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    Posted: June 17 2016 at 15:55
Feel free to expand on the categories. I thought it might be interesting to see what people's favourites are from the country they reside in (or native country) -- co-productions that involve other countries are fine.

Me, CANADA. And I'm just doing one for now as I'm short on time (could add lots of films easily as I'm a fan of Cronenberg, Atom Egoyan and Don McKellar, and in TV, well there's LEXX....And in books, Mordechai Richler),

Book:

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (2003) (it's the first book in a trilogy)

Originally posted by amazon amazon wrote:

The narrator of Atwood's riveting novel calls himself Snowman. When the story opens, he is sleeping in a tree, wearing an old bedsheet, mourning the loss of his beloved Oryx and his best friend Crake, and slowly starving to death. He searches for supplies in a wasteland where insects proliferate and pigoons and wolvogs ravage the pleeblands, where ordinary people once lived, and the Compounds that sheltered the extraordinary. As he tries to piece together what has taken place, the narrative shifts to decades earlier. How did everything fall apart so quickly? Why is he left with nothing but his haunting memories? Alone except for the green-eyed Children of Crake, who think of him as a kind of monster, he explores the answers to these questions in the double journey he takes - into his own past, and back to Crake's high-tech bubble-dome, where the Paradice Project unfolded and the world came to grief.


Film:

Jesus of Montreal (1989) directed and written by Denys Arcand:

Originally posted by rotten tomatoes rotten tomatoes wrote:

A modern-day Passion Play becomes a reenactment of the life and death of Jesus Christ in more ways than one with this critically acclaimed drama from Quebec filmmaker Denys Arcand. Lothaire Bluteau stars as Daniel Coloumbe, an intense young actor in Montreal who is hired by church fathers to restage and update the city's annual Passion Play, which over the course of the past 40 years has begun to seem hidebound. Daniel hires a group of struggling young actors that become devoted to him and his creative vision as he devises an extremely avant-garde production that takes Christ's rebellious teachings literally. Revolving around set pieces reflecting passages from Christ's life rather than a traditional re-creation of events, Daniel's revisionist work also incorporates blasphemous ideas about his subject, questioning his true nature. Daniel's play is a critical smash and wows mesmerized audiences, but greatly disturbed church officials order the labor of love dismantled. Real life begins imitating biblical events as the actors become cast-outs and Daniel smashes up an audition in which the actress portraying his Mary Magdalene (Catherine Wilkening) is asked to disrobe by a prurient producer


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLfINF6ln4c

Television show:

The Newsroom (1996 and various other years), created by Ken Finkleman:

Originally posted by wikipedia wikipedia wrote:

The Newsroom is a Canadian television comedy-drama series which ran on CBC Television in the 1996–97, 2003–04 and 2004–05 seasons. A two-hour television movie, Escape from the Newsroom, was broadcast in 2002.

The show is set in the newsroom of a television station which is never officially named, but is generally understood to be based on the CBC itself. Inspired by American series The Larry Sanders Show[1] and similar to such earlier series as the British Drop the Dead Donkey and the Australian Frontline, the series mined a dark vein of comedy from the political machinations and the sheer incompetence of the people involved in producing City Hour, the station's nightly newscast...


Edited by Logan - March 07 2018 at 23:07
"The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit the views" (Doctor Who - The Face of Evil, Jan 22, 1977).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaldJean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 17 2016 at 17:18
books:

Thomas Mann - Dr. Faustus
Heinrich Mann - Der Untertan (title translated as "Man of Straw", "The Patrioteer" and "The Loyal Subject"; the latter is the most correct translation of the title)
Alfred Döblin - Berlin Alexanderplatz
Günter Grass - Das Treffen in Telgte ("The Meeting at Telgte"). I much prefer this little novel to "The Tin Drum"
Heinrich Heine - Deutschland. Ein Wintermärchen ("Germany. A Winter's Tale")

movies:

Volker Schlöndorff - "Die Blechtrommel" ("The Tin Drum")
Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau - "Nosferatu"
Fritz Lang - "M"
Rainer Werner Fassbinder- "Chinesisches Roulette"
Werner Herzog - "Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes" ("Aguirre, the Wrath of God")


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 17 2016 at 17:24
U.S. book a tough choice but I guess Norton Juster for The Phantom Tollbooth.  And of course Maurice Sendak for anything

Film probably JFK

TV show gotta be the original Star Trek , and Wild,Wild West a personal favorite.

I've got a thing for film & tv of the 50s and early 60s, probably because they were all in reruns when I was a kid and were so much better than anything new in the 70s & 80s.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vompatti Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 17 2016 at 18:43
Films:

Mikko Niskanen - Kahdeksan surmanluotia
Aki Kaurismäki - Likaiset kädet
Mika Kaurismäki - Arvottomat
Matti Ijäs - Katsastus
Erik Blomberg - Valkoinen peura
Risto Jarva - Työmiehen päiväkirja

Books:

Kalervo Palsa - Eläkeläinen muistelee
J. K. Ihalainen - Kuume
Pentti Saarikoski - Hämärän tanssit
Timo K. Mukka - Täältä jostakin
Väinö Kirstinä - Pitkän tähtäyksen LSD-suunnitelma
Kari Aronpuro - Aperitiff, avoin kaupunki

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 17 2016 at 19:23
Hope not quoting still renders this easy followable for browsers.

Jean: I like all of those films too, The Tin Drum and Aguirre... being particular favourite films of mine. I've liked many Herzog and Schlöndorff films. As for one of Schlöndorff's with English, I found his The Ogre featuring John Malkovitch excellent. As for the Gunther Grass Tin Drum novel, it's one of my favourite novels. It's very unusual for me to love a film adaptation of a book I like so much, but I adore the film. I actually enjoy his whole Danzig trilogy (The Tin Drum, Cat and Mouse and Dog Years). I must read The Meeting at Telgte.

David: Haven't heard of that novel, intrigued, will research. I also like Wild Wild West and Star Trek a huge amount. If I were to choose but two favourites, I'd go with the classic Twilight Zone and Outer Limits (great writing and stories, and so creative) -- for me those shows have never been bettered.

Kendall: Mielenkiintoinen , voisin vain käyttää Google Lähetä Artikkeli otsikot .
"The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit the views" (Doctor Who - The Face of Evil, Jan 22, 1977).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaldJean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 18 2016 at 00:49
Originally posted by Logan Logan wrote:

Hope not quoting still renders this easy followable for browsers.

Jean: I like all of those films too, The Tin Drum and Aguirre... being particular favourite films of mine. I've liked many Herzog and Schlöndorff films. As for one of Schlöndorff's with English, I found his The Ogre featuring John Malkovitch excellent. As for the Gunther Grass Tin Drum novel, it's one of my favourite novels. It's very unusual for me to love a film adaptation of a book I like so much, but I adore the film. I actually enjoy his whole Danzig trilogy (The Tin Drum, Cat and Mouse and Dog Years). I must read The Meeting at Telgte.

David: Haven't heard of that novel, intrigued, will research. I also like Wild Wild West and Star Trek a huge amount. If I were to choose but two favourites, I'd go with the classic Twilight Zone and Outer Limits (great writing and stories, and so creative) -- for me those shows have never been bettered.

Kendall: Mielenkiintoinen , voisin vain käyttää Google Lähetä Artikkeli otsikot .

"The Meeting at Telgte" is a parable on the "Group 49", an assembly of German authors that formed shortly after WW2. Grass dates the meeting 300 years back: the authors meet towards the end of the Thirty Years' War. Grass obviously saw himself as Grimmelshausen in that projection. I had no idea who these authors all were, but Friede helped me on that topic


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2016 at 12:22
Thanks, Jean, even if I don't get the references, it sounds like something I'd really like. The next one of his I want to locate is The Rat.

I'm doing a second list now from Canada:

Book:
Robertson Davies - Fifth Business (1970)
Like with Atwood, before I have chosen the first book of a trilogy cause good (and bad) things come in threes (well, not so much good with films in my experience)

Originally posted by amazon amazon wrote:

Ramsay is a man twice born, a man who has returned from the hell of the battle-grave at Passchendaele in World War I decorated with the Victoria Cross and destined to be caught in a no man's land where memory, history, and myth collide. As Ramsay tells his story, it begins to seem that from boyhood, he has exerted a perhaps mystical, perhaps pernicious, influence on those around him. His apparently innocent involvement in such innocuous events as the throwing of a snowball or the teaching of card tricks to a small boy in the end prove neither innocent nor innocuous. Fifth Business stands alone as a remarkable story told by a rational man who discovers that the marvelous is only another aspect of the real.


Films (since I said that co-productions are okay, a multinational fave of mine directed by a Canadian icon of cinema):

Dead Ringers (1988) - David Cronenberg

My favourite film he directed, and I like lots of his.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xmheE3L19c

Originally posted by Rotten Tomatoes Rotten Tomatoes wrote:

Based extremely loosely on a true story, Dead Ringers stars Jeremy Irons and Jeremy Irons. You read right--Irons essays the dual role of identical twin doctors, who frequently sub for each another professionally. The twins also capriciously share one another's lovers, priding themselves on that fact that their subterfurge has never been detected. Enter Genevieve Bujold, playing a popular actress. Courted by both twins, Genevieve selects the shyer of the two. The more aggressive sibling takes offense, setting the stage for the ruination of the brothers' relationship and careers. The split-screen and travelling-matte work in Dead Ringers is well nigh undetectable, but the film's "highlight" is a rather gruesome dream sequence involving severed skin (a favorite device of director David Cronenberg).


TV Show:

LEXX started in 1997 (a co-production, I like the initial mini-series particularly)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWNTtlSbyVg

Originally posted by imdb imdb wrote:

"Lexx" is the tale of a group of misfits who inadvertently steals the most powerful weapon of destruction in the two universes: the Lexx, an enormous, sentient insect genetically modified for space travel and planet-destroying capabilities. Although they have no real authority, they travel through hostile and chaotic universes, having a variety of adventures.


Anyone else want to share their cultural treasures (I use that term loosely, especially since I listed Lexx ;) )?

Canada Makes Formal UN Apology for Lexx



Edited by Logan - March 07 2018 at 23:11
"The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit the views" (Doctor Who - The Face of Evil, Jan 22, 1977).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2016 at 15:32
Ahh sh*t. Just lost a huuuuge post
Throwing in the towel.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2016 at 15:53
Damn, that's such a shame. I was really hoping you'd post here; would have loved to see your picks.
"The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit the views" (Doctor Who - The Face of Evil, Jan 22, 1977).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaldFriede Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 20 2016 at 16:28
Two German SF-series. The first is from 1966 (three years before I was born). It is however a cult classic and had many reruns, so I saw it as a kid. Here the first episode with English subtitles (horribly translated though):



The intro is very much like the intro to the original "Star Trek", though both series were developed independently.

The second series had two seasons, one in 2007, the other in 2011. It was loosely based on the "Star Diaries" by Polish author Stanislaw Lem. Ijon Tychy speaks with a fake Slavic accent. His companion is a so-called "hallucinelle", a female holographic entity. Here episode 2 with English subtitles:






Edited by BaldFriede - June 20 2016 at 16:37


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 21 2016 at 13:27
Thanks, those look good. Definitely going to watch all of that first one at some time.

I want to share two films, both of which I would have included in my first post had I decided to do more than one of each (saw both in the theatre when they came out and both had a big effect on me).

Atom Egoyan's The Sweet Hereafter (1997)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7w-dPZI_LY

The trailer sucks, maybe I'll remake the trailer one of these days. They did a poor job with the trailer, but it is a very moving and powerful film. Like my Cronenberg choice, it is something of an oddity in these people's oeuvres. Egoyan, like Cronenberg and Arcand, is a huge name in Canadian cinema. The movie takes place in BC (my province). Like Les Revenants which I do go on about, it involves a bus accident with children. It's based on a novel that I haven't read.

Originally posted by amazon.com amazon.com wrote:

In synopsis "The Sweet Hereafter" may sound like a devastatingly unpleasant downer, but don't be discouraged. The real subjects of this luminous picture (adapted by director Atom Egoyan from Russell Banks's novel) are hope and renewal--avoiding the cheap emotions suggested by those clich?©d terms. Like other Egoyan films ("Exotica", for one), it's an intriguing sort of mystery, a puzzle in which the big picture is not revealed until the very last piece is in place. A metropolitan attorney (Ian Holm) travels to a small British Columbian town where 14 children have been killed in a school bus accident to prepare a class-action suit. With sensitivity and empathy, he approaches relatives with promises that the suit will give focus and closure to their grief. And as he investigates the circumstances of the accident, he not only uncovers a few local secrets, but dredges up some painful pieces of his own past. Slowly, deeper mysteries are revealed--eternal mysteries at the very heart of human nature: Who is to blame for a tragedy like this? And why do people feel such a need to assign blame? Is that how they give meaning to otherwise inconceivable events? How does one reassemble a shattered life? "The Sweet Hereafter" is too honest to offer bromides, but it shows how a few people struggle, as best they can, to answer these questions for themselves. "--Jim Emerson"


And from Don Mckellar, Last Night (1998)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0skcGu6A01w

Originally posted by google google wrote:

In this Canadian drama by Don McKellar, various citizens of Toronto anxiously await the end of the world, which is occurring, for reasons explained, at midnight. While widower Patrick Wheeler (McKellar) braces for his fate, he meets Sandra (Sandra Oh), the wife of a businessman, who is intent on committing suicide. Meanwhile, Patrick's friend Craig Zwiller (Callum Keith Rennie), embracing a hedonistic approach to the apocalypse, decides to have as much sex as he can while there is still time.


Speaking of Don MCKellar who has made some other great stuff as well as been involved with lots of great stuff as an actor and or/writer such as Road Kill, Highway 61, the Red Violin, Blindness (not a great adaptation of what was one of the best novels I've read in recent years to be honest), was in Existenz (Cronenberg) and Exotica (Atom Egoyan) -- so these guys work together. He also starred in and wrote some of Bruce McDonald's (another leading light in the small world of English-speaking Canada) Twitch City (1998 to 2000 -- strong years here):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_upgJ-RYWbA

Then there's Made in Canada which was a highly enjoyable show, but I had a very negative experience with it (and it's far too late to deal with those issues now).

As for book: was going to go with a Mordecahi Richler, but I'll go with the American/Canadian William Gibson. He moved to Canada to escape the draft as a conscientious objector (or draft dodger to some). Going with Neuromancer (1984 which won the Philip K. Dick Award, the Hugo award, and the Nebula award ):

Originally posted by amazon.com amazon.com wrote:

The Matrix is a world within the world, a global consensus- hallucination, the representation of every byte of data in cyberspace . . .

Case had been the sharpest data-thief in the business, until vengeful former employees crippled his nervous system. But now a new and very mysterious employer recruits him for a last-chance run. The target: an unthinkably powerful artificial intelligence orbiting Earth in service of the sinister Tessier-Ashpool business clan. With a dead man riding shotgun and Molly, mirror-eyed street-samurai, to watch his back, Case embarks on an adventure that ups the ante on an entire genre of fiction.

Hotwired to the leading edges of art and technology, Neuromancer ranks with 1984 and Brave New World as one of the century's most potent visions of the future.



Edited by Logan - March 07 2018 at 23:10
"The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit the views" (Doctor Who - The Face of Evil, Jan 22, 1977).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2016 at 13:57
Let's see if I can make it through this one...
I'll start out with two of each - maybe swing back and add some more at some point.

Literature-wise I've always been a bit of a classic fan and to those of us who enjoy the more out there provocative, then there is no better Danish novel than Tom Kristensen's 'Hærværk'
The story is like a sophisticated take on the movie 'Leaving Las Vegas'. A guy basically decides to drink himself to death....yet it is also full of beautiful language and pocket philosophy that more than ever feels like it taps into our modern era zeitgeist. There's a sense of detachment running through this equivalent to that one comes across in Camus' writings, but one I ultimately feel is warmer and more tangible.

Dan Turèll - Vangede Billeder
I remember reading this back when I was in high school. It influenced the way I think about society and how all people have their individual place. The plumber is just as important as the big shot lawyer...especially if you've just returned from your virgin visit to an Indian restaurant. 'Vangede Billeder' is a collection of anecdotes and small town stories from around the area I myself grew up. Dan though grew up in the 50s and he tells us about the milk man, post man, butcher and the local winos in a heartfelt and very lovable manner - making one think of all these characters as part of the all-important city family. It's about as down to earth as any novel I've ever read, but his language and uncompromising style elevates the whole to this wonderful perspective, from where everything seems crystal clear. I love Dan. Most of us Danes are on a first name basis with uncle Danny as so many have come to know him. Hi s subsequent crime series is also highly recommended in which he interjects his love of the beatniks, jazz, 60s music, Donald Duck and a profound love for the underdog - the persona non grata.

TV series...yeah you already know this but here I go again. 
Lars Von Trier's breathtaking 'Riget' is about as good as it gets. I am so proud that my father worked on it, and I know he is too. I know you've seen it, so I'm just going to do some anecdotes for the fun of it.
Fun fact #1
The camera men worked their collective arses off trying to mirror Lars' vision - spent countless of hours conjuring up this particular colour scheme/filter in the pictures. At the end of it, Lars, merely took these rolls of film and threw them in an acid bath - completely neglecting all of their hard work....yet the effect it had was brilliant and brought to the series an eerie feel of grain and mud that echoed the surroundings and actors oh so beautifully. 
My father taught me a great lesson pertaining to this little stunt of his. I thought it was cruel and downright disrespectful to the camera men, but he told me 'but David - this is what a great director has to be able to do in order to come as close to his own vision as possible. in the end it is his baby. Film making, or at least, great film making is not about democracy. You can take hints and ideas from other folks involved and use them to whatever effect you wish, but in the end you have to be ready to cut lose the surplus 'fat' - the stuff that derails the overall story/plot/feel'. This is something that has stayed with me ever since. I'm not sure most modern filmmakers adhere to this philosophy...or maybe they're just allergic to their own vision? Who knows?
Fun fact #2
On one particular occasion they were filming on the 12th floor - the neonatal ward. They'd set pretty much everything up...but somehow forgotten about Lars' fear of heights...or whatever one wishes to call it. They had to postpone the whole thing and had folks drive all the way back to DRs drama headquarters in order to fetch lord knows how many feet of chord and a monitor, so as Lars could sit on the main floor in front of a screen with a walkie talky and direct his actors some 12 floors overheadLOL It all worked out in the end though...

'1864' Probably one of the most hated modern tv series here in Denmark, but I happen to love it. Most have bashed it for it's overt supernatural turns, but they seem to forget, that most of these stories were taken directly from Danish soldiers' own letters. Some of these men literally believed in magic, and the way it is shown up on the screen is downright beautiful to these eyes. I love the acting - the way it shifts from modern times, where we follow this punk girl's inner journey - going from a lost cause that steals and lies her way out of anything - to a proud young woman that stands up to the world and more importantly: to herself - and to the old days of gunfire, battles, Danish fascism and the almost drunken stupor in which it holds it's inhabitants as captives. 

Films?

'Hosekræmmeren' or 'Medea' by Lars Von Trier again. Yeah I know, but he is brilliant. This is basically a dramatisation of Steen Steensen Blicher's famous novel, in which we follow the girl Cecilie, who falls in love with her neighbour. A boy who is of lesser stature and therefor is well beneath her according to her father. The movie depicts her horrendous journey into madness and woe - yet delivered in a poetic way that exposes her parents double standards and as such the hypocrisy of the world and it's tendency to categorise everything according to wealth or class. I will never forget this movie - I've never seen blood this red.

'Midt i en Jazztid' by Knud Leif Thomsen. Adapted to film from the book by the same name (also a highly recommended read now that I think of it - especially if one is keen on jazz).
Funnily enough this movie pokes around at some of the same subjects as the aforementioned flick, but whereas 'Hosekræmmeren' takes place on the meadows of Jutland, farm country, MieJt tells it's story in the heart of Copenhagen 1930(ish). It deals with class differences and how these appear to the youngins of the day - though delivered poetically through a jazz beat. The heart beat of the city. 



Edited by Guldbamsen - June 25 2016 at 13:59
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2016 at 13:13
I thought of what the best Danish album might be after listening to Burnin' Red Ivanhoe w/ Povl Dissing - Elefantskovcikadeviser today. It is certainly up there for me, but then again there's also Steppeulvene - HIP, Kim Larsen - Værsgo' and Povl Dissing's own debut album Jeg Er En Tosset Spillemand....all of which probably goes waaaay over foreign heads and ears - especially Dissing's vocals that to the untrained ear sound awfully close to an astma patient on the wrong meds.

Edited by Guldbamsen - July 03 2016 at 13:14
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2016 at 13:27
Just saw your June picks now, David, thanks for persevering. I love the sound of your choices, and, well, we've talked von Trier before, but he's one of my very favourite directors.

EDIT: I was planning to save Kids in the Hall for a later post, and then forgot. This was a very significant sketch comedy TV show from Canada (I guess the other comedy that was really well known here is SCTV):

This is one of my favourites from Kids in the Hall. Any time I have sausages, I always think of this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sON0He2mTC8

Edited by Logan - March 07 2018 at 23:09
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TeleStrat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2016 at 16:54
TV shows that I'm following on network and cable...

Blue Bloods  (Tom Selleck, Donnie Wahlberg)
Elementary   (Johnny Lee Miller, Lucy Liu)
Ray Donovan  (Liev Schreiber, John Voight)
Blacklist  (Megan Boone, James Spader)
Fargo  (various)
The Americans  (Keri Russell, Matthew Rhys)
The Last Ship  (Eric Dane, Rhona Mitra, Adam Baldwin)
Veep  (Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Kevin Dunn, Tony Hale)
The Outsiders  (David Morse, Thomas M. Wright, Gillian Alexy)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote ClemofNazareth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2016 at 19:40
American authors (tried to focus on ones that are more known here than elsewhere):
Ray Bradbury - everything
Kurt Vonnegut - everything
Lewis B. Puller, Jr. - Fortunate Son
Hunter S. Thompson - Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, the Rum Diaries, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72
S.E. Hinton - the Outsiders, Rumblefish, That was Then This is Now, Tex

Television:
the Daily Show (with Jon Stewart)
Sesame Street
The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret (Canadian-American)
All in the Family
Soap
Taxi
Friday Night Lights
Joan of Arcadia
M*A*S*H

Films:
the Wizard of Oz
A Few Good Men
Philadelphia
Fargo
Unforgiven
Broken Flowers
Frozen River
Winter's Bone
What About Bob?

Music-themed films:
FM
Heavy Metal (Canadian-American)
Standing in the Shadows of Motown
Anvil! the Story of Anvil (Canadian-American)
Woodstock
This is Spinal Tap
the Blues Brothers

"Peace is the only battle worth waging."

Albert Camus
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Finnforest Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2016 at 20:28
Originally posted by Atavachron Atavachron wrote:

U.S. 

I've got a thing for film & tv of the 50s and early 60s, probably because they were all in reruns when I was a kid and were so much better than anything new in the 70s & 80s.





Same here David.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 03 2016 at 21:14
^ watching Jason and the Argonauts from '63 now

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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought."   -- John F. Kennedy
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MortSahlFan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 01 2018 at 16:04
My favorites from the US

Movies
-Harry and Tonto
-Nashville
-They Shoot Horses, Don't They?
-Network
-One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest

"A Catcher in the Rye" - I mostly read biographies - Mort Sahl, Marlon Brando, Bill Hicks, John Cassavetes are interesting.. I should mention Frank Capra - who is probably the best director from here.

TV -- "The Larry Sanders Show".. I am curious to see how "Roseanne" will be when it re-boots this month.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mortte Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 07 2018 at 22:47
Books:
Marko Tapio: Arktinen Hysteria I & II
Veijo Meri: Manillaköysi
Anu Kaipainen: Arkkienkeli Oulussa
Aleksis Kivi: Seitsemän Veljestä
Kauko Röyhkä: Kaksi Aurinkoa
Joni Skiftesvik: Pystyyn Haudattu

Movies:
Aki Kaurismäki: Mies Vailla Menneisyyttä
Mika Kaurismäki: Tyttökuningas
Mika Rättö: Samurai Rauni Reposaarelainen
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