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Topic ClosedFavourite cuisine...

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Poll Question: Which cuisine is your favourite?
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
5 [10.87%]
2 [4.35%]
5 [10.87%]
5 [10.87%]
6 [13.04%]
3 [6.52%]
6 [13.04%]
6 [13.04%]
2 [4.35%]
4 [8.70%]
2 [4.35%]
This topic is closed, no new votes accepted

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micky View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Favourite cuisine...
    Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:04
ummm... voting other...

Raffaella's cooking....
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:11
Originally posted by micky

ummm... voting other...

Raffaella's cooking....


HeartHeartHeart

Well, my cooking is a bit of a mixture between traditional Italian and other influences... I can't wait to be able to make a Thanksgiving dinner with a bit of an Italian twist!
Heart
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:12
Originally posted by BaldJean

Italian should definitely have been on the list; the Italian cuisine is generally believed to be one of the best in the world (among a few others that were named). Italian cuisine is a lot more than just pizza and spaghetti. do I really need to name famous culinary creations like Tournedos Rossini, Saltimbocca, Carpaggio, Osso Buco or Tira Mi Su, to name but a few?
Clap Absolutely - I dislike pasta with a passion and only tolerate pizza when I'm really hungry and cannot think of anything else to cook - but I still would rate Italian cooking as some of the best in the world - hmmm, Saltimbocca *drool* and Bresola, yumm!... or fish, simply cooked with just the right amount of seasoning, a dash of wine or lemon, a drizzle of olive oil and a touch of herbage - cannot be beaten. And Zabaglione - though I am very hesitant about ordering this in a restaurant - too often what is advertised on the menu is a pre-prepared flavoured egg-custard - it has to be made to order and is time-consuming to make, therefore best not done when the restraint is busy or you'll get a mess that separates out while you eat it Dead.
 
Then French Provençal style, or Spanish Basque cuisine... Approve
 
But for me, British cooking when done properly is the best - people may mock us as rostbeefs, but unless you've tried Rib of Beef roasted on the Bone so the inside is rare and tender while the outside is caramelised to perfection so the fats render into the meat, permeating the flavours throughout, you cannot knock it - better than all the other beef dishes I've tried (including fillet mignon and carpaccio)
 
...then there are the British puddings - Steamed, Charlotted, Crumbled, made into Pies, Milk Puddings, Rolly-Polly, Spotted Dick, Eve's Pudding... all served with real Birds Custard (The Pudding Club wouldn't use anything else - forget that pale and insipid watery stuff the French call Crème Anglais, it's got to be Bird's*)
 
As for the Asian foods - Thai every time - but only from a restaurant, supermarket pre-prepared and home-made just don't do it for me. (Though I do make a cracking chili beef soup using Red Thai curry paste and sweet'n'sour pickled mushrooms).
 
 
 
* Note: other brands of Custard powder may exist.


Edited by Dean - October 19 2008 at 10:14


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:12
Proper British meals for me, though Italian cuisine is delightful at times. Shame that this country's cookery seems to have gone downhill.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:14
Originally posted by Ghost Rider

Originally posted by micky

ummm... voting other...

Raffaella's cooking....


HeartHeartHeart

Well, my cooking is a bit of a mixture between traditional Italian and other influences... I can't wait to be able to make a Thanksgiving dinner with a bit of an Italian twist!
Heart



Turkey and pasta perhaps LOL
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:23
Originally posted by Dean

 
...then there are the British puddings - Steamed, Charlotted, Crumbled, made into Pies, Milk Puddings, Rolly-Polly, Spotted Dick, Eve's Pudding... all served with real Birds Custard (The Pudding Club wouldn't use anything else - forget that pale and insipid watery stuff the French call Crème Anglais, it's got to be Bird's*)
 
 
 
* Note: other brands of Custard powder may exist.


You might find it hard to believe, but a couple of years ago in Italy there was a book published called English Puddings (which is part of my ever-growing collection of cookbooks), featuring some of the most wonderful recipes for the aforementioned desserts. BTW, I'd rather make custard  from scratch - it's very easy if you use a thickening agent (such as flour or cornflour), and you can flavour it with a real vanilla bean.

As for the Thanksgiving dinner, I was rather thinking about a turkey roll filled with Italian sausage (there's no way I'm going to roast a whole turkey - we'd end up eating it for two monthsLOL!). Unlike Dean, I love pasta, but I agree that there is MUCH more to Italian cuisine than it - risotto being one of the many examples.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:28
Falafel is one of my favorite foods.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 10:31
Originally posted by Ghost Rider

Originally posted by Dean

 
...then there are the British puddings - Steamed, Charlotted, Crumbled, made into Pies, Milk Puddings, Rolly-Polly, Spotted Dick, Eve's Pudding... all served with real Birds Custard (The Pudding Club wouldn't use anything else - forget that pale and insipid watery stuff the French call Crème Anglais, it's got to be Bird's*)
 
 
 
* Note: other brands of Custard powder may exist.


You might find it hard to believe, but a couple of years ago in Italy there was a book published called English Puddings (which is part of my ever-growing collection of cookbooks), featuring some of the most wonderful recipes for the aforementioned desserts. BTW, I'd rather make custard  from scratch - it's very easy if you use a thickening agent (such as flour or cornflour), and you can flavour it with a real vanilla bean.

As for the Thanksgiving dinner, I was rather thinking about a turkey roll filled with Italian sausage (there's no way I'm going to roast a whole turkey - we'd end up eating it for two monthsLOL!). Unlike Dean, I love pasta, but I agree that there is MUCH more to Italian cuisine than it - risotto being one of the many examples.


*mouth waters*
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 11:25
did you know that a REAL sauce Bolognese needs to simmer for 24 hours? and what do people do today? buy some "Bolognese fix"at the local supermarket, stir it into boiling water and let it simmer for 5 minutes. it is certainly faster. however, you can be sure that at our restaurant we don't use any pre-prepared stuff from the supermarket. of course all the food already is prepared in advance, that's an absolute necessity; if a restaurant waited for the guests' orders before starting to cook they would have to wait several hours before getting served. but rest assured it is done at our restaurant and not at some factory

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 11:57

As much as I dislike pasta, I do like a good ragù alla bolognese made with white wine not red and not overly tomato flavoured (it should taste of meat, not tomatoes), and it has to be cooked slow and long (24 hours sounds excellent I'll have to try that sometime - I usually settle for 3-4 hours) and will tolerate it with a fresh egg-pasta such as tagliatelle (not spaggetti!!) but really love it with mash potato Shocked.

In the interests of Anglo-French detente - today we are making Bread and Butter pudding using brioche.Approve


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 12:08
Originally posted by Dean

As much as I dislike pasta, I do like a good ragù alla bolognese made with white wine not red and not overly tomato flavoured (it should taste of meat, not tomatoes), and it has to be cooked slow and long (24 hours sounds excellent I'll have to try that sometime - I usually settle for 3-4 hours) and will tolerate it with a fresh egg-pasta such as tagliatelle (not spaggetti!!) but really love it with mash potato Shocked.

In the interests of Anglo-French detente - today we are making Bread and Butter pudding using brioche.Approve


I think you are aware that 'spaghetti bolognese' is NOT an authentic Italian dish by any means. In its region of origin, it is ALWAYS served over egg noodles (tagliatelle or fettuccine, depending on where you are from), and NEVER on spaghetti or other dried pasta. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 12:15
Originally posted by Ghost Rider

I think you are aware that 'spaghetti bolognese' is NOT an authentic Italian dish by any means. In its region of origin, it is ALWAYS served over egg noodles (tagliatelle or fettuccine, depending on where you are from), and NEVER on spaghetti or other dried pasta. 
Embarrassed you know me too well...
 
I've also been told that Italians rarely use garlic and onions in the same dish, is this true?
 


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 12:23
As far as I am concerned, I often use both (I did this morning when making braised green beans, and they were delicious). However, when I make bolognese, I only use onion (white), minced in a blender together with celery and carrot. There are dishes in which only one of the two should be used - risotto, unless it's made with seafood, is usually only made with onion.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 18:57
Mexican Big smile


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 20:03
PERUVIAN!

Extremely varied food: fish, fish, fish and fish. oh! and fish!
Seriously, it's just delicious all the restaurants. Pittily my stomach wasn't prepared for all-day fish, and I got diarrea

Peru=Excellencie on Fish!
I miss Peru's food and sea
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 19 2008 at 20:45
Originally posted by cacho

PERUVIAN!

Extremely varied food: fish, fish, fish and fish. oh! and fish!
Seriously, it's just delicious all the restaurants. Pittily my stomach wasn't prepared for all-day fish, and I got diarrea

Peru=Excellencie on Fish!
I miss Peru's food and sea


oh hell yeah...  a friend of mine took to a great Peruvian place here... and introduced me to some dish.. the hell if I remember what it was.... but told me it was the culinary evilavent of popping a few viagra.

well..  if having your tongue sufffer a raging hard-on is what he meant.. he was dead on. 


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 20 2008 at 03:54
As to the Indian cuisine: When you go into an Indian restaurant in Germany you can choose to have your food prepared in one of three ways: Mild, normal or hot. However, even going for the "mild" option will make the average European palate feel as if the gates of hell just opened. LOL

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 20 2008 at 04:11
Indian food can kick serious butt.

I honestly just mainly eat your average "Western/Americanized" food, but man, some good Indian food can really rock my boat.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 20 2008 at 11:27
Originally posted by HughesJB4

Indian food can kick serious butt.

I honestly just mainly eat your average "Western/Americanized" food, but man, some good Indian food can really rock my boat.


You have good taste

I take it you love a good curry like me then? Any preference?
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 20 2008 at 14:00
Originally posted by BaldFriede

As to the Indian cuisine: When you go into an Indian restaurant in Germany you can choose to have your food prepared in one of three ways: Mild, normal or hot. However, even going for the "mild" option will make the average European palate feel as if the gates of hell just opened. LOL


Funny story.  On our first dinner date I took my future wife to a local Indian restaurant called Himalayas.  We were aware of our mutual love for hot food.  She ordered the lamb vindaloo and for some reason they decided to make it mild.  I didn't believe her at first that it wasn't hot like it normally is, thinking she must have some kind of iron palate, until I tried some.  As it turns out she does have a higher tolerance for heat than I do. 
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