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Poll Question: How do you take it?
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The Pessimist View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Tea
    Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:00
*sips tea*

It's a valid question! Curious how you all take it, if at all.

Milk no sugar for me
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:01
No milk, sugar. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:06
Sugar ruins tea. Milk in tea - I guess chai is like that a little but it seems very odd to me.
 
Tea is such a different thing in the States than the U.K. I think. I drink up to 2 liters a day of iced unsweetened tea. Sweet tea is popular around here. I drink hot tea of all kinds on special occasions, my favorite being oolong.
 
Pretty typical - developed by the Chinese, adopted by the British, guzzled by the Americans.
You are quite a fine person, and I am very fond of you. But you are only quite a little fellow, in a wide world, after all.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:06
If it's hot tea I put nothing in it.

But I live in the South of the US, and sweet tea is wonderful.  Made a pitcher yesterday.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:16
Originally posted by Negoba Negoba wrote:

Sugar ruins tea. Milk in tea - I guess chai is like that a little but it seems very odd to me.
 
Tea is such a different thing in the States than the U.K. I think. I drink up to 2 liters a day of iced unsweetened tea. Sweet tea is popular around here. I drink hot tea of all kinds on special occasions, my favorite being oolong.
 
Pretty typical - developed by the Chinese, adopted by the British, guzzled by the Americans.
It's not just the cultural thing, but also the type of tea in question - milk in properly brewed¹ black tea (Assam), but not in green, white or oolong .. and similar for sugar, teas that are naturally sweet, like green or white, do not require sugar, but for some of the more bitter Indian blends - it's a matter of personal taste.
 
 
 
¹I found that in the US most restaurants brew tea at the same temperature as coffee, and that's not hot enough to develop the real flavour.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:18
Lemon !!! (or lime) and a bit of sugar...
 
but you gotta wait for it to cool down a bit... in other words those pouring near-boiling water on lemon have got it all wrong... you're cooking the lemon, then... yuuuck!!
 
-----------------------------------
 
 
Gotta a be a slimy limey to put milk in tea (bloody savageswho think they ruled the world with their 5--O'clock ceremonies, when they let the other savages Picts and Scots conquer, then they pillaged the planet over) Tongue
 
Here I go getting in trouble with Dean again!!!WinkLOL Bob should appreciate, thoughBig smile


Edited by Sean Trane - June 24 2011 at 08:31
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:25
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by Negoba Negoba wrote:

Sugar ruins tea. Milk in tea - I guess chai is like that a little but it seems very odd to me.
 
Tea is such a different thing in the States than the U.K. I think. I drink up to 2 liters a day of iced unsweetened tea. Sweet tea is popular around here. I drink hot tea of all kinds on special occasions, my favorite being oolong.
 
Pretty typical - developed by the Chinese, adopted by the British, guzzled by the Americans.
It's not just the cultural thing, but also the type of tea in question - milk in properly brewed¹ black tea (Assam), but not in green, white or oolong .. and similar for sugar, teas that are naturally sweet, like green or white, do not require sugar, but for some of the more bitter Indian blends - it's a matter of personal taste.
 
 
 
¹I found that in the US most restaurants brew tea at the same temperature as coffee, and that's not hot enough to develop the real flavour.
 
But I've way too many UK citizens pouring boiling water over the tea, and that's not doing youself a favour either...you're over-brewing it... especially black teas....
 
although with over-smoked lapsuchong or watchemacallit teas, it doesn't matter anyway... you feel like drinking from an ashtray)
 
 
Nope if you're waiting for your water to heavy boil, it's way too hot... The water should be simmering (frémissant in French), which means roughly 95°C...  so the surface should have ripples, but not boils
 
-------------------------------------
 
I much prefer green teas anyway... drink it like the Arabs and Africans do (but not nearly as sweet)
 
Don't like the third tea either (which means that they use the same tea three times, everytime with much less sugar....
 
 


Edited by Sean Trane - June 24 2011 at 08:28
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:28
Milk, sugar. LOL
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:43
Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

 
But I've way too many UK citizens pouring boiling water over the tea, and that's not doing youself a favour either...you're over-brewing it... especially black teas....
 
although with over-smoked lapsuchong or watchemacallit teas, it doesn't matter anyway... you feel like drinking from an ashtray)
 
 
Nope if you're waiting for your water to heavy boil, it's way too hot... The water should be simmering (frémissant in French), which means roughly 95°C...  so the surface should have ripples, but not boils
 
As I said - it depends on the type of tea, and even in black teas it depends on the variety - Brits prefer strong Indian tea, and that requires freshly boiled water (between 98-99°C) that still contains plenty of oxygen in it (never re-boil the water). The way the French brew tea is okay - that odd 3°C isn't going to make as much difference, it just takes a little longer to brew - anyway, the French (and Belgians) brew far better coffee than tea - we're getting better at coffee, but still tend to over-roast the beans to bitterness.


Edited by Dean - June 24 2011 at 08:44
"You know what uranium is, right?
It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
Including some bad things.
But nobody talks about that."
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 08:49
I don't drink as much tea as I should, but echoing Dean a bit it depends on the type of tea.  Black tea I will take with milk and sugar; green tea I add nothing.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 09:25
Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

 
Gotta a be a slimy limey to put milk in tea (bloody savageswho think they ruled the world with their 5--O'clock ceremonies, when they let the other savages Picts and Scots conquer, then they pillaged the planet over) Tongue
 
Here I go getting in trouble with Dean again!!!WinkLOL Bob should appreciate, thoughBig smile
Pah! Bloody amateur. LOL As I have said on many occasions - you cannot insult the British... limey - because British sailors had citrus fruit as part of their rations - kept away the scurvy; slimey - wily cunning - that's our Norman heritage; savages - that's out Saxon heritage; pillaging - that's our Viking heritage. 5 o'clock ceremonies - that's called civilisation, you may remember it from your history books, I think we got that from the Romans.

Edited by Dean - June 24 2011 at 09:28
"You know what uranium is, right?
It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
Including some bad things.
But nobody talks about that."
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 09:43
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

 
Gotta a be a slimy limey to put milk in tea (bloody savageswho think they ruled the world with their 5--O'clock ceremonies, when they let the other savages Picts and Scots conquer, then they pillaged the planet over) Tongue
 
Here I go getting in trouble with Dean again!!!WinkLOL Bob should appreciate, thoughBig smile
Pah! Bloody amateur. LOL As I have said on many occasions - you cannot insult the British... limey - because British sailors had citrus fruit as part of their rations - kept away the scurvy; slimey - wily cunning - that's our Norman heritage; savages - that's out Saxon heritage; pillaging - that's our Viking heritage. 5 o'clock ceremonies - that's called civilisation, you may remember it from your history books, I think we got that from the Romans.
 
funny that the English are so secular and insular, except when it comes to finding responsability for their flaws PigLOL
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 09:51
Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

 
Gotta a be a slimy limey to put milk in tea (bloody savageswho think they ruled the world with their 5--O'clock ceremonies, when they let the other savages Picts and Scots conquer, then they pillaged the planet over) Tongue
 
Here I go getting in trouble with Dean again!!!WinkLOL Bob should appreciate, thoughBig smile
Pah! Bloody amateur. LOL As I have said on many occasions - you cannot insult the British... limey - because British sailors had citrus fruit as part of their rations - kept away the scurvy; slimey - wily cunning - that's our Norman heritage; savages - that's out Saxon heritage; pillaging - that's our Viking heritage. 5 o'clock ceremonies - that's called civilisation, you may remember it from your history books, I think we got that from the Romans.
funny that the English are so secular and insular, except when it comes to finding responsability for their flaws PigLOL
Secular?? Confused Ermm  ... not of this church at least. LOL
 
But yup - that's true - that's why we always see the funny side of any stereotyped insult, since it cannot possibly apply to us personally, but some generic conglomeration of our national identity that we can chose to associate or disassociate with on a whim
 
 ...and I can see you are jealous from here.Wink
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It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 10:00
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:

 
Gotta a be a slimy limey to put milk in tea (bloody savageswho think they ruled the world with their 5--O'clock ceremonies, when they let the other savages Picts and Scots conquer, then they pillaged the planet over) Tongue
 
Here I go getting in trouble with Dean again!!!WinkLOL Bob should appreciate, thoughBig smile
Pah! Bloody amateur. LOL As I have said on many occasions - you cannot insult the British... limey - because British sailors had citrus fruit as part of their rations - kept away the scurvy; slimey - wily cunning - that's our Norman heritage; savages - that's out Saxon heritage; pillaging - that's our Viking heritage. 5 o'clock ceremonies - that's called civilisation, you may remember it from your history books, I think we got that from the Romans.
funny that the English are so secular and insular, except when it comes to finding responsability for their flaws PigLOL
Secular?? Confused Ermm  ... not of this church at least. LOL
 
But yup - that's true - that's why we always see the funny side of any stereotyped insult, since it cannot possibly apply to us personally, but some generic conglomeration of our national identity that we can chose to associate or disassociate with on a whim
 
 ...and I can see you are jealous from here.Wink
 
 
Like you've got nooooooo idea!!!!!!!! LOLLOLLOLLOLLOL
 
 
 
 
 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 10:00
I put nothing in tea but lemon. Usually it's just half, but sometimes I use a whole lemon. I can't stand sweetened tea at all.


Edited by A Person - June 24 2011 at 10:01
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 10:50
No LEMON, please in a real tea. No milk as well and no sugar please, except in maroccan mint tea of course.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 10:54
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by Sean Trane Sean Trane wrote:


But I've way too many UK citizens pouring boiling water over the tea, and that's not doing youself a favour either...you're over-brewing it... especially black teas....


although with over-smoked lapsuchong or watchemacallit teas, it doesn't matter anyway... you feel like drinking from an ashtray)



Nope if you're waiting for your water to heavy boil, it's way too hot... The water should be simmering (frémissant in French), which means roughly 95°C... so the surface should have ripples, but not boils


As I said - it depends on the type of tea, and even in black teas it depends on the variety - Brits prefer strong Indian tea, and that requires freshly boiled water (between 98-99°C) that still contains plenty of oxygen in it (never re-boil the water). The way the French brew tea is okay - that odd 3°C isn't going to make as much difference, it just takes a little longer to brew - anyway, the French (and Belgians) brew far better coffee than tea - we're getting better at coffee, but still tend to over-roast the beans to bitterness.


The infusion time, the temperature and even the teapot shape (which influences temperature according to its shape) depends from one strain to another. For example, white tea (the best) is not easy to prepare well, requires 70°C and from 10 to 25 minutes of infusion; several passes can be made.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 11:04
Generally, no sugar, no milk, and a definite preference for Earl Grey.  Constant Comment's English Breakfast and good old Lipton and Twinning's Irish Breakfast are also preferred.  A light bit of sugar can occassionaly compliment my first two choices.
Tea is too delicate for milk.  Milk masks everything.  On the other hand, I rarely drink coffee without milk.
The worst tea I ever had had rosehips in it. 

Edited by ghost_of_morphy - June 24 2011 at 11:08
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 11:17
Never milk, that is just grotesque.  Sugar if it is something black.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 24 2011 at 11:18
I don't like flavored teas, it's not real tea. Except some traditional arabic teas, but there are traditional blends.
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