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    Posted: February 01 2011 at 20:02
Available for your perusal, The Dark Elf File  http://darkelffile.blogspot.com/ , a journal of commentary on rock and literature.
 
The latest offering is Psychedelicide! The 69 Greatest Songs from the Psychedelic Age , but their are also lists on great concept albums, live albums, acoustic rock songs, etc., as well as album reviews. You may be interested to know that the next article will be a two-parter on the 50 greatest albums from the progressive rock era, which should be out in a week or so.
 
Stop by and drop a line! Commentary is always welcome.

P.S. Another essay you fellow  'prog-heads' may find of interest is this:  Classical Rock! The influence of Wolfgang, Ludwig and Johann Sebastian on Rock Music.

Cheers!

Edited by The Dark Elf - February 01 2011 at 20:08
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I just wanted to say that I love your work! Your style is very informative and honest and I can tell you truly have a passion for the music that you are discussing. I also think it's ironic how you recently reviewed two albums that I discovered just a few days ago: Days of Future Passed and Liege and Leif and perfectly worded my feelings on those records. I especially enjoyed the way you discussed how The Moody Blues and bands of the time made beautiful music, and it truly brought me back to a lot of popular music, and I realize that this is why I don't have a taste for it. However, I don't think that all new music is lacking this beauty (see Phideaux's Doomsday Afternoon or The Decemberists' The Hazards of Love, among others), but I agree that most of it is, exactly how you described it. All in all, two of my favorite reviews that I've seen on PA. I'll be certainly looking forward to reading your blog (the part about the Psychedelic Rock looks interesting). Keep up the good work!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 02 2011 at 20:08
Thanks so much Zombywoof  -- or would that be "the Zomby Woof behind your eyes"? (I love Over-Nite Sensation).
 
I appreciate the feedback. I look at things from a strictly subjective point of view (objectivity is highly overrated), and as a musician of 30 years and a lover of music of all kinds for even longer, it seems to me that there has been a definite and highly noticeable erosion of musical composition (or musical taste perhaps) beginning in the late 70s and continuing unabated up to the present. Oh sure, there are bands here and there that still put out amazing music (the bands you mentioned, for instance, or Tool, Gov't Mule, Cactus Tree, and even Radiohead occasionally); but for the most part we live in an aural wasteland of Diddies and Ga-Gas and Kanyes, and other infantile blather. And I will argue the point with anyone -- anytime, anywhere.
 
I have been reviewing literally a couple hundred albums for my next article (aptly titled "The Greatest Albums from the Progressive Rock Era" , Parts I and II), and it struck me how some rock albums from the 60s and 70s that I considered mediocre at the time are light years better than what is available now. Is that just me getting older and more curmudgeonly? Perhaps, but I don't think so. Particularly since my musical appetite is far more diverse than when I was a teen or in my 20's.
 
*Steps down quickly from soap box*
 
Ummm...sorry. Runaway hyperbole. Thanks again for the gratifying post. Cheers!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zombywoof Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 02 2011 at 20:35
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Thanks so much Zombywoof  -- or would that be "the Zomby Woof behind your eyes"? (I love Over-Nite Sensation).
 
I appreciate the feedback. I look at things from a strictly subjective point of view (objectivity is highly overrated), and as a musician of 30 years and a lover of music of all kinds for even longer, it seems to me that there has been a definite and highly noticeable erosion of musical composition (or musical taste perhaps) beginning in the late 70s and continuing unabated up to the present. Oh sure, there are bands here and there that still put out amazing music (the bands you mentioned, for instance, or Tool, Gov't Mule, Cactus Tree, and even Radiohead occasionally); but for the most part we live in an aural wasteland of Diddies and Ga-Gas and Kanyes, and other infantile blather. And I will argue the point with anyone -- anytime, anywhere.
 
I have been reviewing literally a couple hundred albums for my next article (aptly titled "The Greatest Albums from the Progressive Rock Era" , Parts I and II), and it struck me how some rock albums from the 60s and 70s that I considered mediocre at the time are light years better than what is available now. Is that just me getting older and more curmudgeonly? Perhaps, but I don't think so. Particularly since my musical appetite is far more diverse than when I was a teen or in my 20's.
 
*Steps down quickly from soap box*
 
Ummm...sorry. Runaway hyperbole. Thanks again for the gratifying post. Cheers!


I think that it's a matter of taste. People want that 'instant gratification' and they don't really want to sit and listen intently, many times, to every pitch on a Magma or Henry Cow album to get it! Personally, I enjoy music that is like this, but I've noticed that most folks find the current music more comfortable and easy to listen to. I really tried to bring creative music back through my school radio station. After sitting through 2 years of "Ga-Gas" and "Kanyes", I decided to bring some of the music that I was into to the airwaves, in hour long weekly shows. It was a ton of work and a ton of fun (hey, much like listening to prog!!), but I gave up after a year when I realized that I couldn't reach anyone who already had their ears and minds shut. I then came to the conclusion that there really isn't such thing as "good" or "bad": only music and individual tastes, and I have no taste for music that is very bland and unoriginal! I have a theory that in just a few years time, pop music will become so dull and lifeless that you won't be able to discern one note from the next and there will be no sense of identity or change what-so-ever.

I'm a musician, too (about 9 years on flute due to my Tull obsession!) and I also agree with your statement on the decline of popular music in the late 70's. Why is it that the majority of my favorite records were released between 1967-1975? I honestly believe that it has more to do with record companies than musicians. Have you seen the youtube Zappa interview on this very subject? If not: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZazEM8cgt0 .

I loved your blog on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, by the way! The whole thing is a sham. I can't believe that it took Jeff Beck nearly 40 years to be recognized! I was a huge fan before everybody thought so, because the TV told them he was cool. It was a small win to hear the guy from Phish say that Selling England By The Pound was his favorite Genesis record ... that made the whole thing worth watching!

Oh, and you could say that I'm just about as evil as a boogie man can be!


Edited by Zombywoof - February 02 2011 at 20:39
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 02 2011 at 22:29
Originally posted by Zombywoof Zombywoof wrote:

I'm a musician, too (about 9 years on flute due to my Tull obsession!) and I also agree with your statement on the decline of popular music in the late 70's. Why is it that the majority of my favorite records were released between 1967-1975? I honestly believe that it has more to do with record companies than musicians. Have you seen the youtube Zappa interview on this very subject? If not: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZazEM8cgt0.

I completely agree with your assessment regarding the music industry. There is a discussion on another thread on this forum about Tull's A Passion Play, and I made the comment that the album would not be released today by any major label because the industry does not want you to think. They aren't interested in album length songs like Thick as a Brick or lengthy suites like Supper's Ready because they cannot make money of single iPod downloads.
 
And I too play several Tull tunes ("Salamander", "Mother Goose" and all the acoustic sections from Thick as a Brick are my favorites to play). I've retired from bar bands but I still have several Ovations and Martins lying about that I pick up whenever possible.

Originally posted by Zombywoof Zombywoof wrote:

I loved your blog on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, by the way! The whole thing is a sham. I can't believe that it took Jeff Beck nearly 40 years to be recognized! I was a huge fan before everybody thought so, because the TV told them he was cool. It was a small win to hear the guy from Phish say that Selling England By The Pound was his favorite Genesis record ... that made the whole thing worth watching!
 
As I stated in the article you referred to, it is absolute asininity bordering on criminality that Jethro Tull, Yes, Rush, The Moody Blues and King Crimson are not in the RRHoF. Stupid! Ludicrous! But it is all based on a sinister cabal led by Jann Wenner, publisher of Rolling Stone, and stuffed-shirt critics like Dave Marsh and Robert Christgau,  to stop progressive rock bands from getting on the ballot. If they cannot get on the ballot, then the voters can't vote for them. They despise prog-rock, and have admitted as such.
 
Do you really think Genesis would've been elected to the RRHoF if they had quit being Genesis after Peter Gabriel left, or after they made Trick of the Tail and Wind and Wuthering and Steve Hackett left? They  were elected based for their banal 80s commerciialism, not for the grand music they made in the 70s. It is a joke.
 
Do what I did, boycott Rolling Stone magazine. It is no longer a rock and roll resource in any case, particularly since it now hands out 5 star ratings to hip-hop albums, which in itself is farcical.
 
 
 


Edited by The Dark Elf - February 02 2011 at 22:31
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Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:


I completely agree with your assessment regarding the music industry. There is a discussion on another thread on this forum about Tull's A Passion Play, and I made the comment that the album would not be released today by any major label because the industry does not want you to think. They aren't interested in album length songs like Thick as a Brick or lengthy suites like Supper's Ready because they cannot make money of single iPod downloads.

 

And I too play several Tull tunes ("Salamander", "Mother Goose" and all the acoustic sections from Thick as a Brick are my favorites to play). I've retired from bar bands but I still have several Ovations and Martins lying about that I pick up whenever possible.



Can you imagine a world without A Passion Play? That was probably my first prog love, as I grew up listening to it ... while other kids were listening to NSYNC songs, I was usually listening to my favorite "song", too! About iPods, did you hear the story recently where Roger Waters made all of the Pink Floyd albums available only as complete albums, not individual songs? And I agree with your statement, but I think it's not the industry that doesn't want you to think, it's the audience majority! I recently read the liner notes in an Egg remaster that pointed out how in the early 70's, prog and underground music was becoming popular, so record companies would create divisions in their company that specialized in these bands and sold them at a reduced price so as to attract listeners. Although I used to blame the companies, I now have concluded that record companies are into one thing, unfortunately: business. Basically, if it sells, they'll jump onto the band wagon!

I love all three Tull titles you mentioned, especially "Salamander"! I can play bits and pieces of "Thick as a Brick", as well as some sheet music that I have around my house.


Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

 

As I stated in the article you referred to, it is absolute asininity bordering on criminality that Jethro Tull, Yes, Rush, The Moody Blues and King Crimson are not in the RRHoF. Stupid! Ludicrous! But it is all based on a sinister cabal led by Jann Wenner, publisher of Rolling Stone, and stuffed-shirt critics like Dave Marsh and Robert Christgau,  to stop progressive rock bands from getting on the ballot. If they cannot get on the ballot, then the voters can't vote for them. They despise prog-rock, and have admitted as such.

 

Do you really think Genesis would've been elected to the RRHoF if they had quit being Genesis after Peter Gabriel left, or after they made Trick of the Tail and Wind and Wuthering and Steve Hackett left? They  were elected based for their banal 80s commerciialism, not for the grand music they made in the 70s. It is a joke.

 

Do what I did, boycott Rolling Stone magazine. It is no longer a rock and roll resource in any case, particularly since it now hands out 5 star ratings to hip-hop albums, which in itself is farcical.




The problem with boycotting Rolling Stone is that I'd have to start buying and reading it first! I've never had an interest or "time for Time magazine ... OR Rolling Stone" (sorry, I really couldn't resist the reference!). I have not heard Trick of the Tail or Wind and Wuthering, but Iíve heard all of the Gabriel material and bits and pieces of the self-titled album from the 80ís and I agree. The Genesis of the 70ís would never have made the Hall of Fame, because itís just not radio friendly and therefor the stations will not play it! Is it possible that if radio stations started playing Genesis (as opposed to what I call Genes-isnít), Rock Band had Frank Zappa tunes, and Facebook advertised for Tull concerts, that maybe the music might come back? Who knows. People donít seem to like to take chances, and the only way to get them into new music seems to be to be through mediums such as these. Itís amazing how, due to Guitar Hero, people my age are listening to Rush and Dream Theater! Itís really rather sad, if you ask me, that people want to play plastic instruments instead of real ones Ö but, oh well, that's another discussion entirely. Also, to do a Zappa rock band, the designers would have to come up with a plastic marimba somehow...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 03 2011 at 22:36
Originally posted by Zombywoof Zombywoof wrote:

Can you imagine a world without A Passion Play? That was probably my first prog love, as I grew up listening to it ... while other kids were listening to NSYNC songs, I was usually listening to my favorite "song", too! About iPods, did you hear the story recently where Roger Waters made all of the Pink Floyd albums available only as complete albums, not individual songs? And I agree with your statement, but I think it's not the industry that doesn't want you to think, it's the audience majority! I recently read the liner notes in an Egg remaster that pointed out how in the early 70's, prog and underground music was becoming popular, so record companies would create divisions in their company that specialized in these bands and sold them at a reduced price so as to attract listeners. Although I used to blame the companies, I now have concluded that record companies are into one thing, unfortunately: business. Basically, if it sells, they'll jump onto the band wagon!

 
Oh, I don't think you're giving enough emphasis on the dastardly things record companies do. They will take a genre or an underground sound and then twist it to their own sordid ends. They don't nuture a sound, they warp it and squeeze every bit of money out of it. They did it in the 50s and early 60s by having white groups and performers singing black R&B (Pat Boone, for god sakes!), they got a hold of psychedelia in the 60s and eventually had bubblegum bands playing it, they took hard rock of the 70s and made it corporate, until every major band sounded nearly identical: Foreigner, Boston, Journey, Styx, Kansas. When punk rock rebelled and the industry couldn't control the likes of the Sex Pistols, the Ramones or the Clash, they subtley mutated the sound and brought new wave and big hair bands into prominence -- bands that were easier to control and market to wider (and dumber) audiences.
 
Record companies spend immense amounts of money to control what you hear, to advertise their agendas and the bands they want heard. At one time in the early 60s, there was a "payola" scandal where record companies were paying radio disc jockeys tons of money to play their bands. Whoever paid the most got heard the most and advertised the most. They've gotten smarter since that scandal exploded but don't think it's not happening on a different level. Corporate sponsored concerts and such angered Neil Young so much he wrote a song "This Notes For You" in which he sang, "Ain't singin' for Pepsi/Ain't singin' for Coke/I don't sing for nobody//Makes me look like a joke/This note's for you." 

Originally posted by Zombywoof Zombywoof wrote:

I have not heard Trick of the Tail or Wind and Wuthering, but Iíve heard all of the Gabriel material and bits and pieces of the self-titled album from the 80ís and I agree. The Genesis of the 70ís would never have made the Hall of Fame, because itís just not radio friendly and therefor the stations will not play it!

 
 Trick of the Tail -and- Wind and Wuthering are  two of the best Genesis albums ever made, with or without Peter Gabriel. You definitely need to give them a listen. In fact, I would place Trick of the Tail second to only Foxtrot as Genesis' best. I never got hung up on the whole Peter Gabriel nonsense anyway, particularly because Gabriel made better albums without Genesis.


Edited by The Dark Elf - February 03 2011 at 22:37
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2011 at 13:52

Another article on the Dark Elf File:
Manic Progression! Great Albums from the Progressive Rock Era, Part I...

http://darkelffile.blogspot.com/2011/02/manic-progression-great-albums-from.html

The first installment of a three-part exposition on the sixty greatest rock albums from the Progressive Era (in my opinion, of course, but then subjectivity and blogs are relatively synonymous).

As always, your comments are welcome. Cheers!


Edited by The Dark Elf - February 15 2011 at 13:54
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AtomicCrimsonRush Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2011 at 15:02
I had a look at the zine and it was well written. Have you seen my blog on greatest prog albums through each year?
I am interested in the psychedelic movement myself and have many psych music.
 
That blog is kind of researched from the most popular albums here and on other websites, or at least those albums that have made an impact in some way on prog.
 
 
I am a researcher and a writer, in my spare time from teaching College English,  so I am always interested in new info on the prog albums.
 
I look forward to new zines from The Dark Elf File.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AtomicCrimsonRush Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2011 at 15:50
Reading the Prog Rock list there were no surprises as to most of those choices though it was interesting you chose Gabriel's debut, Gentle Giant's Octopus is a strange choice - perhaps their worst album IMHO, and I thought i had heard all the quintessential albums but then you added Procol Harum Live with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, Santana III is one of the only Santanas I dont have, so I will try to get hold of that, 
anyway, thanks for the list and the way you justify each inclusion is admirable.
But you are totally right in your disclaimer:
 
"Honestly, is it not enough to say that Close to the Edge and Thick as a Brick are truly great and important albums? Is it even necessary to stamp #1 on Dark Side of the Moon or Court of the Crimson King for them to receive validation as landmarks of their genre? I love all these albums in their own, eccentric manner, and each has been influential in my personal musical experience. As for omissions based on obscure personal preferences, critics' marginalia, and unrepresented sub-genres, make your own damned list. I am sure you will like it better."
 
haha, nice one! I know from my blogs the contentious issues that arise when compiling a list. Some of the choices do not seem to make sense but that's Prog!
 
 
maybe you could transfer some of your research here to a blog too!
 
on that note, I will continue now to read the jazz fusion section...
 


 EDIT: All those albums are worth mentioning esp Hot rats, Blow by Blow and Mahavishnu's debut!


Edited by AtomicCrimsonRush - February 15 2011 at 15:59
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2011 at 18:02
Originally posted by AtomicCrimsonRush AtomicCrimsonRush wrote:

Reading the Prog Rock list there were no surprises as to most of those choices though it was interesting you chose Gabriel's debut, Gentle Giant's Octopus is a strange choice - perhaps their worst album IMHO, and I thought i had heard all the quintessential albums but then you added Procol Harum Live with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, Santana III is one of the only Santanas I dont have, so I will try to get hold of that, anyway, thanks for the list and the way you justify each inclusion is admirable.
 
 
Thanks for dropping by ACR! Octopus is Gentle Giant's most accessible album, in my estimation. I am not a great Gentle Giant fan, in any case. The whole "progressive for progressive's sake" leaves them too cold for my blood. To me it's a toss up between Octopus and In a Glass House (which will appear in the next installment) as to which is their best. As far as Peter Gabriel's 1st album (Car), I remember hearing it in high school, and was blown away at how much more I enjoyed Gabriel without Genesis. I still do. Both the Procol Harum and Santana albums are amazing. Give them a listen.
 
 
Originally posted by AtomicCrimsonRush AtomicCrimsonRush wrote:

haha, nice one! I know from my blogs the contentious issues that arise when compiling a list. Some of the choices do not seem to make sense but that's Prog!
 
 
maybe you could transfer some of your research here to a blog too!
 
on that note, I will continue now to read the jazz fusion section...
 
 EDIT: All those albums are worth mentioning esp Hot rats, Blow by Blow and Mahavishnu's debut!
 
Choosing albums is a very individualized medium, but I am very firm on what I like and what I consider good, and as a musician I can appreciate really well done albums (whether they are prog, hard rock, blues, jazz or classical).
 
No, not another blog! One is enough for me, and I also write lengthy reviews for blogcritics.com, so I literally have no time!
 
And I'll be stopping by your site. Thanks again!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AtomicCrimsonRush Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 15 2011 at 21:27
Thanks Dark Elf
You know your blog kept me interested for hours today! I didnt get any house work done LOL
 
I learnt much from your attack on the Rock n Roll hall of fame. I posted some comments on your site
I learnt some good news too from the RnR hall of fame website..
!
 
Alice Cooper has been inducted in the HOF this year - by Rob Zombie!
 
There is hope for Rush after all.
 
Peace and prog on!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 16 2011 at 22:11
Originally posted by AtomicCrimsonRush AtomicCrimsonRush wrote:

Thanks Dark Elf
You know your blog kept me interested for hours today! I didnt get any house work done LOL
 
I learnt much from your attack on the Rock n Roll hall of fame. I posted some comments on your site
I learnt some good news too from the RnR hall of fame website..
!
 
Alice Cooper has been inducted in the HOF this year - by Rob Zombie!
 
There is hope for Rush after all.
 
Peace and prog on!
 
I'm glad my literary style stalled your work ambitions. Wink
 
Yes, Cooper got voted in after I wrote the piece you were referring to. However, it's ludicrous and a sham that Yes, Rush, Jethro Tull, Moody Blues, and King Crimson weren't inducted 10 or 20 years ago. As I stated, it is plain that there is an obvious predjudice against prog at the HOF, and it is due to Jann Wenner, Dave Marsh and other other New York twits who can't stand progressive rock. They won't even allow those bands on the ballot for voters to choose. It is utter B.S.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 23 2011 at 14:15
More Manic Progression! Great Albums from the Progressive Rock Era, Part II...

 
The second installment of a three-part exposition on the sixty greatest rock albums from the Progressive Era (in my opinion, of course, but then subjectivity and blogs are relatively synonymous).
 
As always, your comments are welcome. Cheers!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote avestin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 26 2011 at 18:17
I enjoyed reading it, thanks


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 26 2011 at 18:48
Originally posted by avestin avestin wrote:

I enjoyed reading it, thanks


 
No, thank you for stopping by!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote progismylife Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 26 2011 at 18:55
I saw the link in your signature and started reading. It's great! Keep it up!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote avestin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 26 2011 at 21:53
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by avestin avestin wrote:

I enjoyed reading it, thanks


 
No, thank you for stopping by!

Will you also cover more recent periods of progressive music "activity"? I'd be interested in reading your take of, say, 90s so-called resurgence of progressive music.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 26 2011 at 22:42
Originally posted by avestin avestin wrote:

Will you also cover more recent periods of progressive music "activity"? I'd be interested in reading your take of, say, 90s so-called resurgence of progressive music.  
 
The final 20 album installment of the current piece will include an added extra bit on my favorite "new era" albums, but I am going to devote a separate article in regards to newer albums of, as you say, the "so-called resurgence of progressive music".
 
To be honest, what a lot of posters on this forum refer to as progressive music bears little resemblance to what we of an older generation would refer to as "prog". For instance, I find it hard to categorize a thrash or death metal band like Opeth as "progressive". Just because they throw in some progressive flourishes here and there does not make up for the idiotic growling and shrieking. Growling and shrieking were never a hallmark of classical, folk or jazz influenced prog bands of the 70s. It is really unfortunate and detracts from their music, and the lead singer has a fine voice when he doesn't imitate an extra from The Exorcist. They seem to have more influences from older bands like  Korn or even Type O Negative than bands like Yes or ELP.
And your little sister's immaculate virginity wings away on the bony shoulders of a young horse named George who stole surreptitiously into her geography revision.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote avestin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 26 2011 at 22:56
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by avestin avestin wrote:

Will you also cover more recent periods of progressive music "activity"? I'd be interested in reading your take of, say, 90s so-called resurgence of progressive music.  
 
The final 20 album installment of the current piece will include an added extra bit on my favorite "new era" albums, but I am going to devote a separate article in regards to newer albums of, as you say, the "so-called resurgence of progressive music".
 
To be honest, what a lot of posters on this forum refer to as progressive music bears little resemblance to what we of an older generation would refer to as "prog". For instance, I find it hard to categorize a thrash or death metal band like Opeth as "progressive". Just because they throw in some progressive flourishes here and there does not make up for the idiotic growling and shrieking. Growling and shrieking were never a hallmark of classical, folk or jazz influenced prog bands of the 70s. It is really unfortunate and detracts from their music, and the lead singer has a fine voice when he doesn't imitate an extra from The Exorcist. They seem to have more influences from older bands like  Korn or even Type O Negative than bands like Yes or ELP.

Well, I was referring more to the 90s resurgence in the form of Angalgard, Anekdoten, Par Lindh Project. Echolyn etc. or the later bands in the end of the 90s and beginning of the 00s.

But I disagree with regards to Opeth's progressiveness. I don't find it hard at all to categorize any metal band as progressive regardless of the type of vocals. I don't see how the vocals would make it unprogressive. You may not like them, that's perfectly understandable, but it doesn't make Opeth not progressive. They don't just "throw in some progressive flourishes" you need to listen much more carefully than that. And in the case of Opeth he him self, Akerfeldt, admits to draw influence as much from classic rock and prog (Camel, Deep Purple and others) as from old school metal. But I don't compare them to "classic prog", I just hear (and am not alone) progressive writing in their music and in other metal bands, whether they be the "classic" prog metal or the extreme ones. 

Anyway, that is not my intention to discuss Opeth's music or metal, I was more interested whether you'd cover more recent prog eras and the various scenes (American, Scandinavian, French, Japanese etc). 




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