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Top 10 Influential Albums from Teenage Years

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The Anders View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Anders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Top 10 Influential Albums from Teenage Years
    Posted: January 27 2021 at 10:30
I had to think a bit about it, but I think these meant the most to me:

BjŲrk - Post
David Bowie - Station to Station
The Clash - London Calling
C.V. JÝrgensen - Tidens tern
Kashmir - The Good Life
Pink Floyd - The Dark Side of the Moon
Radiohead - OK Computer
R.E.M. - Automatic for the People
Sebastian - BlÝd lykke
Talking Heads - Fear of Music
The Who - Tommy


Edited by The Anders - January 27 2021 at 10:31
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dwill123 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 27 2021 at 05:25
This one took me a long time to compile (and I still had to fudge an 11th pick).  The only album on my list I didn't initially play a lot was "In the Court of the Crimson King" but the influence it had on me was immense (even though I didn't get it until much later).  The rest of the albums I wore out to almost unplayable condition.

Jimi Hendrix - Band of Gypsies
Mahavishnu Orchestra - The Inner Mounting Flame
King Crimson - In the Court of the Crimson King
Curtis Mayfield - Curtis
Sly and the Family Stone - Stand!
Lee Michaels - Lee Michaels
Joe Walsh - Barnstorm
Yes - The Yes Album
Emerson, Lake & Palmer - Tarkus
Funkadelic - Funkadelic
Pink Floyd - Meddle
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nick_h_nz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 27 2021 at 04:37
Originally posted by Ronstein Ronstein wrote:

Originally posted by dr wu23 dr wu23 wrote:

Well being one of the oldest on the forum...my teenage years were from 64-69 and I and my brother didn't have much money to buy albums but we were influenced by the British Invasion bands like the Beatles, Kinks, Stones, Who,  Cream, etc...but we also were into the American ones like The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, Hendrix, Credence Clearwater, Grateful Dead, Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, etc.
We mostly bought 45's back then and had a good sized stack.

As one 'old fart' to another (and I'm sure Steve will join in too), let me pose you a question that's always in the back of my mind when perusing these forums. We discuss and appreciate a huge amount of music that was created in the 10 years between (let's say) 1967 and 1976. Surely those of us who are post -war babies must have a different perspective on this music that the majority who were born later, simply because we were hearing this music at the point when it arrived in the world and there was nothing like it before. If you listen to progressive music from the perspective of finding the likes of Porcupine Tree, Flower Kings, Haken etc. etc. and then looking back, you're looking at the original music through the lens of those that have followed and been influenced by the original and that uniqueness is lost. Therefore it seems to me that us oldies are surely going to judge music differently. 

I agree completely about judging the music differently, but not so much with not recognising the originality and uniqueness. I was born in 1975, when the ďclassicĒ period of prog was largely over, and I still find the uniqueness and originality obvious and palpable, even though I came to the classic period years after it had happened.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Blacksword Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 27 2021 at 03:27
I turned 13 in 1982, so I'll try and restrict this to albums I heard between 1982 and 1989, although sitting just outside that top ten are three albums which I first heard in 1981, which deserve a mention, as their impact on me became more significant in the years that followed..

Architecture & Morality - OMD
Tin Drum - Japan
Dare - The Human League

Beyond that..

The Wall - Pink Floyd
Number of the beast - Iron Maiden
Ace of Spades - Motorhead
Script for a Jesters Tear - Marillion
Exit stage Left - Rush
A Trick of the tail - Genesis
And then there were three - Genesis
Once around the world - It Bites
God's own Medicine - The Mission
Kiss me Kiss me Kiss me - The Cure

There's dozens more, but this'll do for now..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ronstein Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 27 2021 at 02:24
Originally posted by dr wu23 dr wu23 wrote:

Well being one of the oldest on the forum...my teenage years were from 64-69 and I and my brother didn't have much money to buy albums but we were influenced by the British Invasion bands like the Beatles, Kinks, Stones, Who,  Cream, etc...but we also were into the American ones like The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, Hendrix, Credence Clearwater, Grateful Dead, Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, etc.
We mostly bought 45's back then and had a good sized stack.

As one 'old fart' to another (and I'm sure Steve will join in too), let me pose you a question that's always in the back of my mind when perusing these forums. We discuss and appreciate a huge amount of music that was created in the 10 years between (let's say) 1967 and 1976. Surely those of us who are post -war babies must have a different perspective on this music that the majority who were born later, simply because we were hearing this music at the point when it arrived in the world and there was nothing like it before. If you listen to progressive music from the perspective of finding the likes of Porcupine Tree, Flower Kings, Haken etc. etc. and then looking back, you're looking at the original music through the lens of those that have followed and been influenced by the original and that uniqueness is lost. Therefore it seems to me that us oldies are surely going to judge music differently. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 26 2021 at 16:36
from albums I heard for the first time between 1975 -1981

The Who - By Numbers
Wings - Band On The Run
ELP - Pictures at An Exhibition
ELP- Tarkus
ELP - BSS
ELP - Live Triple
Tubeway Army - Replicas
Sky - Sky 2
Pink Floyd - The Wall
Rush - Exit Stage Left

that was enough to prime me for prog. Never cared for punk and new wave that much aside from a few odd singles.

EDIT - That Rush album came out 1982 so I was probably just out of my teenage years , I could replace it with more ELP.

Didn't get serious about prog until my late twenties as I vaguely remember. Until then ELP were mainly it for me.


Edited by richardh - January 26 2021 at 16:40
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 26 2021 at 14:09
Well being one of the oldest on the forum...my teenage years were from 64-69 and I and my brother didn't have much money to buy albums but we were influenced by the British Invasion bands like the Beatles, Kinks, Stones, Who,  Cream, etc...but we also were into the American ones like The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, Hendrix, Credence Clearwater, Grateful Dead, Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, etc.
We mostly bought 45's back then and had a good sized stack.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 21 2021 at 09:26
Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

^^^

So this is interesting, I had a roughly similar conversation elsewhere couple of days back. My point then too was that well, we musophiles may be a minority but there are many of us in absolute numbers. So the fact that a lot of people keep going back to the same music mat also indicate a lack of engagement with other curiosity about music in general. That they associate music strongly with their own personality and therefore go back to what they heard in their formative years as these hold important life memories for them. People like us OTOH have listened to so much music by now that we are no longer able to pinpoint just what was going on in our life when we discovered XYZ album.

Thatís definitely true to a certain extent, and yet there are notable exceptions. I couldnít tell you when or where I first heard most of the music in my collection, but there are certain albums I can. They tend to be the ones Iíve listed here (or in my corollary pre-teens) thread, and most of them are far from being favourite albums, but damn if I canít deny how influential they were.

But as I write that, I realise that it is really only those early years where I can remember exactly when and where I discovered an album. Again, there are exceptions, but they seem to become fewer as the years go by. I can remember the first hip hop album I bought, because it was such a different thing to be in my collection. I didnít consider it a guilty pleasure as such, but I did almost feel guilty for liking it, as if I shouldnít be allowed to enjoy it (sort of a feeling of cultural appropriation,if that makes sense), because none of my friends or family liked hip hop. I was kind of a generation out from it being a universal thing, so while it was popular in NZ, it was largely within the Māori and Pacific Island communities. Now, of course, everyone listens to hip hop.

Similarly, I can remember buying my first Opeth album (Ghost Reveries) because it was a bit of an achievement of sorts. For years I had been trying to get past my aversion (and sometimes almost disgust) of harsh vocals. I had friends who loved a lot of extreme metal who kept assuring me I would like a lot of it, if I didnít keep turning off because of the vocals. And the truth is, I knew they were right, because whenever I got into their car or walked into their home and the music was playing, Iíd often think it was awesome - until someone started singing/growling. Iím not going to lie and say I enjoy harsh vocals now, but I can definitely tolerate them, and I now have quite a lot of extreme metal in my collection. Opeth was my gateway drug, so it makes sense I remember when I bought it.

But all the hundreds of other bands and albums I have loved and bought? No idea what was going on when I discovered them.....


Yeah...on similar lines, I remember particular albums/songs that sort of represented 'breakthroughs' in my exploration of music.  Like the first time I heard Ride The Lightning, completely by accident.  I wasn't prepared for something so heavy, having only just been initiated into hard rock like Scorpions/Van Halen.  It hit me like a ton of bricks. But I wanted more of this thing that wasn't like anything I had heard before and so began my foray into extreme metal and heavy music generally.  Likewise, the first time I heard Firth of the Fifth was extremely memorable.  But I couldn't tell you when I got into Canterbury bands, as much as I love those albums too, because they all happened during a three-four year phase when I explored a lot of 70s prog.  I also can't pinpoint any specific inflection points with regard to jazz. It's just crept up into my system and, at this point, into my bloodstream.  It feels like the most natural thing to do now to listen to jazz but I hadn't even heard REAL jazz (aka NOT Kenny G Wink) for a very long time so I don't even know how this happened.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote geekfreak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 21 2021 at 03:48
Incredibly interesting concept of finding out the verification process of the teenage years of the members here. As it is a sound bite of my musical teenage influences, Iíll have to give it some deep thinking and returning to. Post!!!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nick_h_nz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 21 2021 at 02:49
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

^^^

So this is interesting, I had a roughly similar conversation elsewhere couple of days back. My point then too was that well, we musophiles may be a minority but there are many of us in absolute numbers. So the fact that a lot of people keep going back to the same music mat also indicate a lack of engagement with other curiosity about music in general. That they associate music strongly with their own personality and therefore go back to what they heard in their formative years as these hold important life memories for them. People like us OTOH have listened to so much music by now that we are no longer able to pinpoint just what was going on in our life when we discovered XYZ album.

Thatís definitely true to a certain extent, and yet there are notable exceptions. I couldnít tell you when or where I first heard most of the music in my collection, but there are certain albums I can. They tend to be the ones Iíve listed here (or in my corollary pre-teens) thread, and most of them are far from being favourite albums, but damn if I canít deny how influential they were.

But as I write that, I realise that it is really only those early years where I can remember exactly when and where I discovered an album. Again, there are exceptions, but they seem to become fewer as the years go by. I can remember the first hip hop album I bought, because it was such a different thing to be in my collection. I didnít consider it a guilty pleasure as such, but I did almost feel guilty for liking it, as if I shouldnít be allowed to enjoy it (sort of a feeling of cultural appropriation,if that makes sense), because none of my friends or family liked hip hop. I was kind of a generation out from it being a universal thing, so while it was popular in NZ, it was largely within the Māori and Pacific Island communities. Now, of course, everyone listens to hip hop.

Similarly, I can remember buying my first Opeth album (Ghost Reveries) because it was a bit of an achievement of sorts. For years I had been trying to get past my aversion (and sometimes almost disgust) of harsh vocals. I had friends who loved a lot of extreme metal who kept assuring me I would like a lot of it, if I didnít keep turning off because of the vocals. And the truth is, I knew they were right, because whenever I got into their car or walked into their home and the music was playing, Iíd often think it was awesome - until someone started singing/growling. Iím not going to lie and say I enjoy harsh vocals now, but I can definitely tolerate them, and I now have quite a lot of extreme metal in my collection. Opeth was my gateway drug, so it makes sense I remember when I bought it.

But all the hundreds of other bands and albums I have loved and bought? No idea what was going on when I discovered them.....

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 21 2021 at 01:00
^^^

So this is interesting, I had a roughly similar conversation elsewhere couple of days back. My point then too was that well, we musophiles may be a minority but there are many of us in absolute numbers. So the fact that a lot of people keep going back to the same music mat also indicate a lack of engagement with other curiosity about music in general. That they associate music strongly with their own personality and therefore go back to what they heard in their formative years as these hold important life memories for them. People like us OTOH have listened to so much music by now that we are no longer able to pinpoint just what was going on in our life when we discovered XYZ album.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nick_h_nz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 21:59
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

I tend not to set too much store to that or similar theories as I only began to literally gorge on rock and related music (and, thereafter, jazz) in my twenties.  It wasn't until three years back or so that I finally began to listen to hip hop. Of course, it's possible the internet has upended such theories because it's just easier to know now what the possibilities of music are at the click of a mouse. That would have been harder back in the day and would have also cost money.  You can also find 'genre experts' to recommend the right albums to get into a genre/sub genre...such as on this website. 

For sure! I donít hold to the theory at all. My own musical life doesnít fi with the theory, and nor it seems do the musical lives of most who have posted in this thread.

It is only in trispect, when making my list, that I realised how influential the albums I listed were. And definitely not all of them were favourites, and have never become so. I do think itís important to recognise that, though not mutually exclusive by any means, a list of favourite albums can (and probably will be quite different from a list of influential albums.

It was definitely years after my teens that I started getting really into certain genres, and exploring beyond the mainstream, the theory that what you listen to in your twenties is what you listen to from then on is definitely not true for me, either. My tastes have become broader and broader with age. Iím listening to extreme metal that I wouldnít have touched with a barge pole in my twenties, and ambient music that would have bored me silly (as just two examples).

And while I agree with your observation that the internet has made it easier to broaden ones horizons, I wonder if the theory does still hold some water when it comes to the general populous. No one on this forum has ďnormalĒ music tastes, a s we are very much outliers.

If I look at almost everyone I know (friends, families and acquaintances), I suspect the theory would fit them perfectly. They are all listening to the same sort of music they were listening to in their 20s. For some, itís not just this SMW music, but the same artists. Others area still finding new artists to listen to, but they fall in the same range of what they were already listen to.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 18:37
I tend not to set too much store to that or similar theories as I only began to literally gorge on rock and related music (and, thereafter, jazz) in my twenties.  It wasn't until three years back or so that I finally began to listen to hip hop. Of course, it's possible the internet has upended such theories because it's just easier to know now what the possibilities of music are at the click of a mouse. That would have been harder back in the day and would have also cost money.  You can also find 'genre experts' to recommend the right albums to get into a genre/sub genre...such as on this website. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BrufordFreak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 11:28
Mt biggest influences in my pre-teen years was the music my parents loved: The Beatles, Sergio Mendez & Brazil 66, Herb Albert, The Carpenters & Burt Bacharach. Then I became an AM (and later, FM) radio addict, listening to hours of CKLW Top 30 hits and early 1970s soul/R&B. Then my brother came home from school with tons of new music, of which Uriah Heep Demons and Wizards really cracked wide open the door to my prog sensibilities.

The 10 albums from my teen years that probably formed my musical sensibilities more than any others:

Uriah Heep Demons and Wizards
America America
Marvin Gaye What's Going On
Carly Simon Greatest Hits
Steely Dan Pretzel Logic
Yes Relayer
Nektar Remember the Future
Genesis A Trick of the Tail
Supertramp Even in the Quietest Moments
Pink Floyd Dark Side of the Moon



Edited by BrufordFreak - January 20 2021 at 11:28
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AlanB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:50
Argus - Wishbone Ash, still my all time favourite album
The Slider - T Rex, one of the first albums I bought
Mirage - Camel, released when I was a teenager but I didn't hear it until later
The Yes Album - likewise
Machine Head - Deep Purple
Dark Side of the Moon

That's probably about it for me
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cristi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:47
Metallica - the 80s
Queen - II/ANATO/Jazz/The Game
Queensryche - Empire
King Diamond - Fatal Portrait/Abigail/Conspiracy
Iron Maiden - debut to Fear of the Dark
Deep Purple - In Rock/Machine Head/Stormbringer/and a compilation - Deepest Purple, perfect place to start exploring this band
Black Sabbath - debut/Paranoid/Vol IV/Master of Reality
Helloween - the Kiske years
Kreator - Pleasure to Kill/Terrible Certainty/Coma of Souls
Testament - PWYP/SoB/The Ritual

and many others Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Nogbad_The_Bad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:23
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by Nogbad_The_Bad Nogbad_The_Bad wrote:

I should probably add I was listening to quite a lot of punkier stuff in my teens

Joy Division - Closer
Fischer Z - Word Salad
Stiff Little Fingers - Inflammable Material
Devo - Are We Not Men?
Stranglers - No More Heroes
Yes, but all good stuff.

Oh yeah, I still like all this stuff.Thumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SteveG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:11
Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:



Good one SteveG†Thumbs Up
Here are mine:
- Steppenwolf double live.
- Son of Dracula, Harry Nilsson s/t.
- Cheap Thrills, Janis Joplin.
- Jefferson Airplane, Surrealistic Pillows.
- Deep Purple, In Rock
- Led Zeppelin, debut.
- Jimi Hendrix: Bold as Love.
- Sparks, Kimono My House.
- Skyhooks, Living in the '70s (Aussie rock band).
- Grateful Dead, debut.

oh yeah, the classics!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote triptych Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:04

Good one SteveG Thumbs Up
Here are mine:
- Steppenwolf double live.
- Son of Dracula, Harry Nilsson s/t.
- Cheap Thrills, Janis Joplin.
- Jefferson Airplane, Surrealistic Pillows.
- Deep Purple, In Rock
- Led Zeppelin, debut.
- Jimi Hendrix: Bold as Love.
- Sparks, Kimono My House.
- Skyhooks, Living in the '70s (Aussie rock band).
- Grateful Dead, debut.


Edited by triptych - January 20 2021 at 07:05
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SteveG Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2021 at 06:18
Originally posted by Nogbad_The_Bad Nogbad_The_Bad wrote:

I should probably add I was listening to quite a lot of punkier stuff in my teens

Joy Division - Closer
Fischer Z - Word Salad
Stiff Little Fingers Inflammable Material
Devo - Are We Not Men?
Stranglers - No More Heroes
Yes, but all good stuff.
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