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82: Prat's Masal or Supertramp's Famous Last Words

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Poll Question: Which album do you prefer?
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    Posted: August 10 2018 at 15:08
A big name versus a much lesser know name. These are two albums from 1982 with some level of sax appeal, which do you prefer?





I considered including Pierre Henry & Urban Sax's excellent Paradise Lost (not in PA), but decided not to.


Edited by Logan - August 10 2018 at 15:26
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 10 2018 at 19:16
Since Masal is not well-known, here are two reviews of it, plus two reviews of Famous Last Words.

Masal reviews:

Originally posted by Mellotron Storm Mellotron Storm wrote:

Jean-Paul Prat is a very talented Frenchman who seems to be able to play any instrument he gets his hands on given some time to figure it out. He'll be the lead guitarist in one band and the keyboard player in another. He's also been the lead vocalist. On this particular album he's on the drum-kit. In his late teens he was a big fan of DEEP PURPLE and CHICAGO but his biggest inspiration was MAGMA. He would not only meet Christian Vander but he and his 14 piece band who are featured on the 42 minute track here called "Masal" would open for MAGMA on one of their tours. Once you hear this track you'll catch that Zeuhl connection pretty quickly. In fact most sites have this album listed under the Zeuhl genre.The remaining songs on here are bonus tracks and from later in his career with a smaller band and they aren't Zeuhl but more Jazz flavoured. I like how the Wayside site calls this album a Big Band Zeuhl record. Now I must admit i'm not into orchestral music because I don't like hearing 10 violinists and 10 sax players and 10 whatever instruments playing the same notes that create a "big sound". No thankyou ! You can keep your Classical music, but fortunately this doesn't degenerate too much into that. It does enough though for me to keep it at 4 stars lets put it that way.
"Masal" starts off with those deep, dark sounding bass lines as it builds. How good do these drums sound ! Horns kick in around 2 1/2 minutes. Love that growly bass. A calm after 5 minutes then it starts to build with piano, then drums, then bass. So good.The guitar is screaming at one point after 8 minutes. A change a minute later as it picks up and horns come to the fore. Amazing sound 11 1/2 minutes in then it settles back.Guitar then horns return before it settles again before 16 minutes. Drums and horns start to build then it settles again before 18 1/2 minutes and again before 21 minutes and after 23 1/2 minutes. Each time it builds after the calm. Drums pound away 25 minutes in. It settles a minute later. A beat with flute come in. A calm at 28 1/2 minutes then we get laughter as it kicks back in. Horns are prominant.Piano and chunky bass before 32 minutes as drums impress as usual.The guitar joins in and rips it up. A calm 34 1/2 minutes in. Relaxed guitar 38 minutes in. It picks up 39 1/2 minutes in then settles back with vocal melodies and piano. It's building again.What a killer track that is.Definitely a 4.5 star album. A Prog lover's delight.

Most feel the bonus tracks are just as good as the title track but I don't,well not quite anyway. "Maran Atha- Selah" is though. Piano, bass and drums build and this sounds really good. Horns before 1 1/2 minutes then guitar. A change after 5 1/2 minutes as it turns dark and the tempo slows down some. Another change before 12 minutes as it calms right down with piano. It kicks back in after 13 minutes but settles back again quickly. It kicks back in one more time at 15 minutes to end it. "Messangers De Notre-Dame" is very good as well with that good beat along with piano and horns. "Valse Funebre" isn't as good but I still like it. "Origines-Seconde Partie" fortunately is under 4 minutes because I don't like it at all. It's all about choirs and vocals like being in church really.

So 4.5 for the original album that is one long track released in 1982.The bonus tracks are impressive except for the last one in my opinion. So yes don't even hesitate to get this if you like adventerous music with lots of horns and a Zeuhl flavour.


Originally posted by apps79 apps79 wrote:

French composer, drummer and keyboardist Jean-Paul Prat was born in 1953 in Louhans and was the founder of the Masal group back in early-70's.Masal had a great live activity, opening for bands such as Magma, Gong and Soft Machine, playing a Zeuhl-influenced Prog Rock, but disbanded in 1976.For some years Prat was found in the line-up of different bands, even relocating in Germany for some time, but in early-80's he had the chance to recollect Masal with both old and new bandmates.He recorded an album in July 82' at Studio Venus in Longueville, which saw the light over a year later on the tiny Stand-By Records and had a limited distribution.
The album was credited to Jean-Paul Prat's name, though it was actually a collective effort by the new Masal core, including no less than 11 musicians.Although the band was inspired by MAGMA's music back in the 70's, there is little Zeuhl influence on ''Masal''.In fact the music has much more to do with the personal works of Finnish composers such as PEKKA POHJOLA, JUKKA GUSTAVSON or ANSSI TIKANMAKI, a jazzy-inspired Progressive Rock with lots of variations and different movements.''Masal'' consists of a very long eponymous suite, clocking at 42 minutes, split in two parts on the original issue due to the limited capacity of vinyl pressings.The music is simply outstanding and far from the aesthetics of the age.Superb, orchestral and uncommercial Prog/Jazz Rock, performed like a long symphony and highlighted by a grandiose section of wind instruments and the notable guitar work of the three guitarists appearing on the album.''Masal'' passes through many dramatic textures with impressive guitar moves outbattled by masterful trumpet and sax solos, while these are often interrupted by several smoother moments with Classical-, Jazz- and a bit of Folk-influenced themes (incuding some fantastic, dreamy flute parts) with a clam but still quite impressive atmosphere.There are also plenty of complicated, heavy breaks with a KING CRIMSON-guided adventurous approach.Piano and synthesizers are used with perfection, offering measured moments of a unique mood, usually combined with the great guitar parts.The result is an unbelievably tight long piece of music with a unique atmosphere of its own, a milestone of the instrumental Prog music of the 80's.

A decade later the album was re-issued by Musea on CD, offering this piece of music in its entirety without the break of the vinyl issue.This edition contains also five unreleased tracks performed by Masal after the release of their debut, originally contained in cassette only releases.The line-up of the group was now significantly reduced, but most of the tracks feature the performances of guitarists Alain Escure and Carlo Grassi along with sax player Richard Heritier, all of them had participated on the debut album of the group.All of them follow a similar style with Masal's sole 80's release with excellent, refined and jazzy Progressive Rock with dominant work on saxes and trumpets, soaring guitar washes and some very atmospheric synthesizers.Maybe the music at moments is less dramatic and more optimistic, but the unique talent of Prat composing skills is still there to offer another few excellent tracks.

No doubt, this album is a must-have for all fans of instrumental Progressive Rock and even more for anyone deep into Symphonic/Jazz Rock.The vinyl issue would be an excellent purchase, the CD-bonus track edition would be an even better.Nevertheless, this is an amazing piece of music.Highly recommended.


Famous Last Word reviews:

Originally posted by ClemofNazareth ClemofNazareth wrote:


Some of the greatest lineups in progressive music were undone in the 1980s by the personal and creative upheaval that characterized the early part of that decade. Unfortunately Supertramp was no exception. 'Famous Last Words' marked the departure of founding member Roger Hodgson and the dissolution of one of the truly memorable songwriting duos of modern music in Hodgson and Rick Davies. The split would leave Davies as the lone original member as well as the de facto (and legal) steward of the band's future direction. Hodgson would launch a solo career. Neither would achieve the kind of commercial or creative success that Supertramp did in the 1970s.
I got into Supertramp with 'Even in the Quietest Moments' and quickly discovered the much more dazzling 'Crime of the Century'. When 'Breakfast in America' released in 1979 I was swept up with the millions of other who gravitated to the band's unique blend of jazz, pop, nostalgia and brilliant songwriting as the album went quadrillion²-platinum or whatever it ended up selling. Three years later I still played the record regularly and several of the hits were still on the radio, but since the band didn't tour very heavily across the heart of America they weren't on my radar all that much.

Then out of nowhere comes "?famous last words?", and of course my curiosity was piqued. What had the boys come up with this time? Well, not more of the same, I can assure you of that. There is plenty of symbolism in this album that signals the pending breakup, and the overall mood is rather resigned and depressing. First is the cover itself, a picture of a circus performer on a tightrope looking nervously over his shoulder as an ominous hand reaches out to sever the rope with a huge pair of scissors. The album title suggests Hodgson and Davies knew people like me would be writing wistful memorials long after the band itself was no more. The splitting of songwriting credits to clearly distinguish between those of Hodgson and those of Davies was a first for the band; on previous albums, the credits were always shared in one way or another. The inside liner notes even have the lyrics color-coded to distinguish between the two writers. Inside the sleeve a picture of the band shows the five members, none smiling, and all tip-toeing nervously across their separate tightropes. And the lyrics nearly all reflect on watershed points within personal relationships in one way or another. There was no question whatsoever that this was the swan song for Supertramp, and that the breakup was not all smiles and hugs.

If you can get past the mildly depressing nature of the packaging though, there is actually some pretty good music here. Perhaps also symbolic, the track list both begins and ends with songs written by Hodgson. And knowing Hodgson's flair for drama, I think it's also intentional that the album begins on a pensive high note with "Crazy":

"Here's little song to make you feel good, put a little light in your day; these are crazy times, and it's all been getting pretty serious. Here's a little song to make you feel right, send the blues away; well it's a crazy game, tell me who's to blame ? I'm pretty curious";

And ends with the sad and melancholy "Don't Leave Me Now":

"Don't leave me now, leave me holding an empty heart. As the curtains start to fall? all alone in this crazy world, when I'm old and cold and grey and time is gone".

Pain is just a reminder that you're alive, I suppose.

"Crazy" is a typical opening number for the band, a peppy tempo with lots of piano, saxophone highlights and a short sax solo all wrapped up in Hodgson's slightly-mad-Englishman vocals, with complementary backing by Davies. In keeping with the trend in some of the band's other albums, the presence of Hodgson's guitar is secondary to the keyboards.

Davies wrote "Put on Your Old Brown Shoes", a kind of retro jazzy/blues number with what sounds like alto sax and an almost ragtime vibe to the piano. The Wilson sisters of Heart provide backing vocals, and overall this is not unlike some of the music on their 'Private Auditions' album of the same period. The lyrics are in keeping with the general breakup theme of the album, accented by a nice piano/sax extended instrumental passage in the middle of the song:

"You and me, we're helpless can't you see ? we've got to get away, get away. Got to move on, catch the next train and we'll be gone;

And the rest of our lives we'll be free".

Hodgson serves up one of his glossy pure-pop tunes with "It's Raining Again", which turned out to be another huge hit for the band. This is one of those songs you either love or hate, and I choose to love it. Like "Dreamer" or "The Logical Song" these are bitingly sarcastic lyrics set to an upbeat, almost danceable rhythm, and some of the most haunting saxophone work John Helliwell has ever done:

"It's raining again, you know it's hard to pretend. Oh no, it's raining again, too bad I'm losing a friend".

The children's chorus ending of nursery rhyme lyrics is a bit cheesy and self-indulgent on Hodgson's part, but clearly the guy was dealing with some pretty raw emotions at the time and this is how he often expressed those feelings in his music. The song contains one of the most striking lyrical passages Hodgson ever put on paper, in my opinion:

"You're old enough some people say, to read the signs and walk away. It's only time that heals the pain, and makes the sun come out again".

I still can't hear that passage even today without blinking back a few tears.

I personally think that "Bonnie" is a highly symbolic work by Davies to describe the intensely personal relationship between him and Hodgson. The lyrics read like the story of an obsessed fan of an old-time movie star who is longing to get closer to her, but I believe it also describes how Davies may have felt about Hodgson at one time.

Hodgson follows that one with the most achingly personal lament he ever penned ? "Know Who You Are". This is a mostly acoustic number with Hodgson strumming guitar and singing in a halting, pensive mood, and I can't listen to it without feeling like a gawking intruder into an intensely personal moment for Hodgson:

"Know who you are? there's a new song inside you. Weep if you can? let the tears fall behind you".

Davies counters with another retro-sounding light jazzy number, "My Kind of Lady". By now the stylistically different directions Hodgson and Davies were pursuing was becoming apparent. For me this is the weakest track on the album, with 50's-sounding backing vocals, rather tepid piano, and overall just a bit of unenthusiastic, plodding tempo. Perhaps part of the reason it fell flat was that neither Hodgson nor Davies were very enthusiastic about recording it.

This sets up one of the band's strongest album finishes though, with the remaining three tracks all being complex and highly memorable. Hodgson's "C'est le bon" is something of an autobiography, with gorgeous acoustic guitar accented by clarinet while Hodgson chants about having a heart full of music that just has to get out, regardless of the consequences. The Wilson sisters add touching backing vocals to give the song a timeless feel, making it one of the great forgotten Supertramp classics.

Davies' strongest work follows his weakest one with the horn-driven "Waiting So Long". Here again the listener cannot escape the tension in the band, with lyrics that are both biting and sad: "Did you get all you want? Did we see the whole show? So where's all the fun that we used to know? As the memories fade way out of view, I'd love those old days to come back to you". Hodgson offers his strongest guitar work on the album, heavy and brooding but full of life at the same time.

The album closes with the final emotional cry from Hodgson, the deeply resigned soul- sigh in "Don't Leave Me Now". Musically this is nothing new from the band ? melodic and beautiful piano and thoughtful saxophone, very little guitar, and the little-known Claire Diament with some very pleasant backing vocals. But the message is clear in the lyrics, and with the end of the album also comes the end of the band, at least as we all knew and loved them:

"Don't leave me now, leave me out with nowhere to go. As the shadows start to fall ?

Don't leave me now".

In some ways I see this album as a soundtrack to the end of an age, and a symbol of the much broader dissolution of a decade of wonderful music, incredible artistic creativity, and pleasant memories. It's a stark contrast to the band's 'Breakfast in America' peak, but also an incredibly poignant and personal look inside the souls of one of the great musical icons of an eclectic and artistic generation.

It pains me to listen to this album, especially today as those of us who came out of that generation and those times are now adults, and we are just expected to deal with some of the same kinds of heavy, somber emotions and complex relationships that once seemed so simple and straightforward. But it is also a reminder that once you get past all the extraneous trappings, life is really all about our relationships with each other. Hodgson and Davies understood that, probably still do today. And I cherish the many songs where they expressed this and shared their emotions with us willing listeners. I am confident I am a better man for it. Hopefully those who listen to this music today and contemplate all the layers of meaning it holds for our personal interactions will someday feel the same way.

peace


Originally posted by Chicapah Chicapah wrote:

How fickle the madding crowd can be. A mere three years after launching the wildly successful bombshell that was 1979's "Breakfast in America," (the album that sat at the number one position for weeks on end and spawned four top twenty hit singles still spinning in heavy rotation on classic rock radio stations three decades later) Supertramp released ".Famous Last Words" and the public shrugged. Despite rising to the #5 position on the album charts it came and went in a flash before drifting into anonymity. Having never heard it myself I was somewhat reticent to add it to my crossover prog collection but now that I've repeatedly listened to it for months I'm pleased to report that I think it's gotten a bum rap that it doesn't deserve. In fact, it's pretty dern good and beats the britches off of the higher-rated but rather boring "Crisis, What Crisis?"
Since Roger Hodgson bid the band adieu shortly after this record hit the stores it's not surprising to find the personality clashes and general turmoil that existed in the group surfacing in the writing of he and cohort Rick Davies. Roger tap-dancing into the wings after 13 years of partnership with Rick doesn't come as much of a shock at all. Actually, that kind of longevity is, in and of itself, amazing. But the "official" reason given for the split is that their wives didn't get along. Huh? Excuse me, but WTF? Are you pulling our collective prog leg? One of the most heralded writing duos of the 70s parted ways because the company Christmas party was awkward? Why not just tell the ladies that if they can't play nice they're forever banned from the rehearsal and studio sessions? Sounds pretty ticky-tacky and childish if you ask me. Still, despite the ridiculous soap opera backdrop, they managed to put together a collage of songs worthy of your attention.

By the time the first few notes enter your ear canals you'll know this is the one and only Supertramp. Their unique sound is unmistakable and "Crazy" is a prime example of their inimitable style. It's a well- written tune based on pounding piano chords, John Helliwell's lively saxophone and Hodgson's soaring soprano voice but, at the same time, the lyrics betray the tension within. "These are crazy times," Roger sings, "and it's all been getting pretty serious..." I especially like the way they allow the "crazy" refrain at the end to play itself out and not cut it short for the sake of radio friendliness. The bluesy, Wurlitzer piano-dominated sway of "Put on Your Old Brown Shoes" instantly identifies it as one of Davies' lite-rock compositions and, as such, one shouldn't really expect any surprises. Helliwell tactfully avoids overplaying during his sax solo and the tight horn/guitar riffs that color the song towards the end are delightful. I get the feeling that Rick is serenading the soon-to-be-departed with resigned lines like "you know you paid your dues/did all you could/time to move on/no more to say."

According to reputable sources "It's Raining Again" climbed up to the #11 spot on the Top 40 but it also did a splendid job of avoiding being played on the stations I was listening to at the time. Now that I've become acquainted with this catchy little ditty I'm confused as to why the great unwashed masses didn't embrace it the same way they did, say, "The Logical Song." It's just as memorable and follows the same poppish formula but it faded from view as quickly as the LP did. Of course, 1982 was the dawning age of the damned MTV virus and perhaps the lack of a "groovy" video clip retarded its growth (not to mention its dubious use of the made-up-in-order-to-complete-a-rhyme word uptighter.) "You're old enough some people say/to read the signs and walk away/it's only time that heals the pain/and makes the sun come out again." Roger sings, possibly to himself. "Bonnie" (Come on, Rick, you couldn't pick a classier name than that?) is next and if you're patient enough to get through its initial puppy-love schmaltziness you'll be rewarded with a transcendent, symphonic prog movement featuring an infectious melody flowing over deep synthesized strings that is heavenly. I adore the acoustic piano sound producer Peter Henderson and his engineering crew procure throughout the piece.

Another identifiable trait of the Supertramp modus operandi surfaces when Hodgson straps on his 12- string acoustic guitar for "Know Who You Are" and delivers an airy, delicate performance sans drums with a haunting melody that sorta reminds me of Glenn Miller's "Moonlight Serenade." Richard Newson's sparse string arrangement adds a simple grace to the subtlety of the piece. Unfortunately, that quiet serenity is rudely interrupted by the pseudo doo-wop of "My Kind of Lady," the only throwaway track on the album. Okay, it's not horrific but it's definitely not my style and it resides miles away from Progland. Roger gets the 'Tramp train back on the rails with another 12-string extravaganza, the charming "C'est Le Bon." John's fluid clarinet and Dougie Thompson's easy-to- overlook-but-supremely-tasteful bass lines contribute to the number's allure as this one slowly builds to a full, towering chorus. Hodgson's poignant lyrics ring true for every musician who's had to swim against the current just to follow his artistic calling. "I never knew what a man was supposed to be/I never wanted the responsibility/I still remember what they tried to make of me/they used to wonder why they couldn't get through to me/'cause all that I had was this music/a-coming to me/and all that I had was this rhythm/a-coming through me." he sings.

Supertramp's prog leanings are very apparent on the last two cuts. "Waiting So Long" has a basic-yet- effective vocal/piano intro, then heavy accents add drama and gravity to the proceedings. The song utilizes a layer-by-layer construction that eventually leads to one of Roger's most emotional electric guitar rides ever and a menacing, thunder-in-the-distance finale. You can detect a palpable sorrow in Davies' voice. "Did you get all you want?/Did we see the whole show?/so where's all the fun/that we used to know?/as the memories fade/way out of view/I'd love those old days/to come back to you..." he laments, "But the blindness goes on, the blindness goes on..." The album ends with the equally despairing but nonetheless appropriate "Don't Leave Me Now." The stillness of the introduction is broken abruptly by strong, angry piano chords ala "Crime of the Century" and Helliwell's soulful saxophone wailing away. The heartbreaking words speak for themselves. "Don't leave me now/all alone in this crazy world/when I'm old and cold and grey/and the time is gone." Hodgson cries. As they wisely allow the tune to wander without hurry down its own lonely road you'll hear nostalgic strains of the harmonica from "School" wafting in the breeze. It's a classy touch. Accompanied only by funeral-like drums the music slowly disappears over the far horizon like a cemetery-bound procession mourning the death of a loved one.

Even if you're no more than a casual fan of Supertramp I advise you to give ".Famous Last Words" a fighting chance. You'll like it. It's not as accessible and internationally popular as its famous predecessor but few albums are. Actually, in a prog sense, it's more akin to "Even in the Quietest Moments." so its appeal to those who lean in that direction should be obvious. There's a lot here to enjoy. 3.6 stars.



Edited by Logan - August 10 2018 at 19:17
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Mascodagama Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2018 at 01:06
Masal absolutely, a great album of exhilirating big-band prog with just the faintest soupçon of Zeuhl influence - though as apps79 says, some of Pekka Pohjola’s works such as B. the Magpie are a better point of reference. But I don’t think it's at all inaccessible. One can luxuriate in the surging brass riffs and crunchy guitar action and be swept along at first listen, I think.

J-P Prat’s later recordings with smaller groups under the band name Masal are also very much worth tracking down, though there is much less by way of fireworks - but more jazz and a little minimalism. Those albums feel to me in some ways like precursors to the work of current French sister-groups Ghost Rhythms and Lady With. Which from me is about the highest praise I've got.


Edited by Mascodagama - August 11 2018 at 01:29
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2018 at 07:07
Thanks for the response, Simon. We had some silent voters, and I was concerned that no one would actually write anything (I'm always more interested in people's thoughts than just their votes). Masal was one of my favourite evaluations whilst on the Eclectic Prog team (I have Avestin to thank for that as I recall). I think it's a beautiful album, and I also love the "bonus" tracks. I actually don't think that I know Ghost Rhythms and Lady With, so I have some tracking down to do.

I hope this will turn some people onto Masal. It's a fairly Zeuhlish album that I think could appeal to many due to its symphonic qualities and its jazz qualities. It is, I agree, an accessible album, and quite modern sounding album that can really sweep one into it, and I think there's enough variation to keep many Proggers interested despite Masal being a very long instrumental. I love the romanticism of some of it, and the climaxes. Some might not like the way it repeats themes, but that's a quality of much music that I like such as various classical music, soundtracks and electronic music/ Kosmische.... It's nice music to close your eyes to and just be taken along for the ride, though it can be quite intense at times and at other times very pastoral -- lovely textures and variation.

I have heard the Galgal album, but nothing since then.   

Edited by Logan - August 11 2018 at 07:09
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wanorak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2018 at 10:55
Supertramp.
A GREAT YEAR FOR PROG!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mascodagama Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2018 at 11:49
Originally posted by Logan Logan wrote:

I actually don't think that I know Ghost Rhythms and Lady With, so I have some tracking down to do.
I recommend as a starting point checking out Ghost Rhythms' Madeleine from 2015 or Lady With's The Lodge released this year. 


'Cinematic' is maybe an over-used and ambiguous term, but it fits for this stuff (and Madeleine is actually a shadow-soundtrack to Hitchock's Vertigo...).
Originally posted by Logan Logan wrote:

I have heard the Galgal album, but nothing since then.   
Well, here is a thing. I was about to say "as far as I know there's only one other album, Viens Des Quatre Vents, but it's a good one".  Then I thought I may as well check Discogs and behold - a new album issued in December last year, Paysages du Ciel.  Not only that, but according to the record label, and with the help of Google translate:
Originally posted by Label Blurb Label Blurb wrote:

"Landscapes of Heaven" is both a culmination and a new beginning. Finishing because we find the music of Jean-Paul Prat realized as ever, with a "set up" of dream: 49 musicians (piano, bass, drums, marimba, xylophone, 2 saxophones, 2 guitars, violin, 6 brass and a string orchestra - 33 musicians) What we could imagine in the two albums in quintet is here very real. This opus revives the "grandiose" of the first "John Paul Prat - Masal" - from 1982 and goes even further, especially thanks to the strings. An extremely colorful, powerful and sweet music that makes us visit our inner depths. It is also a success because the precision of the musical writing is a work of goldsmith: interweaving melodies and rhythms in the service of a daring harmony with measured dissonances. New beginning, "Paysages du Ciel" announces a complete show with choreographies, images, light ... and lets us guess the preparation of symphonic works.Small surprise: the eponymous film directed by Robin Pogorzelski who, more than a "making of "the recording, reveals us the path of the composer.
This is what they call an autobuy I think.  Will report back when the CD arrives.


Edited by Mascodagama - August 11 2018 at 12:09
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mormegil Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2018 at 14:54
Going with Supertramp for this poll.

Welcome to the middle of the film.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2018 at 14:59
Out of curiosity, did you get a chance to listen to both (or know both already)?

Edited by Logan - August 11 2018 at 15:00
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DarkTower Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 11 2018 at 20:37
 Supertramp gets my vote
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Manuel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 13 2018 at 17:22
Jean-Paul Prat gets my vote.
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Jazz-Rock/Fusion/Canterbury Team

Joined: March 12 2005
Location: Neurotica
Status: Online
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Man With Hat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 14 2018 at 16:05
This is no choice. Masal .
Dig me...But don't...Bury me
I'm running still, I shall until, one day, I hope that I'll arrive
Warning: Listening to jazz excessively can cause a laxative effect.
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