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Prog Fans in Our 60's

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    Posted: January 13 2020 at 08:21
A thread for the ageing who were too young to see prog going proto, but have experienced the genre in its heyday, intended to fill up the generation gap.

I became a prog afficionado in 1972, when I discovered Pink Floyd.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 08:36
I'm 60 and I became a prog aficionado in 1973 when I bought Mike OldField's Tubular Bells. Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Manuel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 08:43
I became a prog fan when I listened to "Stand Up" in 1972. It was such a different sound from the current hard rock scene those days, and it made me look into the then undiscovered ( for me of course)world of progressive music. Happily, I found what I was looking for, and have never been disappointed.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sean Trane Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 09:09
Originally posted by Manuel Manuel wrote:

I became a prog fan when I listened to "Stand Up" in 1972. It was such a different sound from the current hard rock scene those days, and it made me look into the then undiscovered ( for me of course)world of progressive music. Happily, I found what I was looking for, and have never been disappointed.
 
I was lucky enough that my dad bought Stand Up on the strength of Bourée when it came out (I was 6 or seven, then) so I knews of Jethro Tull (we also had This Was, on the strength of Serenade To a Cuckoo) when a kid, but I suppose that the real start was when I was 11 and bought Supertramp's Crime upon canadian release day after and within a few weeks, I had Grey & Pink, TAAB, SEBTO, ITCOTCK and a bunch more (thanks to a great store owner), which also included also Harmonium's debut a few months before Crime.
I discovered two decades later that this style/genre was called "prog"
 
So yeah, I missed the most important years (too young) but I caught the tail end of the golden age (which I will place in 79), and I will be only 57 this summer
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Snicolette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 09:20
From my intro, turning 62 in late March.  Lucky to have been an active listener and concert-goer from the early days of progressive music.  Introduced to all sorts of music in a musical family with deep roots in San Pedro, CA.  I can remember seeing The Beatles on Ed Sullivan, although I was but 6.  Older sisters distributed flyers and posters for The Bank in Torrance, CA, where Pink Floyd played during a US tour in 1968.  Their involvement piqued my interest in psychedelia, at one point I was the psychedelic buyer for a used record store in the early 80's.  My first concert was The Moody Blues, with Spirit and Trapeze opening at The Forum in 1970.  Most favourite prog bands from early days are King Crimson, Jethro Tull, The Strawbs, ELP, Procol Harum, Genesis, Yes, Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield, Gentle Giant, Family, Camel, Frank Zappa, The Moody Blues and I saw these in concert many times.  I like bands/artists that mix in other cultures as well, such as Loreena McKennitt, Dead Can Dance, Alan Stivell, The Pentangle, Fairport Convention, Athy the Electric Harper, Azam Ali and Mary Fahl.  Favourite psych and/or rock bands/artists are the US Kaleidoscope, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Fever Tree, Phil Ochs, Jefferson Airplane, Country Joe & The Fish, Pink Floyd, The Pretty Things (SF Sorrow period), Buffalo Springfield, Tim Buckley, Pearls Before Swine.  More contemporary prog acts that I enjoy are Marillion, iamthemorning, Big Big Train, Riverside, Offa Rex, plus solo efforts by the greats like Richard Thompson, Steve Hackett, Peter Gabriel.  Favourite classical composers are Debussy, Holst, Stravinsky, Vaughn Williams.  I know there are more, just top of my head stuff.  I was vice president of the second largest rock tour bus company in the US throughout the 80's.  Being situated in offices at The Village Recorder in Santa Monica, we also managed among others, Bill Ward of Black Sabbath fame and represented the rhythm section of the original Buffalo Springfield, who toured the US whilst waiting for the original band to form a reunion with those big name guys.  Most recently, I have formed a publishing company (Ghosts of Palos Verdes Music) and label (19:35 Productions) to promote my recently deceased husband's (Tom Kelly) symphonic progressive music in 3 CD/Digital releases this September.  Since I joined PA, I've been doing a lot of listening and particularly have enjoyed adding artists like Charlie Cawood, Hats Off Gentlemen, It's Adequate; Frank Wyatt & Friends, Potter's Daughter, Chasing The Monsoon, Fearful Symmetry, Dark Beauty, and Lazleitt into just a few of my favourites with some newer releases this past year.  A couple of other notable newer releases that I've enjoyed are Anthony Phillips' and Vincent Carr's latest.

Edited by Snicolette - January 13 2020 at 09:21
"Into every rain, a little life must fall." ~Tom Rapp
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote miamiscot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 11:31
I'm 57 so I cannot comment on this thread...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote kenethlevine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 11:39
finally a thread for us!  hmm forgot what I was gonna say  Embarrassed
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 12:42
I'm 64.5 y.o., and was hooked the moment I heard the Mellotrons on ITCOTCK in 1969!   

Many prog classics were on regular rotation on Chicago AM radio, including Yes's "Roundabout," Focus "Hocus Pocus," and ELP's "From the Beginning."  I went to see Yes in concert on 22 Sept 1972, not having heard CTTE beforehand (I was fully expecting to hear "America.")  Well, I was in for a surprise!

Age doth have its advantages....I saw LTIA live, BSS tour twice, Relayer twice (missed TFTO dammit!), Focus, Weather Report with Jaco etc.  There are no words to describe the magnificence of many of these shows!  I only wish they had filmed much more of them.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Snicolette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 12:48
Yes, not as many films or photos back in those days.

"Into every rain, a little life must fall." ~Tom Rapp
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 14:16
Well..I'm 68....I started before anything was called prog.....I suppose the first full blown prog thing was ITCOTCK (1969) in very early 1970...at least that's when I bought it. But I was already listening to Moody Blues, Traffic, Procol Harum, The Nice, Floyd, etc.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (2) Thanks(2)   Quote dwill123 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 16:38
I just turned 65 and I became aware in 1970 when I was the first in my school to get a just released copy of "Emerson, Lar and Palmer".  I had a break out year in 1971 when I saw the same ELP at the Fillmore East.  I later followed that up by seeing Yes in the summer opening for Mountain and Humble Pie in Gaelic Park in the Bronx.  That same year caught Pink Floyd at the Central Theater in Passaic, NJ.  I finished off 1971 with the concert that still may be the best put together show I've seen.  Headliner was Procol Harum.  the opening act was Yes with a new keyboardist (Rick Wakeman) followed by the second opening act King Crimson.  49 years later and still hanging with prog.  Looking forward to the next 49.

Edited by dwill123 - January 13 2020 at 16:39
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 17:13
Originally posted by Snicolette Snicolette wrote:

Yes, not as many films or photos back in those days.


But there is a lot of music, and too much of it is not considered this or that and is not valued, because there was no press/media in America that appreciated it ... specially as some of the bands were considered anti-establishment and were being given some really bad comments in a lot of places ... and eventually a lot of that music was "killed" and not "heard" by the majority of folks ... and that some bands survived it and maintained their status was ... a bit lucky, and also ... they believed in their music and work.

I'm not sure we need a film, or photo ... of Quicksilver Messenger Service, or Spirit, or Jefferson Airplane, or Grateful Dead (specially!!!) to appreciate some of the great stuff and shows they did ... the music is out there, and the number of bootlegs on them at the time, was insane, and a proof that something was happening ... and you did not need flowers in your hair to see it or show it ... !

Recently, I have been listening to some early Quicksilver, and I have to admit ... it was a very nice and enjoyable listen ... and a lot less "composed" than a lot of European stuff ... which was more interesting and fun for my imagination. 

PF was, for me, already 2nd generation, since its first 2 albums were not really that well known here in the West Coast ... and honestly, I never got into them, or heard them, until hearing Ummagumma sometime in 1971, and by that time, I had all the other albums by everyone else in my collection, and it was the words on the bootlegs by Pink Floyd (they had an incredible amount of them!), that got me to check out the first 2 albums and Syd Barrett ... that we missed, but I never heard any PF in Southern California until Guy Guden started ripping it up before DSOTM with the previous 3 albums!

JT was fine with me, and I had heard them and appreciated a lot of their work in Madison, so I knew of them in 1969 ... but while highly enjoyable, at parties and everyone digging it, I really thought that Fairport Convention was way better ... but the "bad rap" in California when we moved was ... that it was not about rock music ... and it relegated FC to the back burner that was broke!

The one that was getting a lot of attention, and had for a long time, was Frank Zappa, which at the time, was really difficult to get into ... since his material with the Mothers, was so different, and made so much fun of the commercial everything ... something that is way too visible and sick in LA because of its repetition ... and ons gets tired of _______ and his dog Spot ... real quick ... but what Frank did, musically, was valued, and I (personally) did not need John Lennon to tell me that it was great stuff ... I was already listening to it, although I did not buy my first album until the following year with Chunga's Revenge ... I heard King Kong by another band called Babe Ruth ... and it hooked me well.

There are a lot of "moments" i enjoyed and talk about here every now and then, but a couple of folks do not believe that history was alive in other places, because London wrote the book ... and the rest of the world was not discovered then ... something I find totally sad, having seen a lot of music in Brazil in the 1960's and being extremely aware of Portuguese music in the 1950's. 

I did not believe, and still don't ... that it was all ... just pop music, even though it took the sales of it to make it so ... the music was alive before the sales! AND, the Internet today is proving this ... left and right ... 


Edited by moshkito - January 13 2020 at 17:30
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote kenethlevine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 17:50
very first prog band I got into was Procol Harum in late 1974 at 16.  It was via my older brother's interest in lead guitar in general and Robin Trower in particular.  On the underground-ish bilingual FM station in Montreal that I was starting to listen to with him, "Conquistador" (live) came on and he said that it had Robin Trower on guitar.  Turns out it didn't but that was probably the first love as a consciously album oriented listener (though it was a big hit single as well).   I then bought their first album and was bowled over by it.  It's quite unique in their discography and it remains my favorite.  

I wasn't as into the guitar hero stuff but my brother also had an ear for more sensitive music, so he introduced me to Strawbs via the glorious "Benedictus" and beyond.  From there it wasn't long before early King Crimson, Camel, Barclay James Harvest, Moody Blues, Mike Oldfield, and Renaissance all got added in.  By 1976 prog was briefly more mainstream with Alan Parsons Project hitting the mark with their first 2 albums and Genesis producing material more accessible than the PG era (though I loved Selling England).  It wasn't until I heard a recorded concert of Steeleye Span on the radio in 1977 that the Celtic prog shoe really dropped, and soon it was on to Steeleye, Horslips, Jethro Tull and beyond.  I was also into more serious if not prog artists like Cat Stevens.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Snicolette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 18:30
Nice that this thread got started, I'd posted in the 50's age one, thinking no one would start up a 60's one.  Fun to see what others in my decade heard first and how and how many of us also continued diverging yet also keeping tabs on the progressive side.

"Into every rain, a little life must fall." ~Tom Rapp
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AFlowerKingCrimson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 22:03
Nikki, no Rush on your list. Shame on you. :P ;)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Snicolette Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 13 2020 at 22:12
That's ok, just my perspective from the time. In retrospect, I see the value.
"Into every rain, a little life must fall." ~Tom Rapp
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mudpuppy64 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2020 at 07:11
Jethro Tull did it for me . First time i heard them i was hooked . They have been my Favourite Band ever since 1970 .
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Psychedelic Paul Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2020 at 08:33
Barclay James Harvest and Camel were two of the earliest prog bands I was in to around about 1974, but it would be another 20 years before I "discovered" Pink Floyd and another 45 years before I discovered the Canterbury Scene. Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ColinCool Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2020 at 10:00
I turned 65 last December. My first introduction to prog was listening to In the Wake of Poseidon & Black Sabbath's 1st in a friend's house way back in 1970. I was hooked from that day. I also remember being introduced to Pink Floyd in 1971 when we were asked to bring records to school - think it was for an English lesson! Someone brought in Meddle & played One of these Days & it blew me away, even more so when I bought it & heard Echoes!! Pink Floyd's back catalogue soon followed into my collection.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 14 2020 at 11:40
Originally posted by Mudpuppy64 Mudpuppy64 wrote:

Jethro Tull did it for me . First time i heard them i was hooked . They have been my Favourite Band ever since 1970 .

Me too....first heard This Was in early '69, and then Stand Up...became an instant fan...my friend Bill was really into blues rock and he loved Tull.
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