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Robert Fripp - Please make him amazing for me

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Valdez View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Valdez Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Robert Fripp - Please make him amazing for me
    Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:52
I would say that the most interesting guitar work that RF has ever done resides in the song "Starless" on RED.  Starting at 4:29...
 
And i am not kidding either... it's the most effective (albeit economical) guitar solo I have ever heard.   
 


Edited by Valdez - June 10 2009 at 21:54
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Post Options Post Options   Quote WalterDigsTunes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:53
Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

If you want other Fripp stuff, here are a few songs he did as a session guitarist where he really tears it up.

Brian Eno- St. Elmo's Fire
Brian Eno- Babies on Fire
Peter Gabriel- Excuse Me
Talking Heads- I Zimbra
David Bowie- Teenage Wildlife
David Bowie- Scary Monsters


If these don't do it for you, I don't know what will.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Slartibartfast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:55
Now, you are getting verrry sleepy and when you awake, you will find Fripp not only amazing, but AMAZINGLY AMAZING!!!!

Edited by Slartibartfast - June 12 2009 at 19:21
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Post Options Post Options   Quote rushfan4 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2009 at 22:12
Probably the reason for The ConstruKction of Light having both FraKctured and Larks Tongue in Aspic IV.  There is actually some decent guitar playing on this album, but it is not a very enjoyable album to listen to in my opinion.  You can definitely pick up on some of the repeated themes within these songs.

Edited by rushfan4 - June 10 2009 at 22:12
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jammun Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 10 2009 at 22:25
Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 
Can you tell me where we're headin'?
Lincoln County Road or Armageddon.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote harmonium.ro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2009 at 07:15
I absolutely love Fripp's playing, even though I can't name any spectacular moments (maybe except some in "Red" the album). I'm just starting to explore his solo discography. "The Repercussions of Angelic Behaviour" shows some impressive playing, but it's not easy-listening at all... It might not suit your taste.



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Post Options Post Options   Quote BaldFriede Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2009 at 07:33
Originally posted by jammun

Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 

I totally agree with the acoustic guitar in "Circus". If you don''t go "wow" over that one you have no idea of guitar playing.
Also have a look at this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4V9pQsOc30
If this still does not convince you, you can't be helped.



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Post Options Post Options   Quote Raff Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2009 at 07:35
I'll go against the grain here, and tell you that it is not mandatory to find Fripp (or anyone else) amazing. From what you know about your tastes, Scott, you are into a more 'traditional' guitar style, as in classic rock (something that I share with you, so it is not surprising that Fripp's style may leave you somewhat cold.

Personally speaking, I appreciate him more as an all-round musician (composer, innovator, etc.) than as a mere guitarist. He may be the only constant in the endless variations of the KC lineup, but the band sure would have never been the icon of progressive rock they are without the contribution of the other musicians - Lake, Wetton, McDonald, Bruford, and all the rest.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote BaldFriede Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2009 at 08:38
Originally posted by Raff

I'll go against the grain here, and tell you that it is not mandatory to find Fripp (or anyone else) amazing. From what you know about your tastes, Scott, you are into a more 'traditional' guitar style, as in classic rock (something that I share with you, so it is not surprising that Fripp's style may leave you somewhat cold.

Personally speaking, I appreciate him more as an all-round musician (composer, innovator, etc.) than as a mere guitarist. He may be the only constant in the endless variations of the KC lineup, but the band sure would have never been the icon of progressive rock they are without the contribution of the other musicians - Lake, Wetton, McDonald, Bruford, and all the rest.

I believe it is quite possible to recognize instrumental mastership without having to like what is being played; I see absolutely no contradiction there.
Example: I dislike double bass drumming and would NEVER resort to it myself (I am a drummer); nevertheless I won't deny the skills of drummers that use it.


Edited by BaldFriede - June 11 2009 at 08:40

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Post Options Post Options   Quote tamijo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2009 at 09:00
Its infact hard to think of him as trying to do the more Basic stuff, or rather where does he move down to the level of a Rock lead guitar player,
His talent is not trying to compete with steve Vai, thanks god for that.
But try Heroes, by bowie, the hole record is full of playfull fripp Leadguitar.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Vibrationbaby Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2009 at 09:24
I like Bob`s mirthful Saxon wit. 
                
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Post Options Post Options   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 11 2009 at 12:53
Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

If you want other Fripp stuff, here are a few songs he did as a session guitarist where he really tears it up.

Brian Eno- Babies on Fire
 
Just get the album "Here Come the warm Jets" ... Robert is all over that album and folks like eno trust him enough to let him do his thing and there are some fine things in there ... and the best one is the bombastic one ... fabulous.
 
I also like his involvement in a couple of other places. In Peter Hammill's album H to He, he also does some really nice things ...
 
A lot of people prefer KC for many reasons, but sadly the discussions of his music and processes are rarely taken on, and some folks would rather consider this "prog" than actually look at what he does ... and he does it well -- and it has a lot to do with something else ... that is "progressive" and widely used in many arts ... but rarely seen in music, specially when too much of it is centered around a concept (like "jazz", "rock" and other styles) that precludes anyone's ability to be creative, original and special in their own way.
 
The sad result of treating it this way is that it brings down the value of the music in the context of the musical history itself, and the appreciation for Robert Fripp's magnanimous work in helping develop the guitar playing into something much more tangible than ... a rock guitar playing rock'n'roll ... and not even the "prog" boards and reviewers credit him on that account.
 
Taking an instrument and "expanding" it, is what Robert is about ... the musical context is less important per se ... and this is widely seen in so many King Crimson albums ... there is an incredible difference between a lot of things in there and styles and experiments over the years. And this is the legacy that the band is not receiving when it is being cornered into being a "prog" band, which even Robert Fripp does not accept and denies.
 
In theater, there are some exercises that are used in acting to help season the actor some ... and improve the quality of the eventual performance. And some of these things could be simple, weird, and crazy, but in the end, it adds to the result some surprising details. Let's say that a scene is stuck and sounds boring. And you are trying to figure out how to make it better. Saying the words differently is not helping. Having you face the wall is not helping. Having the stage colored in blue is not helping ... what do you do?
 
In acting terms, you do not throw the wrench in, but you throw a left curve in the middle of things ... and this often has unexpected results and the acting training is important ... for it to work ... so all of a sudden you have a pause ... and when you re-enter the scene/play/music, it sounds ... slightly different ... because you changed it's procedure. If you apply this to King Crimson, it becomes clear that there are moments when something similar to this happens ... and instead of a chord change you have a song change ... a completely different something that brings a different personna to the table.
 
Now apply this to the 1st album by King Crimson ... and you find that ... there are a couple of open ended pieces (Moonchild for example) ... and then it breaks into a massive anthem ... Epitath ... taken from a poem written by a friend, and a vociferous attack on the warmongering mentality around the world, from Ireland -- not too far away from London and the shameless bombings with or without reason, to VietNam the TV war, to the Cold War also a few miles out from London ... in a town where the arts are its biggest attraction ... no one goes to London for anything else (well ... victorian england writers might say it differently!) ... and a lot of these people sit and drink together ... and ohhh by the way ... his wife was an actress and singer -- like he wouldn't know some of this stuff?
 
It should be said, that King Crimson helped validate the rock music medium a lot more with its expressive and poetic tuning, than anything else ... since at the time, a lot of rock music was still tied to popular music and radio specially ... and its ability to show itself as more intelligent, more classical and more in tune with a higher knowledgable sense and part of ourselves, was its greatest gift to you and I.
 
And a tribute to a giant in that area ... not the only one, mind you ... but a Giant ... and he knows it ... but he is also intelligent enough to know that the media world of stars is fickle (witness fans here demanding that their favorite bands kiss their behinds and not do what they see fit for their art!) and often times brutal, and more often than not folks like Robert Fripp can not deal with that well, and will closet himself and stay focused on the music, instead of what could come across as anger on his part ...
 
You can also tell that he is more "classically minded" with his instrument, when he is playing it sitting down, and trying to get more out of the instrument than otherwise many of us are capable of imagining ... and I think this is important ... some people think that this takes the emotional side of rock music out ... and that is a sin, since we can not imagine that music without it ... but what we are not seeing is ... here is a modern day Paganini ... and I'm not sure that you could EVER ask for more.
 
If you read this far ... I applaud you ... and commend you for being so kind ... the music itself and the artists are much greater than any words I could possibly ever come up with ...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 08:34
Originally posted by Valdez

I would say that the most interesting guitar work that RF has ever done resides in the song "Starless" on RED.  Starting at 4:29...
 
And i am not kidding either... it's the most effective (albeit economical) guitar solo I have ever heard.   
 


This is my favourite too, and not just at 4.29, as subtle and great as that passage is, it's also the tasteful introduction as well. The title track, Red, is also a colossus of prog.

He is such a clever and eclectric musician that it is somewhat difficult to pick out blinding solos, as King Crimson, in whatever lineup, were always about the whole, and not the individual. Depending on my mood, I enjoy Belew as much as Wetton, Lake, Anderson et al.


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Post Options Post Options   Quote Evolver Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 09:20
Originally posted by jammun

Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 
I must agree with this, as well.  LTIA part one, after the second wave of power chords, Fripp's playing always amazes me here.
 
Cirkus, also.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Jim Garten Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 09:56
I've always seen KC as Fripp's way of getting stunning collections of diverse musicians together in one place; I mean look at the people who've moved through KC over the last 40 years - it reads like a prog rock who's who (I guess the American equivalent would have been the Frank Zappa Finishing School ).

So many albums have been listed here from KC & outside interests, but another I'd like to stick in the mix would be his work with David Sylvian - these two in particular:



Gone To Earth (Fripp and Bill Nelson on the same album )



The First Day

Grumpy old bugger he may be, but Fripp has never stood still - in this respect, he could possibly be cited as one of the ultimate & true progressive rock guitarists.

Just my opinion, you understand.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote A B Negative Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 10:45
Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

If you want other Fripp stuff, here are a few songs he did as a session guitarist where he really tears it up.

Brian Eno- St. Elmo's Fire
Brian Eno- Babies on Fire
Peter Gabriel- Excuse Me
Talking Heads- I Zimbra
David Bowie- Teenage Wildlife
David Bowie- Scary Monsters
 
I'd add Blondie - Fade Away and Radiate.
 
"The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar.... Now, that's my idea of a good time."
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Post Options Post Options   Quote harmonium.ro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 18:52
Fripp has played on a Blondie album? Shocked
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Slartibartfast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 19:21
Originally posted by harmonium.ro

Fripp has played on a Blondie album? Shocked

I had heard that and then read somewhere he was only considering working with them, but I see two songs named, so I'll buy it.

As I mentioned earlier, he has also played on a Darryl Hall album. ShockedLOL


Edited by Slartibartfast - June 12 2009 at 22:36
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Post Options Post Options   Quote prog4evr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 20:07
From the same album as "Neal and Jack and Me," the last song "Requiem" on KC 'Beat' (1982) is some of the best Fripp guitar work I have ever heard.  Belew complements well also on that song, as does Bruford's exceptional jazzy drumming...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Slartibartfast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 12 2009 at 22:46
How about some Fripp with the Roches?
Prog Folk perhaps?
  1. we
  2. hammond song
  3. mr. sellack
  4. damned old dog
  5. the troubles
  6. the train
  7. the married men
  8. runs in the family
  9. quitting time
  10. pretty and high


Liner Notes:

WE
Words & Music by Maggie, Terre & Suzzy Roche

HAMMOND SONG
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

MR. SELLACK
Words & Music by Terre Roche

DAMNED OLD DOG
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

THE TROUBLES
Words & Music by Maggie, Terre & Suzzy Roche

THE TRAIN
Words & Music by Suzzy Roche

THE MARRIED MEN
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

RUNS IN THE FAMILY
Words & Music by Terre Roche

QUITING TIME
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

PRETTY AND HIGH
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche



PRODUCED IN AUDIO VERITE BY ROBERT FRIPP
Engineer: Ed Sprigg
Assitant Engineer: Jon Smith
Recorded at the Hit Factory in New York during September, October & November 1978

MUSICIANS:
Suzzy Roche - Vocals, Guitar
Maggie Roche - Vocals, Guitar, Synthesizer (on "Quitting Time")
Terre Roche - Vocals, Guitar
Robert Fripp - Electric Guitar, Fripperies
Tony Levin - Bass
Jim Maelen - Triangle, Shaker
Larry Fast - Synthesizer Programmer
Special thanks to everyone who came to the shows
Art Direction: Peter Whorf
Design Brad Kanawyer
Photography: Gary Heery

NOTES

With one of the most distinctive and diverse vocal sounds in the modern musical spectrum, the Roche sisters -- Maggie, Suzzy and Terre -- weave barbershop harmonies, traditional Irish melodies, doo-wop, bee bop and a dozen other styles into a sound wholly their own on their acclaimed 1979 release, The Roches. Featuring ten original songs written by the trio singly or in various combinations, The Roches spotlights the wry humor, subtle arrangements and consummate musical craftsmanship that has brought the group both critical and popular acclaim.

Maggie and Terre Roche first began singing together professionally in the late '60s, when both left school to pursue a musical career. In 1970, they were recruited by Paul Simon to sing backup on his best-selling LP There Goes Rhymin' Simon. Shortly thereafter, the duo released their own LP, Seductive Reasoning (1975). After relocating briefly to Louisiana, the pair appeared as a duo for the last time at the Women's Music Festival in the summer of 1976.

Suzzy Roche, who had been attending college in upstate New York, joined her sisters that same year. Now a trio, The Roches immediately earned a loyal following on the Greenwhich Village club scene, where their wide ranging musical tastes and penchant for lyric wordplay garnered critical raves. Signed to Warner Bros. Records in late 1978, they began work immediately on their debut album with renowned producer and conceptualist Robert Fripp.

The result is The Roches, produced in "Audio Verite" and featuring such standout cuts as the introductory "We," "The Married Men" (subsequently covered by Phoebe Snow), the moody "Hammond Song" and "Pretty And High."



He's amazingly amazing in his being all over the place. Big smile

It's really weird.  Every place I run into Fripp in the prog music web I've run into something musically that I haven't experienced before...


Edited by Slartibartfast - June 12 2009 at 22:54
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