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el bŲthy View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 21 2010 at 15:04
Thomas Johnson! Number one in my book
"You want me to play what, Robert?"
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 24 2010 at 23:08
Rick Wright
Jon Lord
Don Airey
Paul Raymond
Geoff Downes
Rick Wakeman
Jim Gilmour
Dennis DeYoung
Ken Hensley
Michael Sadler
 
Jazz isn't dead.......it just smells funny.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 25 2010 at 01:14
Here is my list (just prog or prog-related):

1) Keith Emerson / Rick Wakeman
2) Tony Banks
3) Chick Corea
4) Patrick Moraz
5) Herbie Hacock
6) Rick Wright
7) Jon Lord
8) Peter Bardens
9) Eddie Jobson
10) Thijs Van Leer / Don Airey

...but I also have to mention:

Hugh Banton
Kerry Minnear
Jordan Rudess
Par Lindh
Ray Manzarek
Rick van der Linden
Steve Winwood
Joe Zawinul
Jan Hammer
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 27 2010 at 01:51
In no particular order:
 
Keith Emerson
Rick Wakeman
David Greenslade
Jon Lord
Ken Hemsley (forgive spelling (Uriah Heep)
Lyle Mays
Tony Kaye
Chick Korea
Jo Zawinul
Dave Stewart (I think that's his name - used to be with Egg)
 
Perhaps a couple of jazz fusion guys included in the above
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 27 2010 at 02:08
No love for the late Alan Gowen at all? No-one mentioned him.


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 27 2010 at 10:36
Originally posted by Ivan_Melgar_M Ivan_Melgar_M wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

 
Interesting comment about his 'Hollywood name'.So what do you consider his ''new age'' albums?
I would suggest:
Apocalypse Des Animaux
La Fete Sauvage
Opera Sauvage
Antarctica
Soil Festivites
perhaps also
Oceanic
Voices
None of those albums are bad imo but each to his own
 
For me the worst albums are mostly the film soundtrack stuff like Chariots Of Fire ,Conquest Of Paradise and Alexander all very dull imo. The exception is Blade Runner obviouslyBig smile
 
It's quite funny, after getting Heaven & Hell in the late 80's, I was so impressed that called my parents (who were in USA), and asked for everything Vangelis had released.
 
They got me like 10 or 12 albums, and the only ones I found interesting were:
  1. Heaven & Hell
  2. Albedo 0,39
  3. Spiral
  4. China (even when a bit tedious)
  5. Blade Runner (Bought later)

Most of the post Albedo are New Age in some degree (some more, some less) according to my opinion and The Friends of Mr Cairo is just cheesy.

Even when not all his albums are New Age, the name Vangelis is an icon of the New Age Holllywood soundtracks, for all of us who were there.
 
But I really was impressed with his technique in MYTHODEA  DVD, his performance is simply btilliant, one of the best I have ever seen, remember having watched this with my mother (who is a concertist and was never impressed with the technique of most Prog keyboardists) one day I visited her  and she was simply amazed.
 
IvŠn
I have that DVD as well.Very nice stuff.
 
Amongst his soundtracks I forgot to mention The Bounty which actually has some decent moments as evidenced on the The Themes compilation.Never been able to track down a CD of the complete soundtrack though.There's also some music he did for a Roman Polanski film but I've never actually heard it.
 
Worth a mention in passing is the 1972 Aphrodites Child album '666' which to me is good stuff but I know from reading your review that you're not such a big fan of it.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 29 2010 at 21:24
Neal Morse
Peter Bardens
Erdesz Robert
Kit Watkins
Edgar Froese

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 00:31
Originally posted by cloviskoba cloviskoba wrote:

Neal Morse


good call!
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 00:44
Mike Ratledge
David Sinclair
Alan Gowen (there you go Friede Tongue)
Emmanuel Borghi
Robert Wyatt
Edgar Froese
Kerry Minnear
George Duke
Dave Stewart
Florian Fricke

Those are in no specific order.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 00:48
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

 
Worth a mention in passing is the 1972 Aphrodites Child album '666' which to me is good stuff but I know from reading your review that you're not such a big fan of it.
 
Are you sure you read my review? Wink
 
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5 stars Progressive Rock fans usually are unfair with talented musicians as Demis Roussos and Evangelos Odysseus Papathanassiou (Vangelis), is true that Demis solo career is mostly based in soft pop but people forget he was a very talented bassist with a great vocal range and Vangelis is remembered for his New Age boring albums or commercial soundtracks instead of progressive masterpieces as "Heaven & Hell" or even his albums with Jon Anderson, which are not among my favorites but must recognize as quality music.

It's also a important to remember APHRODITE'S CHILD was not only formed by the mentioned musicians because Anargyros (Silver) Koulouris who had returned from his military Service to record this album is a very good guitar player and Lucas Sideras is a very capable drummer, this two members had a direct participation in the album

Because of the complexity of 666 they recruited also a good number of Greek artists to complement the band as the multi talented and brilliant actress Irene Papas, Harris Chalkitis and Michel Ripoche for the winds, a great lyricist, movie director, book author and member of the European Film Academy Costas Ferris to take care of the lyrics and even the well known artist Yannis Tsarouchis for the Greek text. In other words, the album was carefully planned.

The concept of the album is about the most complex and controversial Book of the Bible, "Saint John's Book of Revelations" also known as "The Apocalypse", a really hard task even today, but harder in 1970 when there was very little experience with conceptual albums, it's important to notice that 666 is considered the first properly concept album, because before it were only released some rock operas which are part of a different sub-genre.

When 666 was recorded the problems inside the band were leading to the inevitable split, mostly because Roussos and Sideras wanted to continue doing commercial music as in their previous albums and Vangelis was decided to take a more complex path, so 666 was really their last attempt to maintain the classic formation of the band allowing Vangelis to compose a real progressive and complex album, but it was too late for the band, and 666 was their last album, an excellent way to close the short story of APHRODITE'S CHILD.

It's hard to describe the music because there's not other band that had a similar sound or style, the Greek influence is also different than the usual, don't expect something catchy or folksy as Zorba the Greek, because the band uses darker religious music over a 100% Symphonic structure with touches of Psychedelia, it's important to remember that Greece is the country where the Orthodox Catholic Church is based, and this influence helps to create a Biblical and mysterious atmosphere.

The greatest achievement of the band is the way they blend this liturgical music with more western influences like pop and of course symphonic prog. But they do something even more adventurous, they include some tracks that sound like prayers by monks, with traces of Gregorian Chants and even complex sounds, they were ahead of their time in many aspects.

It's hard to describe the tracks searching for a favorite or high point, because the album is very faithful to "The Book of Revelations" and any attempt of separating a song takes it from it's natural context and breaks the atmosphere so carefully created by APHRODITE'S CHILD.

For example the track Infinity (sign that can't be reproduced with a PC keyboard) outside of the album means nothing except a woman having an orgasm, but in the context of the album makes sense because the Book of Revelation makes various references to the prostitute that tempted the kings. It may be a good interpretation by Irene Papas but don't place out loud in the CD player of your car unless you have the windows closed because it may be embarrassing.

Disk 1 has many important songs after the weird "The System" which sounds as a strange prayer.

"Babylon" is a rock song with an outstanding guitar work, even though is a studio track, the band created the sound of a crowd to symbolize multitudes on the biblical capital of the world, very good song even if not progressive.

"Loud, Loud, Loud" is a narration of a paragraph of the Bible surrounded by a beautiful piano, for this song the band used the voice of the son of a Greek Diplomat, very atmospheric track.

"The Four Horsemen" is a terrifying song that starts with a scary narration in the form of a sung prayer, talks about the moment The Lamb (Christ) opens the seals to free the four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, followed by the band leaded by Lucas Sideras and his accurate drums, really scares me very much.

"The Lamb" is an instrumental with a very Greek sound; the entire band is perfect and well supported by a chorus that adds some dramatics. Almost in the same vein but softer and darker comes "The Seventh Seal" which announces more terrible moments for humanity, the phrase "And when the Lamb opened the Seventh Seal, Silence above the Skies" resumes the terrible message.

"Aegian Seal" has an introduction that you could expect from any Vangelis later album but followed by explosions of music and narrations.

The rest of the first CD is full of laments, tribulations and Greek style music blended perfectly with progressive rock, maybe except for "The Beast" which I supposed would be the darker song but paradoxically is the only poppy track of the album with a guitar that reminds of Clapton's slow hand.

Disk 2 is even better than the first one (if this is possible) "Seven Trumpets" is a 30 seconds track that literally announces the next song "Altamont" which is very atmospheric and elaborate and shows the great skills of Vangelis as keyboardist, who without the wonderful excesses of Wakeman or Emerson does a very precise work, the background voice is very disturbing and scary, as anyone could expect from an album that describes the end of the world.

"The Wedding of the Lamb" is a strange song that mixes Gregorian Chants with Greek Liturgical music, supported by percussion, other typical Greek instruments and the whole band, confusing but very good track. The next song "The Capture of the Beast" is a track based in percussion and chain sounds with some typical Vangelis keyboard interruptions.

Talked already about "Infinity" so I won't do it again. "Hic et Nunc" (Here and Now) is a jazzy tune that works as a relief in preparation for the most important song of the album which is "All the Seats Were Occupied", a 19:19 minutes epic that mixes all the influences, sounds and songs of the album in a single track all surrounded by a mystical atmosphere, extremely beautiful and very complex represents Progressive Rock best face.

The album ends with the only ballad named Break, which sounds to me as a Roussos contribution, not a filler, but not necessary either, because IMHO 666 would have ended perfectly with the wonderful "All the Seats Were Occupied"

After 666 was recorded in 1970, the band broke and the album couldn't be released until 1972 because of many reasons that include the track "Infinity", the controversial concept and an innocent confession made by the band that they were influenced by Sahlep, most people believed it was a demon or a drug when it's only a non alcoholic beverage from Turkey. There was even a boycott by several radio stations, and when the album was finally released by Vertigo (the adventurous face of Mercury), the band was separate for two years.

There's no other possible rate for this essential masterpiece than 5 stars, not only for it's quality but also because this guys were ahead of their own time, something unusual for a band that had previously released only two poppy albums in search for a hit single.

Send comments to Ivan_Melgar_M (BETA) | Report this review (#31536)
Posted 6:57:57 PM EST, 6/27/2004
 
As a fact is one of my top 10 all time albums and reviewed it with a 5 stars rating in 2004, a few days after I joined the forum.
 
But this is not a Vangelis album, it's the Aphrodite's Child masterpiece.
 
IvŠn


Edited by Ivan_Melgar_M - April 30 2010 at 00:53
            
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 01:24
I am surprised you forgot to mention that "I am, I was, I am to come" is an excerpt from a verse in Revelation (Rev 1:8). it depends on the translation though to find it in that form; the King James bible, for example, gives Rev 1:8 as "I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is to come, the Almighty". Irene Papas took some liberties with the meaning of "I am to come" though


Edited by BaldJean - April 30 2010 at 01:26


A shot of me as High Priestess of Gaia during our fall festival. Ceterum censeo pricipiis obsta
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 01:32
Originally posted by BaldJean BaldJean wrote:

I am surprised you forgot to mention that "I am, I was, I am to come" is an excerpt from a verse in Revelation (Rev 1:8). it depends on the translation though to find it in that form; the King James bible, for example, gives Rev 1:8 as "I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is to come, the Almighty". Irene Papas took some liberties with the meaning of "I am to come" though
 

Yes, but I was raised with the Catholic Bible in Spanish, which says:

8"Yo soy el Alfa y la Omega", dice el SeŮor Dios, "el que es, y que era y que ha de venir, el Todopoderoso.

8"I am the Alpha and the Omega," says the Lord God, "who is, and who was, and who is to come, the Almighty."

And to be honest, my capacity to translate in my mind complex Bible passages from Spanish to English when I heard this album, was even worst than it is today . Confused

Since I use the Internet on daily bases (mainly because of this site), I'm more or less able to think in English when writing in this language, but in 2004 I wasn't yet, I had to do all the process of thinking in Spanish and then translating it all, and for his reason lost a lot of details. Ouch

IvŠn
 
 


Edited by Ivan_Melgar_M - April 30 2010 at 01:43
            
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 01:37
Originally posted by Ivan_Melgar_M Ivan_Melgar_M wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

 
Worth a mention in passing is the 1972 Aphrodites Child album '666' which to me is good stuff but I know from reading your review that you're not such a big fan of it.
 
Are you sure you read my review? Wink
 
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5 stars Progressive Rock fans usually are unfair with talented musicians as Demis Roussos and Evangelos Odysseus Papathanassiou (Vangelis), is true that Demis solo career is mostly based in soft pop but people forget he was a very talented bassist with a great vocal range and Vangelis is remembered for his New Age boring albums or commercial soundtracks instead of progressive masterpieces as "Heaven & Hell" or even his albums with Jon Anderson, which are not among my favorites but must recognize as quality music.

It's also a important to remember APHRODITE'S CHILD was not only formed by the mentioned musicians because Anargyros (Silver) Koulouris who had returned from his military Service to record this album is a very good guitar player and Lucas Sideras is a very capable drummer, this two members had a direct participation in the album

Because of the complexity of 666 they recruited also a good number of Greek artists to complement the band as the multi talented and brilliant actress Irene Papas, Harris Chalkitis and Michel Ripoche for the winds, a great lyricist, movie director, book author and member of the European Film Academy Costas Ferris to take care of the lyrics and even the well known artist Yannis Tsarouchis for the Greek text. In other words, the album was carefully planned.

The concept of the album is about the most complex and controversial Book of the Bible, "Saint John's Book of Revelations" also known as "The Apocalypse", a really hard task even today, but harder in 1970 when there was very little experience with conceptual albums, it's important to notice that 666 is considered the first properly concept album, because before it were only released some rock operas which are part of a different sub-genre.

When 666 was recorded the problems inside the band were leading to the inevitable split, mostly because Roussos and Sideras wanted to continue doing commercial music as in their previous albums and Vangelis was decided to take a more complex path, so 666 was really their last attempt to maintain the classic formation of the band allowing Vangelis to compose a real progressive and complex album, but it was too late for the band, and 666 was their last album, an excellent way to close the short story of APHRODITE'S CHILD.

It's hard to describe the music because there's not other band that had a similar sound or style, the Greek influence is also different than the usual, don't expect something catchy or folksy as Zorba the Greek, because the band uses darker religious music over a 100% Symphonic structure with touches of Psychedelia, it's important to remember that Greece is the country where the Orthodox Catholic Church is based, and this influence helps to create a Biblical and mysterious atmosphere.

The greatest achievement of the band is the way they blend this liturgical music with more western influences like pop and of course symphonic prog. But they do something even more adventurous, they include some tracks that sound like prayers by monks, with traces of Gregorian Chants and even complex sounds, they were ahead of their time in many aspects.

It's hard to describe the tracks searching for a favorite or high point, because the album is very faithful to "The Book of Revelations" and any attempt of separating a song takes it from it's natural context and breaks the atmosphere so carefully created by APHRODITE'S CHILD.

For example the track Infinity (sign that can't be reproduced with a PC keyboard) outside of the album means nothing except a woman having an orgasm, but in the context of the album makes sense because the Book of Revelation makes various references to the prostitute that tempted the kings. It may be a good interpretation by Irene Papas but don't place out loud in the CD player of your car unless you have the windows closed because it may be embarrassing.

Disk 1 has many important songs after the weird "The System" which sounds as a strange prayer.

"Babylon" is a rock song with an outstanding guitar work, even though is a studio track, the band created the sound of a crowd to symbolize multitudes on the biblical capital of the world, very good song even if not progressive.

"Loud, Loud, Loud" is a narration of a paragraph of the Bible surrounded by a beautiful piano, for this song the band used the voice of the son of a Greek Diplomat, very atmospheric track.

"The Four Horsemen" is a terrifying song that starts with a scary narration in the form of a sung prayer, talks about the moment The Lamb (Christ) opens the seals to free the four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, followed by the band leaded by Lucas Sideras and his accurate drums, really scares me very much.

"The Lamb" is an instrumental with a very Greek sound; the entire band is perfect and well supported by a chorus that adds some dramatics. Almost in the same vein but softer and darker comes "The Seventh Seal" which announces more terrible moments for humanity, the phrase "And when the Lamb opened the Seventh Seal, Silence above the Skies" resumes the terrible message.

"Aegian Seal" has an introduction that you could expect from any Vangelis later album but followed by explosions of music and narrations.

The rest of the first CD is full of laments, tribulations and Greek style music blended perfectly with progressive rock, maybe except for "The Beast" which I supposed would be the darker song but paradoxically is the only poppy track of the album with a guitar that reminds of Clapton's slow hand.

Disk 2 is even better than the first one (if this is possible) "Seven Trumpets" is a 30 seconds track that literally announces the next song "Altamont" which is very atmospheric and elaborate and shows the great skills of Vangelis as keyboardist, who without the wonderful excesses of Wakeman or Emerson does a very precise work, the background voice is very disturbing and scary, as anyone could expect from an album that describes the end of the world.

"The Wedding of the Lamb" is a strange song that mixes Gregorian Chants with Greek Liturgical music, supported by percussion, other typical Greek instruments and the whole band, confusing but very good track. The next song "The Capture of the Beast" is a track based in percussion and chain sounds with some typical Vangelis keyboard interruptions.

Talked already about "Infinity" so I won't do it again. "Hic et Nunc" (Here and Now) is a jazzy tune that works as a relief in preparation for the most important song of the album which is "All the Seats Were Occupied", a 19:19 minutes epic that mixes all the influences, sounds and songs of the album in a single track all surrounded by a mystical atmosphere, extremely beautiful and very complex represents Progressive Rock best face.

The album ends with the only ballad named Break, which sounds to me as a Roussos contribution, not a filler, but not necessary either, because IMHO 666 would have ended perfectly with the wonderful "All the Seats Were Occupied"

After 666 was recorded in 1970, the band broke and the album couldn't be released until 1972 because of many reasons that include the track "Infinity", the controversial concept and an innocent confession made by the band that they were influenced by Sahlep, most people believed it was a demon or a drug when it's only a non alcoholic beverage from Turkey. There was even a boycott by several radio stations, and when the album was finally released by Vertigo (the adventurous face of Mercury), the band was separate for two years.

There's no other possible rate for this essential masterpiece than 5 stars, not only for it's quality but also because this guys were ahead of their own time, something unusual for a band that had previously released only two poppy albums in search for a hit single.

Send comments to Ivan_Melgar_M (BETA) | Report this review (#31536)
Posted 6:57:57 PM EST, 6/27/2004
 
As a fact is one of my top 10 all time albums and reviewed it with a 5 stars rating in 2004, a few days after I joined the forum.
 
But this is not a Vangelis album, it's the Aphrodite's Child masterpiece.
 
IvŠn
Sorry complete misunderstanding on my part. I was sure I read some comment (which I wrongly attributed to you) that the album was a big disappointment to them after the 'hype' of several positive reviews.
 
Great review and I also regard this as a masterpeice. The only thing I would pick you up on is the song 'infinity' which got dubbed by many as 'The Orgasm Song'. I remember an interview with Irene Papas some years ago that where she claimed that the song was actually about exorcism. However after my previous mistake I guess I might be wrong about this as wellSmile
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 01:48
Well Richardh, most surely you are right, Irene was an outstanding actress, but probably her motivation of the song was different than the one the artists had..
 
IvŠn
 
            
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2010 at 08:03
1. Emerson
2.Wakeman
 
those two were the maestros.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 09 2010 at 05:04
rick wright
keith emerson
jordan rudess

together we stand divided we fall
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 09 2010 at 14:37
Don't know many but...

  1. Martin Orford
  2. Richard Wright
  3. Kevin Moore
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 12 2010 at 02:49
1. MariŠn Varga
2. Keith Emerson
3. Jozef Skrzek
4. Rick Wakeman
5. Ken Hensley
6. Jon Lord
7. Dave Greenslade
8. Jan Hammer
9. Allan "Taff" Freeman
10. Peter Bardens
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 12 2010 at 04:37
Originally posted by Ivan_Melgar_M Ivan_Melgar_M wrote:

    Yikes, I forgot such keyboardists as:

    1. Jon Lord
    2. Ken Hensley
    3. Manfred Mann
    4. Thomas Jhonson (Anglagard)
    5. Mike Oldfield
    6. Evangelos Odysseus Papathanassiou
    7. Doug Inge
    8. Clive Nolan
    9. Mike Pinder
    10. Julian Colbeck

    The list is endless in Progressive Rock....The house of the keyboardists
     
    IvŠn

The name is Doug Ingle. At least if you mean the keyboarder of Iron Butterfly.


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 12 2010 at 17:14
Tony Banks
Rick Wakeman
Keith Emerson
Richard Wright

Something like that in roughly that order
Prog Rock: Founded on a fundamental misunderstanding of the word virtuoso.
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