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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Make A Rising - Rip Through The Hawk Black Night
    Posted: March 28 2008 at 16:25
MAKE A RISING — Rip Through The Hawk Black Night
 
 
 
 
 
 
From their website:
"

BIO

Tunneling its way out of the West Philadelphia nether worlds Make A Rising is a band that is beyond unique. The quintet’s debut record is a swirling mix of violin, keyboard, guitars, drums, saxophone, trumpet, bells, whistles, and assorted noisemakers – all swelling together for subversively addictive pop gems. With orchestral crescendos combined with off-kilter vocals and fast-changing tempos Make A Rising is the sound of chaos, bliss, bravado, nerves and naivety – avant chamber rock at its most dynamic – like Daniel Johnston singing Beach Boys songs interpreted by Naked City.

 
 
 
 
MAKE A RISING — Rip Through The Hawk Black Night
Review by mecca

— First review of this album —

4%20stars Within the first three minutes of their debut record, Rip Through the Hawk Black Night, Make a Rising already gives a cautionary sign to listeners that their music isn't constricted to tight structures or silly things called genres. The first section of the first song, for instance, is a quasi-a cappella quickly checkered by beats of shattering glass, witty sax, and gypsy-esque piano, then quickly joined by violin... the sounds walk off the stage. Those beautiful vocals arrive again accompanied by harmonizing keys, and dissonant chimes with sax soon to nightmarishly contort the dream-like consonance introducing a short, abrupt crescendo of raucous purportions. STOP. Cliffs and free-falls start here, a fight between a soft, melodic piano and the sister crescendos. Slowly the music fades away to a rhythmic ambience...

...A hawk and a train pass through my ears, and then errupts an entirely new musical anthem... which after a mere 15 seconds dies as well. Listeners may find these abrupt swellings unsatisfying, but after listening to the album AS A WHOLE, they will come to understand why they actually work. In fact, this song is a good representation of the entire album. Songs by themselves are very uneven, one song in particular finds its climax in the last 45 seconds, it's a four minute song in its entirety. But don't let that detract from your interest because I haven't told you the most important reason for all of this.

Songs shouldn't really be considered songs by Make a Rising, think of them more as suites... every song on this album connects in some form or another, and they all complete eachother. Rip Through the Hawk Black Night isn't just some group of songs, they're intricately placed SECTIONS of an entire album. That climax I mentioned in the four minute song?, that leads directly to a beautifully ugly upsurge in the beginning of the following song. It also helps that there are no choruses or set structures in any of the songs, though they are meticulously crafted via through-compositions (like their second album, Infinite Ellipse and Head with Open Fontanel).

The first song also helps describe general instrumentation of their music, very little of it is focused on guitar. In fact, there isn't really any main instrument within their music whatsoever, but it includes piano, trumpet, clarinet, violin, bass, percussion (not just drums, make note), and the aforementioned guitar. Production and mixing aren't the best either, making it sometimes hard to hear the drumming in particular, but that could have been for artistic reasons.

If you truly want something new, please check this out. MAR is sure deserving of some more fans.

Report this review (#165244) | Posted Friday, March 28, 2008, 14:51 EST
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Edited by avestin - March 28 2008 at 21:09
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 29 2008 at 10:54
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 30 2008 at 11:45
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 04 2008 at 17:59
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 04 2008 at 20:37
Thanks for the tip! Big%20smile
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 05 2008 at 21:23
I posted this in the RIO thread as well:
 
 
I am right now writing my review for their album but I will take more time and give it a few more days to see what comes up more in my mind.
 
This is one of the hardest reviews I've got to write since it is so hard to pinpoint their sound, as I find them to be quite unique and original.
 
I usually don't do this as it's not my style but I figure that if Kayo Dot receives such hype why not MAR which are as worthy of such high regard.
 
This is a FABULOUS album, one of the most creative I've heard in recent years, a fantastic release, a must for fans of everyhing creative and progressive (not necessarily avant-rock).
 
GET IT!!!
 
 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 08 2008 at 13:09
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 08 2008 at 13:15
It sounds good, so far.Smile
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 08 2008 at 16:06
MAKE A RISING — Infinite Ellipse And Head With Open Fontanel
Review by mecca

5%20stars EXCELLENT.

The album begins (Sneffels Yokul), like their debut, with harmonic a capella, then breaking off into an amusing rhythm (amusing rhythms can be found all throughout the album, some really great percussion here) accompanied with an organic, colorful bass melody. It keeps at a nice pace and then suddenly pulls out the butcher's knife to show off the band's more aggressive tendencies. As quickly and as chillingly as the crescendo arrived, it disappears into the former world-music-esque visage... and then that disappears as well and introduces a solo piano (not solo-ING, just alone) playing one of the many hair-raising bittersweet melodies from this extraordinarily SYMBOLIC album (pun intended-- as the album title is really only two symbols).

From there, All One or None continues with haunting piano and a mixture of falsetto and baritone singing. The song is divided mostly in two sections, the first that I already mentioned, and then changing again adding melodic percussion along with the final words that really got to me: All my friends are here--they shouldn't move away, providing some daunting, dramatic irony. This is a slower, shorter ditty with a lasting impression on the album, especially with it's placement right after the upbeat and angry Snuffels Yokul.

Peaceful Paths begins thereafter with more of that disturbing lonely piano and tears open into an overwhelming, BIG-sounding chamber arrangement. After flirting with some pop-influence of repeating, Peaceful paths don't lead astray, it returns to chamber slowly building up and down through whooshes of rapid drumming and beautiful violin. Then as the chamber-music character walks, he falls into a cleverly-built trap!--a nightmarish and dissonant climax, falling back to a soft death including what I think is an accordion to end the violent and deadly rollercoaster.

The penultimate song on the album is the epic and wandering How's 'Bout a Love Supreme, which introduces itself calmly with piano and vocals. Within the next minute, the song evaporates in an ambient solution of animal noises, drones, echoes, and percussion, seemingly never to take its former state again. But it does for a short while. After this short lapse of harmony, jarring dissonance erupts out of the song's previous calm confines and soon resembles the soundtrack of some insane movie. Somewhat of a distraught and depressing happiness (similar to the crescendos of Peaceful Paths and Bradford Big Boatride). Woodsong Part Two comes afterward, following suit to Woodsong Part One's quirky, classical method. Trumpet succeeds and the album closes. Somewhat. Not really. You'll see.

Anyways, like I said, this is an amazing, amazing, amazing, amazing album. It's a beautiful patchwork of different sounds and textures. More energy than their debut, and many gentle and soft points in the album that give me goosebumps. You'll find tons of amazing orchestration including an array of many, many instruments. Highly recommended.

What do I know? What do I know?

Nothing. Nothing.

P.S. Buy this album when it comes out April 8th, this year!

Report this review (#165720) | Posted Friday, April 04, 2008, 18:03 EST
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MAKE A RISING — Infinite Ellipse And Head With Open Fontanel
Review by avestin (Assaf Vestin)
Special Collaborator Zeuhl/RIO/Avant Team

4%20stars Music that words can’t describe

This is a sentence I come across often when listening, writing or talking about the bands and musicians I listen to. Not only is it hard (or almost impossible) to pinpoint then into specific genres (one will almost always not be enough) but to actually describe what they play is a daunting task for me. And this is before I said anything about it being good or bad. In this case, it’s very good. It’s even brilliant! This album has many of what I adore about music. It’s refreshing, original, varied, interchanging, dynamic, explorative and experimental. It’s all that, plus well played, well structured and appealing melodies. That’s it, you can stop reading here and go listen to their music on their website and myspace and listen for yourselves. Or you can continue to read on if you want to know more.

But to come back to the issue, if there ever was a band I couldn’t write easily about, describing their sound and style, Make A Rising would be it. A band that has come to create a sound of their own, which while making some references to other bands, is quite unique and very original in their approach and in their musical output. Filled with contrasts and twists, it is music that I love to listen to as it’s filled with fun – not fun in the sense of goofy or humoristic music but fun in the sense that I feel uplifted listening to it. I am at a loss for words to describe their music; it is music to nicely fit under one tag, no style to apply to describe the myriad of sounds that appear in their albums. Make A Rising create not only a cross- genre approach, but also a great mixing of all of those into something that is rarely, if at all heard.

If asked what other bands come in mind when listening to them, again I find myself at odds; there are no immediate comparisons, but there are certain smaller pieces that I can find similarities to the likes of Time Of Orchis (vocals), Pochakaite Malko (use of folkish-elements and the building of an original and quirky style), Kayo Dot (the atmosphere on some of the songs), Cerebus Shoal (in the oddness and quirkiness of other songs) and even Sleepytime Gorilla Museum (some more theatrical side and also heavy riffing parts). There are other comparisons to be made, but the main point would be that all those references are for specific smaller parts in their music and when looking at it as a whole, they have a great sound of their own.

This being their second album, Make A Rising progresses on from their previous album both in production and in compositional style; the latter is built on what was done in the first album and going on from that point onwards. This album, much like the previous one is made up of songs which flow naturally one to the next, while each one has its own distinct identity. The style and rhythm varies between each song and also within the songs. Not only are those different styles mixing together wonderfully, but they’re done very well. The variety also comes into play in the instrumentation that includes apart from the usual rock repertoire, piano, accordion, saxflute, trumpet, cello, marimba, flute, clarinet and violin. This is well heard in the special theatrical and, for lack of a better word, ethnic sound. There are songs, like “Woodsong Pt. 1”, that have the classical instruments playing alone, adding another great facet to their sound repertoire. The continuation of this track in “Bradford’s Big Boatride” is even better as they electrify the previous part, achieving what is to me their best song here; here they create what is a fascinating and excellent mix of most of the sounds appearing on their album, vocals harmonies, great guitar riffing, classical instruments giving their emphasis, brilliant and catchy chorus, fantastic composition overall combining the best of all they do throughout the album. There is so much going on this a bit longer than 4 minute song that it’s such a joy to listen to. They could practically build a small concept on those 4 minutes alone.

What I particularly like is the contradiction they create with their heavy and complex parts and the quieter parts. It is less used here than their previous album. Their use of the classical instruments in both placements and making them suited to those is also very well done. Listen to how the violin is used in both settings. I also am in love with the complex and abrupt changes of rhythm and style, combining them effortlessly. This album also sees them showing their noise-making and improvisation skills (“How’s ‘bout A Love Supreme”), very well done, and I think they should expand on that as well in the future releases.

The band here shows how skilled they are, and how varied are their influences. They also show that they know how to take a previous achievement (their first release) and improve on it. I have great expectations from their next release based on this.

I feel I haven’t done justice to this wonderful album in my review. If at all I feel I’ve diminished their achievement with my mumblings. This is a fabulous album, one that is already on the top of my favourite albums for this year and is quickly becoming a personal favourite, regardless f year.

More than just 4 stars.

Report this review (#166066) | Posted Tuesday, April 08, 2008, 15:33 EST
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Edited by avestin - April 08 2008 at 18:34
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 21 2008 at 09:13
Anyone else get hold of this album?


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