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1977 — a farewell to Prog’s golden era?

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HackettFan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HackettFan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 18 2018 at 23:08
I think of the end of the golden age being the end of ‘74. If we look at the OP, counter to its thesis, the largest drop off is after ‘75. In the OP’s favor, there is a high proliferation of Canterbury bands and their output running up through ‘77. Gentle Giant, though I don’t care for them, were doing much the same post-75 as they were doing up to ‘75. Other examples abound, but I bid everyone good night for now.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote M27Barney Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 13:40
What is the OP counter?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 25 2018 at 14:07
On the other hand, jazz-rock fusion definitely came on strong in the 1977 time period and thereafter.  It's "golden era" may have actually begun about 1976.  

Al Dimeola's sublime solo release "Land of the Midnight Sun" was released in late 1976, and this led to a string of very popular solo LPs and his prominence in the fusion community.  

Other bands/artists who flourished in this period include Brand X, Bill Bruford, Weather Report, Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke and many others. 

I often find that fusion is the "poor stepchild" when prog is being discussed!  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 28 2018 at 00:12
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

On the other hand, jazz-rock fusion definitely came on strong in the 1977 time period and thereafter.  It's "golden era" may have actually begun about 1976.  

Al Dimeola's sublime solo release "Land of the Midnight Sun" was released in late 1976, and this led to a string of very popular solo LPs and his prominence in the fusion community.  

Other bands/artists who flourished in this period include Brand X, Bill Bruford, Weather Report, Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke and many others. 

I often find that fusion is the "poor stepchild" when prog is being discussed!  

I personally think this is one of the reasons Prog went off the radar for a while. This was not the right direction for prog in my opinion. I did like Colosseum II but a lot of this stuff was just being churned out and for a 15 year old boy at the time (as I was) it held very little interest. Rush pointed the direction with 2112 and Iron Maiden ran with it. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote proghaven Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 28 2018 at 23:17
If 'golden era' means 'prog was a fashionable music', then more or less yes. But if 'golden era' means 'there were a lot of musically significant prog albums', then definitively no.
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