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Obscure Non-Prog Music Facts

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presdoug View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote presdoug Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 16 2014 at 23:32
The two composer/conductors Gustav Mahler and Hans Pfitzner had a famous disagreement.
                     Pfitzner met Mahler and told him that he thought Wagner was a great composer because he was German.
              Mahler replied to the effect that music, like the Symphony, should encompass the whole world, everything.
                    Pftizner stormed out of the room.


Edited by presdoug - December 16 2014 at 23:33
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zappaholic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 17 2014 at 06:29
In 1969 a studio group called The Electric Indian released the single "Keem-O-Sabe", which charted in the top 20 in America.  Among the musicians on the record: a young Daryl Hall.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote presdoug Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 17 2014 at 16:57
Originally posted by zappaholic zappaholic wrote:

In 1969 a studio group called The Electric Indian released the single "Keem-O-Sabe", which charted in the top 20 in America.  Among the musicians on the record: a young Daryl Hall.


Cool! Also under the radar for many is the group from 1969 that Daryl Hall appeared in called Gulliver. They were strictly a studio band, with only one self titled debut album to their credit.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote presdoug Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 24 2014 at 11:33
Judy Garland liked the music of Frederick Delius.

When conductor Arturo Toscanini started working with the Berlin Philharmonic for the first time, the orchestra found him so demanding, that they nick-named him "Tosca-No-No."LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote presdoug Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 29 2014 at 17:15
Originally posted by presdoug presdoug wrote:

One hundred years ago, in 1913, the first complete recording of a symphony was made-Beethoven's Fifth, conducted by Artur Nikisch with the Berlin Philharmonic. It has been issued on CD on the Dutton label.

Nikisch was considered by many to be THE conductor of his day, until his death in the early 1920s. He conducted the world premiere of Bruckner's 7th Symphony in Leipzig, and the composer was present.

Nikisch was also interested in Mahler's music, and even conducted the first music from his 3rd Symphony, the inner movements, before the composer conducted the whole symphony later on.

Professor Hans Richter, another celebrated conductor, became very important in the late 19th, and first decade of the 20th Centuries. He conducted the world premieres of Bruckner's 4th and 8th Symphonies, and Elgar's First Symphony.
He retired around 1911, and unfortunately left no recordings.

American conductor Theodore Thomas, who died in the first decade of the 20th Century, was enormously important, being the director of many US concert premieres, including Bruckner's 4th and 7th Symphonies. He sometimes premiered musical works even before they had been done in Europe.

Leopold Stokowski had also a giant list of world premiere performances under his direction, including the American premieres of Elgar's Second Symphony, and Mahler's 8th Symphony and Das Lied Von Der Erde.
I am wrong about the first point. There was an earlier recording of a complete symphony, in Beethoven's Fifth, conducted by Friedrich Kark with the Odeon Orchestra in 1910!

Edited by presdoug - December 30 2014 at 05:52
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