo song mixes for a possible stereo album presentation (Ogden's Nut).
 
This post is for Kevin (Lear'sFool) for peaking my interest again in The Small Faces, not only Ogden's Nut, but also in their other albums and single releases by The Small Faces and their proceeding incarnation The Faces.
 
A Happy Easter and Passover to all!
 
 Looks like I'll be heading to Japan and Asia for a few months. (I wonder what they celebrate?) Domo Arigato!


Edited by SteveG - April 06 2015 at 19:34
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2015 at 10:33
ex-Yugoslav 60s psych: Grupa 220






Quote Review by SeyoSPECIAL COLLABORATOR Honorary Collaborator
4 stars Debut album of Zagreb-based GRUPA 220 "Nasi dani" (eng. Our Days) belongs to the category of records about which one could say: "Even if it were released as an empty piece of vinyl without a sound, it would have still been historically important"! It was the first LP record released in Yugoslavia (late 1968) by a domestic label (Jugoton) and by a Yugoslav rock band (GRUPA 220), which at the time were called "vocal-instrumental combos" (local abbr. "VIS") or "beat ensembles" playing music influenced by the British invasion/rock'n'roll sound of the mid-1960s.

But "Nasi dani" was and still remains more than that. Unlike the fashion of the day when Yugoslav bands mostly played covers of international hits (in broken English or in translated versions) or instrumental surf rock of the Shadows, Drago Mlinarec and his group engaged in writing their own songs and thus manufacturing the first authentic, domestic rock hits in the local language like "Osmijeh" (eng. Smile) from 1967. This practice was groundbreaking and pioneering effort in ex-Yugoslavia and perhaps only INDEXI could match GRUPA 220 in that manner. Even politically significant for the period of Titoist "real socialism", this action showed to the Yugoslav establishment that "pop music" (as it was called those days) was not only an "American imperialist import" but also a global musical expression that could nicely fit into local cultures and produce quality.

Musically, this album sounds little bit like famous transitional albums of the BEATLES ("Rubber Soul", "Revolver") or Bob Dylan ("Highway 61", "Blonde on Blonde") with tiny elements of psychedelia impregnated in the songs, particularly the eerie Alan Price- like organ and wah-wahed guitar licks. The title track bookending the album invokes the quasi-classical organ melodies of PROCOL HARUM, while the most "progressive" is certainly 6-minute "Negdje postoji netko" (eng. There is Someone Somewhere) with a loose, hypnotic and jazzy arrangement. Strong eastern-tinged percussions and recorder solo played by Branimir Zivković reminded rock critic Zlatko Gall of some early TRAFFIC works when he wrote liner notes for 2000 CD reissue. This song would re-surface later on the namesake solo album by Mlinarec in 1977. The second songwriter in the band, guitarist/vocalist Vojko Sabolović, was more inclined towards straight pop melodies and danceable hits so three of his tracks somehow do not seem to merge well with Mlinarec's cynical and introspective "lonesome wolf" Dylanesque lyrics such as "Starac" (eng. The Old Man) and "Besciljni dani" (eng. Aimless Days).

Overall, do not expect much in terms of production, instrumental prowess or mammoth and complex song structures - it is too early for that! Remember, we are talking about 1968 and the closest we can relate this LP to prog rock is to say it might fit into the proto-prog category. But, the progress here lies in the form and in the historical/regional context, not in the vinyl grooves. This album represents the birthplace of Yugoslav (and hence Bosnian/Croatian/Macedonian/Montenegrin/Serbian/Slovene) long- playing discography of rock music and of many of its later subdivisions including progressive rock.



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 07 2015 at 11:03
Since Steve G mentioned Kraftwerk in his review of Neil Young's Trans, I figured I'd give them a nod here.



Lyrically, it's not psychedelic - just a lot of stuff about robots a la Fritz Lang's Metropolis and the later Blade Runner film. Musically, on the other hand, I think it very much qualifies. Especially with my favorite piece on the album, "Neon Lights", where the music captures the bright lights of a large city, one of the closer ways, IMO, of experiencing an acid trip without the acid. I love the synth tones on here, they're just otherworldly.
He looks at this world and wants it all... so he strikes, like Thunderball!
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