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avestin View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Troisième Rive - Banlieues
    Posted: November 12 2007 at 16:49
TROISIÈME RIVE - Banlieues
 
With Troisième Rive it’s hard to find any details about the band, its members and background. All that is known to yours truly, is that it is a (sextet/whatever) of French musicians which released this semi melancholic / semi cheerful folk album in 1978. With a clear, pleasant vocal the singer (Jean-Pierre Balland) is at the forefront of the music accompanied by the usual rock instruments plus an accordion which gives the music some of its charm and the fragrance of French folk music. This is a charming warm and delightful album. Recommended (a good addition to your collection but not essential).
 
 
 
 
TROISIÈME RIVE — Banlieues
Review by Nao/Gilles (René-Gilles Deberdt)

5%20stars This has to be my all-time favorite French progressive album. (I also love Nino Ferrer's Metronomies but it's not on ProgArchives...)

Nostalgic melodies, socially-relevant lyrics and very interesting vocals all merge together into an experience that is so overwhelming it's almost unbelievable that it has remained an extremely confidential release--even here in France! If you're interested in reading a discussion in French about the album and the band, including some snippets from people previously from the band (or close to them), you might want to check out this page: fox.cyna.fr/4773/troisieme-rive/

Fans of Banlieues will REALLY want to check out Megot's (aka Maurice Boguet's) album "Ballades pour nous" (aka "Ballade pour nous", don't ask me why), which featured the same lineup and has a couple of excellent songs that would perfectly fit on Banlieues. You can order this album on CD-R directly from the artist at www.megot.com

Posted Monday, September 17, 2007, 08:17 EST
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TROISIÈME RIVE — Banlieues
Review by oracus (Nikolaos Mavrikakis)

4%20stars 4.5 Stars More than an excellent addition to any prog music collection

I don't know why Assaf think that this is not a must have album. I think that Banlieues is brillian melancholic album that will fulfil in maximum your prog folk expectations.

The first think that grab your attention is the wonderful deep and sad voice of Jean- Pierre Balland that reminds me Dominique Le Guennec from Mona Lisa. But Jean-Pierre Balland's voice is softer and even more melancholic. The second wonderful ingredient is the accordion playing that adds a marvelous folky sad feeling in the album. The music is excellent composed and performed and there are not weak points. I must mention the amazing acoustic guitar playing that accompanying the devine voice of Jean-Pierre Balland. The electric guitar playing some wonderfull gentle parts also. For the first time after along time my neck hair stood up after hearing the desperate growl in the end of the title track. Incedible. You have to listen this obscure gem.

Posted Thursday, May 17, 2007, 09:41 EST
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2007 at 11:00
Assaf,
 
This GREAT album will be reviewed by yours trully before the end of the weekBig%20smile
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 13 2007 at 23:15
^^^
Great, looking forward.
 
Love that French sound they have, somewhat taking from folk and chanson Francaise and molding it into their own vision of music making.
 
 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: November 15 2007 at 04:48
Originally posted by avestin avestin wrote:

^^^
Great, looking forward.
 
Love that French sound they have, somewhat taking from folk and chanson Francaise and molding it into their own vision of music making.
 
 
 
Yes, Baklland's vocals sounds a bit like the early Julien Clerc
 
 
 
 
 
Here goes:
 
TROISIÈME RIVE — Banlieues
Review by Sean Trane (Hugues Chantraine)
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5%20stars An incredible one shot in the world of progressive folk rock, a bit like Ripaille (but more trad than medieval), Troisième Rive’s sole album is one hell of a find in its vinyl form, having never received a legit CD re-issue (no matter what Poor House has you out to believe), and this is even more unbelievable the Musea label actually has gone by it without detecting it so far. This sextet, not including lead singer JP Balland, made a veryt delicate folk rock album that deserves to be rated amongst the best of France and even Europe. Behind a superb but nightmarish artwork, it came out on the ultra-small Iris label and disappeared inn the rear of record shop, like expected given its released date of 78. To give you an idea on how this album is tremendous, even this writer manages to forget his lifelong hatred of accordion and even liking what it actually adds to this album.

Right from the first guitar strums and the great bass, you’d guess that you’re not far away from Quebecois Richard Seguin, especially once he hits the suburbs (banlieues) of Vancouver just before hitting Bilbao’s. The solid group behind Balland gives an excellent musically narrative thread on which his lyrics just glide effortlessly over the accordion-lead bass rhythm track that sounds like pure heaven in folk terms, and Balland’s throat scrapping leading in the final guitar solo is marvellous. The very precious Le Petit Jeu is one of the many highlight where Balland’s quivering voice (this reminds of Julien Clerc’s early career with his debut in the Haïr musical) over delicate guitar arpeggios is reminiscent of early Genesis’ folk roots. The Spanish-sounding Amalia (this writer’s main scientific project is also called that) is a great upbeat track that avoids the Flamenco clichés and another great moment. The more ambitious (lyrically anyway) Ballade is not exactly the more enthusiasting track of the album,

The flipside holds only two tracks, both separated in three sections, which indeed augurs for the proggiest of folk. The XX-mins Légende is a spell-binding track starting out on electric guitar arpeggios, loud muffled sounds before segueing into quiet quivering vocals over a clear piano, but as the vocal attacks its second, there are a few bursts, triggering the drama floodgates with harpsichord, Hackettian guitars and the full shebang…. Outstanding and sending chills down your spine, spreading goose bumps all- over. Of course the best Genesis moments are not far away from this, but there is that French dimension that brings a tad more of “je-ne-sais-quoi” to it. The wild third movement of this track gave the name of the group and is a fitting finale to the album’s apex. The three-part 6-minutes Chateau has a hard time succeeding to Légende, but somehow manages fairly well. The short and sweet Douves (moats) slowly evolves into a wilder and louder Herse (port-cullis) and finally ends in the

Certainly one of France’s best folk album, Troisième Rive remains one of the best kept secret from its country and will likely remain so unless some daring prog label will make the not-so-daring choice to release it. Awesome, beautiful and solemn piece of wax.

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