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Tangerine Dream "Extended" Albums

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    Posted: July 17 2018 at 04:11
Hi dreamers.

An amateur musician has reproduced the music and "extended" some of the classic albums of TD :


All extended albums so far:

I don't know if the person owns the rights to do publish such exercise but the result is interesting.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Meltdowner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 04:23
The original Hyperborea is already long as it is :P Is it really necessary? I always thought most of their music has great timing, not staying more/less time than needed in the same place. Yet their music flows so effortlessly.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Davesax1965 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 07:08
Not two of my favourite Tangerine Dream albums. I'd actually make Hypoborea about 30 minutes shorter. ;-)

From a technical perspective, it's quite easy to replicate 70's TD. You, er, might have seen my posts in Tech Talk about modular synths, including the one I built myself. I've got 10 sequencers. You just set up a sequence, run it through a quantiser which changes the notes according to a set of rules - ie. min 7th scale - and then have some way of switching from one sequence to another. Tangerine Dream used Moog 960 sequencers, mainly in four step patterns. Now the technology is cheap, and a modular synth doesn't cost as much as a house, it's quite easy to replicate. 

So, avail yourself of some voltage controlled oscillators, a sequencer or several, a Moog style 24dB transistor ladder filter, choose a key, solo over the top with flute or guitar or what have you, you're in business. 

"Here's some sequencers I made earlier". Three weekends with a soldering iron. ;-)


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Davesax1965 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 07:09
The result (jam session, my synth and my brothers') being something like this. Free download. Totally improvised jam. 

https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/album/modular-synth-jam-1-free-download

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Davesax1965 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 07:14
I was thinking of completely reproducing Ricochet at one point - it's an album I am absolutely fascinated by. It would be a reinterpretation with additions. "In the style of". 

The problem is that Tangerine Dream fans are extremely monolithic and only buy Tangerine Dream stuff. Even if you did a gig on their back door step "and you weren't Tangerine Dream", then no one would show up. Bands like Redshift are extremely good and in the same canon, they get some support, but the problem of gigging with old analogue gear means you have to be extremely dedicated to make it worth while. Also you need to have a lot of support from fans. They're harder to find than you might think. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Davesax1965 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 07:27
Also helps a bit that I've got more hardware (self built, mainly) than Tangerine Dream had in 1974. ;-)



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote philipemery Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 07:59
They have 150+ albums... why do we need more Tangerine Dream at this point? They already have more than I am even going to attempt listening to.

I mean it is rather interesting that people are doing this... but it is Tangerine Dream... their music goes on far longer than welcome as is. Making it even more arduous. That being said, the people who did this are pretty competent at imitating Tangerine Dream. But as was said above, it isn't that technically impressive to do so.
But the sun is eclipsed by the moon. -- Pink Floyd
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Davesax1965 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 09:36
Got to agree with Phil about the "150 albums" as well. 
Probably about 140 too many. 

When a band reforms with none of the original members, I get the impression they should just go onstage with a bunch of cash registers and set the ching !!! noise to music. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote verslibre Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 10:28
Originally posted by Davesax1965 Davesax1965 wrote:

Not two of my favourite Tangerine Dream albums. I'd actually make Hypoborea about 30 minutes shorter. ;-)

Not Stratosfear? That and Force Majeure are easily their best '70s offerings, plus Sorcerer as the obligatory soundtrack. 

Originally posted by Davesax1965 Davesax1965 wrote:

From a technical perspective, it's quite easy to replicate 70's TD.

The sequences, yes. The atmospheres and melodies are another matter. There have been many more hits than misses in the decades since, with one of the best latter-day efforts being Arc's Fracture, a standout against the myriad dodgy attempts from the UK, USA and other regions. Stratosfear's title track is simply a marvel. What I love about Mark Shreeve's post-Assassin records are their decidedly non-Berlin aesthetic.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote verslibre Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 10:33
Originally posted by philipemery philipemery wrote:

They have 150+ albums... why do we need more Tangerine Dream at this point? They already have more than I am even going to attempt listening to.

Looks like they're only tackling classic era albums, i.e. mid-70s - mid-80s. That stuff's a big influence on the synthwave scene nowadays. You'll never hear an "extended" version of Mars Polaris, trust me!

I mean it is rather interesting that people are doing this... but it is Tangerine Dream... their music goes on far longer than welcome as is. Making it even more arduous. That being said, the people who did this are pretty competent at imitating Tangerine Dream. But as was said above, it isn't that technically impressive to do so.[/QUOTE] 

It's just looping. There's no playing involved. Sounds like they just connected most of the tracks end to end. I have to admit, I like the extended version of "Le Parc." Those are some of the best sequences to ever punctuate the airwaves.

I concur we certainly didn't need a longer version of "Sphinx Lightning." They don't need to mess with any of Poland's four sides, either. That thing's perfect as is.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philipemery Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 17 2018 at 11:03
Originally posted by Davesax1965 Davesax1965 wrote:

Got to agree with Phil about the "150 albums" as well. 
Probably about 140 too many. 

When a band reforms with none of the original members, I get the impression they should just go onstage with a bunch of cash registers and set the ching !!! noise to music. 


Pink Floyd would sue them lol.
But the sun is eclipsed by the moon. -- Pink Floyd
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Jenkins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 06:12
While it's true that early improvisational Tangerine Dream albums are easy to imitate if you have a few sequencers and Mellotron sounds, the band fairly rapidly outgrew this approach. From Stratosfear, the music was way more 'composed', and certainly by the time of Hyperborea, impossible to imitate purely by playing repetitive sequences. i'd argue that the creative peak of TD's output was about the time of Logos and Poland, where the pre-programmed nature of their 'live' performances was such that they couldn't possibly have been improvised. Of course, in later years they went too far down the compositional route, churning out formulaic New Age instrumentals with little improvisational element, and thus losing their original charm. (Arguably the new line-up is recovering some of the improvisational element). Still, I don't think these 'Classic Extension' versions serve any creative purpose whatsoever.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Davesax1965 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 10:10
Believe it or not, the later stuff (80's) is quite easy to (roughly) emulate using modern technology. If you don't mind (mainly) VST's. Perversely, the analogue sequenced stuff is slightly more tricky. But it's still fairly simple.

Modern technology and decreasing prices mean that a studio musician can now assemble lots of esoteric instruments - which was what Tangerine Dream was about. Where they paid a fortune to get the original instruments, there are much cheaper modern alternatives available.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Davesax1965 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 10:11
But, agreed - why do it ? ;-)

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Jenkins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 10:29
Oh yeah, you can emulate the sounds of the 80s stuff with VSTs - we all have access to the digital recreations of instruments like PPGs and Prophets. But the point I was making is that compositionally, the 80s stuff is not so easily imitated. It would require a lot more compositional skill than the early improvised stuff. (I put this down to the contribution of Johannes Schmoelling, who is classically trained and has real keyboard ability). 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philipemery Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 11:02
Yeah actually it is rather easily emulated, because it is all just "slightly" more complicated programmed sequences. It is still not actually that hard. Those "compositions" are just programs basically. Real compositions cannot be churned out like a machine gun, at the rate that TD shot out albums. No, there wasn't actually that much complicated composing going on at all.

Its one major reason I don't even care to buy TD albums, because past the 70's, the innovative quality declined to just being sub-standard synth and sequencer work, that people now dote on as some kind of genius work of composition.

You want to hear compositional complexity? Listen to Magma, Yes, Gentle Giant, Renaissance, King Crimson, ELP, or Pink Floyd. But Tangerine Dream is not where you go to hear that. That is where you go when you want to listen to non-stop analog synthesizer and sequencer instrumentals.
But the sun is eclipsed by the moon. -- Pink Floyd
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philipemery Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 11:06
That and half the prog bands of the 70's had classically trained musicians, particularly keyboardists.

Throw a dart and you'll find one.
But the sun is eclipsed by the moon. -- Pink Floyd
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Jenkins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 11:08
Oh yeah, I absolutely agree that Magma, Yes, Crimson et al are leagues ahead of TD in terms of composition. That's why no-one sits down and thinks 'I'll just knock out a quick Magma soundalike album this afternoon', as they do with TD. But, I maintain that while there are plenty of imitators of early TD, with the easy non-stop sequences, no-one much tries to imitate their later work, which does actually require some compositional input. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote philipemery Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 12:00
I'd argue that no one tries to imitate their later work because it is sub-standard and not at all memorable compared to their earlier stuff.
But the sun is eclipsed by the moon. -- Pink Floyd
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Modrigue Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 18 2018 at 12:12
Originally posted by philipemery philipemery wrote:

I'd argue that no one tries to imitate their later work because it is sub-standard and not at all memorable compared to their earlier stuff.


Personally, I find that early material of 90's electronica / IDM bands - such as Aphex Twin, Autechre or Plone - share great similarities with passages from Hyperborea and Poland. So, although not as groundbreaking and mesmerizing as in the 70's, I consider TD's early 80's time period to be influential.
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