Forum Home Forum Home > Progressive Music Lounges > Prog Music Lounge
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Prog Production Values Over The Years
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Topic ClosedProg Production Values Over The Years

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 2345>
Author
Message
rogerthat View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer


Joined: September 03 2006
Location: .
Status: Offline
Points: 7659
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 24 2011 at 00:41
Nice track! I remember this band from a few years back when I was really into metal.  Lately, have been sampling the 2011 album of Unexpect and hope to acquire it sometime soon.   But I'd already call what I heard of the Unexpect album as metal music for the 21st century - all the madness and pulverising force of 90s extreme metal but without its repetition and limited basket of influences. 

Yeah, RJD is definitely one of my all time favourite singers!  But not all melodic metal works as well not least because very few melodic metal singers can sing like Dio.  I love Rainbow and the Dio Sabbath.


Edited by rogerthat - December 24 2011 at 00:42
Back to Top
cstack3 View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar
VIP Member

Joined: July 20 2009
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Status: Offline
Points: 3415
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 24 2011 at 01:23
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Nice track! I remember this band from a few years back when I was really into metal.  Lately, have been sampling the 2011 album of Unexpect and hope to acquire it sometime soon.   But I'd already call what I heard of the Unexpect album as metal music for the 21st century - all the madness and pulverising force of 90s extreme metal but without its repetition and limited basket of influences. 

Yeah, RJD is definitely one of my all time favourite singers!  But not all melodic metal works as well not least because very few melodic metal singers can sing like Dio.  I love Rainbow and the Dio Sabbath.

Thanks for your vote of confidence, Roger!  I don't consider myself a metal connoisseur by any means, but "I know what I like!"  That song sure has some energy! 

Poor RJD, what a loss!  I saw his tour with his own band after Sabbath broke up, it was a great show!  Geezer came onstage to jam with the encore, that was the beginning of the "Heaven & Hell" reunion.  RIP Ronny!   Anyway, Ronnie was a guy who could appreciate a good keyboard part integrated into metal, I miss that. 

Rock on & Merry Christmas! Beer
Back to Top
zumacraig View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: December 10 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1299
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 24 2011 at 08:01
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Originally posted by zumacraig zumacraig wrote:

Originally posted by irrelevant irrelevant wrote:

I just hate those cheesy keyboards on modern prog albums. 

it's gotten a bit better over the years.


Somewhat better!  

As a dyed-in-the-wool Mellotron freak, I really enjoyed the rich palette of sounds this instrument brought to so many of our favorite works.   Much of this is from the fact that each note on the Mellotron was recorded by a living musician....so, if you played the violin tapes, you heard the bow inflection of numerous artists playing numerous instruments!  Same for other strings and woodwinds. 

It is impossible to re-create this sonic richness with modern digital technology, no matter how good.  Modern synth string patches drive me nuts (I have digital samples from a pristine studio Mellotron that I use, so I trigger ancient analog samples with digital means, quite different).  

Not that modern instrumentation isn't impressive, but the sound of keys on stuff like Dream Theater leave me a bit cold.  

i def prefer vintage over digital any day.  the straight synth leads, mellotron, rhodes and organ have definitely improved when it comes to the digital format.  

as for dream theater, the thing that keeps me coming back to them is the great songs and melodies that i just sing out loud with :)  the icing on the cake is when there is a memorable guitar solo or jordan uses some vintage sounding patch.
Back to Top
cstack3 View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar
VIP Member

Joined: July 20 2009
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Status: Offline
Points: 3415
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 24 2011 at 16:55
Originally posted by zumacraig zumacraig wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Originally posted by zumacraig zumacraig wrote:

Originally posted by irrelevant irrelevant wrote:

I just hate those cheesy keyboards on modern prog albums. 

it's gotten a bit better over the years.


Somewhat better!  

As a dyed-in-the-wool Mellotron freak, I really enjoyed the rich palette of sounds this instrument brought to so many of our favorite works.   Much of this is from the fact that each note on the Mellotron was recorded by a living musician....so, if you played the violin tapes, you heard the bow inflection of numerous artists playing numerous instruments!  Same for other strings and woodwinds. 

It is impossible to re-create this sonic richness with modern digital technology, no matter how good.  Modern synth string patches drive me nuts (I have digital samples from a pristine studio Mellotron that I use, so I trigger ancient analog samples with digital means, quite different).  

Not that modern instrumentation isn't impressive, but the sound of keys on stuff like Dream Theater leave me a bit cold.  

i def prefer vintage over digital any day.  the straight synth leads, mellotron, rhodes and organ have definitely improved when it comes to the digital format.  

as for dream theater, the thing that keeps me coming back to them is the great songs and melodies that i just sing out loud with :)  the icing on the cake is when there is a memorable guitar solo or jordan uses some vintage sounding patch.

Don't get me wrong, I really do love Dream Theater!  Patrucci is probably the best guitarist alive right now, except for when Fripp decides to turn it on (rarely anymore).  Jordan is quite amazing, hands-down one of the best! 

I've especially enjoyed their cover versions of other songs, and I once saw Patrucci and Howe onstage together, playing Yes tunes.  Poor Steve looked very old and lost, compared to Patrucci! 

That being said, I think their engineering on their CDs is a bit sterile.  I'd enjoy hearing Jordan wail on an old Hammond B3 with all of its clankiness, they are remarkably rich instruments!   And, I'm not sure that he plays genuine Mellotron samples, those are a lot of fun!  

Happy Holidays, listen to good music & be joyful! 
Back to Top
BrufordFreak View Drop Down
Collaborator
Collaborator
Avatar
Honorary Collaborator

Joined: January 25 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Status: Offline
Points: 1993
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 10:56
I've always disliked the gaited drums effect brought on (I've heard) by Phil Collins' rise to rock stardom. The return to more open spectrum and duration of the recording of drums has been 'music to my ears.' Embarrassed Seems a lot of recent bands have attempted some return to "old" sounds in their recordings (Djam Karet, Dungen, Ritual, Diagonal, Algernon, maudlin of the Well, Ciccada, Frogg Café, Samsara Blues Experiment, Wobbler, The Amazing are a few that come to mind). I like it.
Drew Fisher,
Prog Is Alive and Well in the 21st Century,
Second Cloud on the Left Farm

La Farge, Wisconsin
Back to Top
zumacraig View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: December 10 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1299
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 11:08


Don't get me wrong, I really do love Dream Theater!  Patrucci is probably the best guitarist alive right now, except for when Fripp decides to turn it on (rarely anymore).  Jordan is quite amazing, hands-down one of the best! 

I've especially enjoyed their cover versions of other songs, and I once saw Patrucci and Howe onstage together, playing Yes tunes.  Poor Steve looked very old and lost, compared to Patrucci! 

That being said, I think their engineering on their CDs is a bit sterile.  I'd enjoy hearing Jordan wail on an old Hammond B3 with all of its clankiness, they are remarkably rich instruments!   And, I'm not sure that he plays genuine Mellotron samples, those are a lot of fun!  

Happy Holidays, listen to good music & be joyful! 
[/QUOTE]

agree on all points.  recent DT albums have had no dynamics at all.  just a wall of sound.  i do wish there was some space between instruments like you said.  also would to hear the bass higher in the mix.  jordan on a B3 would be crazy!
Back to Top
zumacraig View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: December 10 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1299
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 11:09
Originally posted by BrufordFreak BrufordFreak wrote:

I've always disliked the gaited drums effect brought on (I've heard) by Phil Collins' rise to rock stardom. The return to more open spectrum and duration of the recording of drums has been 'music to my ears.' Embarrassed Seems a lot of recent bands have attempted some return to "old" sounds in their recordings (Djam Karet, Dungen, Ritual, Diagonal, Algernon, maudlin of the Well, Ciccada, Frogg Café, Samsara Blues Experiment, Wobbler, The Amazing are a few that come to mind). I like it.

Def Djam Karet.  they even had great drum sounds in the 90s.
Back to Top
Tapfret View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Eclectic & C/JRF Prog Team

Joined: August 12 2007
Location: Arlington, Wash
Status: Offline
Points: 4648
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 19:42
The scope of  production techniques and production values are a lot broader than the OP's thesis. Yes, in general terms amongst the artists with the most resources, the productions seem to be fairly generic. That is part of why I have so much appreciation for Pain of Salvation's Road Salt albums. They went out of their way to really flatten and dry out the sound. It really allowed the musical equation to be of more importance than the sound.
There is no act more pretentious and self-indulgent than labeling another's art as pretentious and self-indulgent.
Always copy to clipboard before clicking Post Reply.
Back to Top
zumacraig View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: December 10 2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1299
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 19:56
Originally posted by Tapfret Tapfret wrote:

The scope of  production techniques and production values are a lot broader than the OP's thesis. Yes, in general terms amongst the artists with the most resources, the productions seem to be fairly generic. That is part of why I have so much appreciation for Pain of Salvation's Road Salt albums. They went out of their way to really flatten and dry out the sound. It really allowed the musical equation to be of more importance than the sound.

so which is it?  you say my thesis is flawed then you agree with it in the next sentence.  i would say that PoS' output is an example of that samey, 'clinical ' production discussed in this thread.  put a PoS release up against 5 other main releases this year and they all sound the same.  glad you can hear the differences.  
Back to Top
rogerthat View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer


Joined: September 03 2006
Location: .
Status: Offline
Points: 7659
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 20:26
^^^  Given how scattered and fragmented the music scene of today is, that probably only reflects what YOU have personally heard and maybe you have also not heard all that many contemporary/modern albums, I don't know and can't comment on that. I like the way Radiohead and Dave Matthews Band produce their albums, though the latter can raise the level of drums in the mix a tad too much for my liking.  I loved the way Josh Brion produced When the Pawn...for Fiona Apple.  The Remember Shakti live album is just terrific.  Electric Wizard is pretty raw and 'intentionally imperfect' too.  These are all, as I am sure you've noticed, from different genres. I don't think your typical DT or SX release reflect contemporary production anymore than Yes or Genesis reflect the sound of 70s prog, which, in truth, is not a whole lot at all.

I also think some of us may be getting nostalgic for the sake of scratches and just flat out poor audio reproduction in the old recordings, which was probably unintentional.  I am sure given a choice, most bands would want a clear and full sound.  In my country, we got to hear clear recordings only in the 90s and we didn't necessarily miss the flaws of the old. I don't think those bands, other than EW, lack in dynamics and especially DMB even has a good deal of looseness and improvisation, so the clinical feeling you talk about is possibly also a compositional and performing choice.  There are listeners and musicians today who do want very clinical-sounding albums. But not everybody is not on that bandwagon.  
Back to Top
cstack3 View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar
VIP Member

Joined: July 20 2009
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Status: Offline
Points: 3415
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 20:33
Originally posted by thehallway thehallway wrote:

^ It would be interesting to use it on instruments. i.e. you play a rhythm with just one note, then use autotune to alter the pitch of different parts of that rhythm, then suddenly, you have a melody. The timbre would be different though, with higher notes artificially squashed and lower notes stretched out. Would be similar to some of the things the Beatles did with tape speeds on Sgt Pepper.

You'd have to execute this in such a way that it doesn't just sound like you've recorded something normally but badly!


Well, I THOUGHT Auto-Tune had a place in prog!  Hell, we INVENTED it!  2:10 in this classic (old age has its advantages, I saw this tour twice, amazing!!)  


Back to Top
Tapfret View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Eclectic & C/JRF Prog Team

Joined: August 12 2007
Location: Arlington, Wash
Status: Offline
Points: 4648
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 25 2011 at 21:50
Originally posted by zumacraig zumacraig wrote:

Originally posted by Tapfret Tapfret wrote:

The scope of  production techniques and production values are a lot broader than the OP's thesis. Yes, in general terms amongst the artists with the most resources, the productions seem to be fairly generic. That is part of why I have so much appreciation for Pain of Salvation's Road Salt albums. They went out of their way to really flatten and dry out the sound. It really allowed the musical equation to be of more importance than the sound.

so which is it?  you say my thesis is flawed then you agree with it in the next sentence.  i would say that PoS' output is an example of that samey, 'clinical ' production discussed in this thread.  put a PoS release up against 5 other main releases this year and they all sound the same.  glad you can hear the differences.  


You do not understand the difference between "general terms" and a specific example? I'll give you a hint: the concepts are not "samey".  Nonetheless, if you can't hear the production differences between the Road Salt albums and any of the previous PoS albums, then little value will come of further discussion.
There is no act more pretentious and self-indulgent than labeling another's art as pretentious and self-indulgent.
Always copy to clipboard before clicking Post Reply.
Back to Top
richardh View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 18 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 12975
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 04:02
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Originally posted by thehallway thehallway wrote:

^ It would be interesting to use it on instruments. i.e. you play a rhythm with just one note, then use autotune to alter the pitch of different parts of that rhythm, then suddenly, you have a melody. The timbre would be different though, with higher notes artificially squashed and lower notes stretched out. Would be similar to some of the things the Beatles did with tape speeds on Sgt Pepper.

You'd have to execute this in such a way that it doesn't just sound like you've recorded something normally but badly!


Well, I THOUGHT Auto-Tune had a place in prog!  Hell, we INVENTED it!  2:10 in this classic (old age has its advantages, I saw this tour twice, amazing!!)  


 
This one needs explaing (well to me anyway)
 
Around the 2.10 mark you get the 'robot voice'Confused
Back to Top
harmonium.ro View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator

Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

Joined: August 18 2008
Location: Anna Calvi
Status: Offline
Points: 22989
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 13:23
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

I loved the way Josh Brion produced When the Pawn...for Fiona Apple. 


That is such a brilliant sounding album. Jon Brian is a great producer (his Eternal Sunshine OST is also fantastic).
Back to Top
richardh View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 18 2004
Location: United Kingdom
Status: Offline
Points: 12975
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 14:37
Originally posted by zumacraig zumacraig wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Originally posted by twosteves twosteves wrote:

I think Offord did a great production job on some early Yes albums--I wish I could say the same about some early Genesis albums---
 
Offord also worked on ELP albums up to and inc Trilogy as the main sound production engineer (although Greg Lake took the main production credit).
Trilogy is probably my favourite ELP album production. Wonderfull clarity and no messing with Greg Lake's voice which is full ,wamr and rich. Brain Salad Surgery was a noticeably different approach , much more compressed and loads of vocal distortion which I hate. It was about 1973 that the natural warm full production sound seemed to disappear. For me DSOTM , Relayer and BSS were all steps in the wrong direction even if musically the bands were becoming more creative.
 
The eighties was a real mixed bag production wise. Some brilliant stuff ( Kate Bush - Hounds Of Love and Al Stewarts ridiclulously undervalued Last Days Of The Century) but on the prog side i didn't care much for Marillions Fugazi or IQ's Nomzamo. Rush probably came up with my favourite 80's produced album (Power Windows) followed by IQ's Are You Sitting Comfortably?, the common denominator being Peter Collins. Someone had a clue at least.
 
The 90's was interesting as Par Lindh Project and Anglagard went for retro production techniques. Gothic Impressions and Hybris almost stand alone. Not sure it really caught on though.
 
Since then the only album that I loved from a production point of view has been Muse  - Absolution. Apparently they did some unusual things when recording that album (In Ireland I think) like using an empty swimming pool for the drums. The result is certainly unique and very impressive. I quite like the way Radiohead record their albums as well. They seem to have the modern way of doing things off to a fine art.

i guess that's my hope...now that digital recording is a given, i think we can figure out how to use it to sound more natural.  oh, and songs need to be memorable.  this is another issue with recent prog that i won't get into.  radio head's recent productions have been excellent.  i'm with you on that.  thing of what all these prog bands would sound like with nigel goodrich producing.  would be amazing.

as far as offord goes, what was up with his production on union:)

as far a rush goes, i think they found the best sounding production type for prog with moving pictures through grace under pressure.  it sounds like and warm at the same time.  again, what happened?   :)
 
I think Rush were at their creative best through those albums you mention but production wise i consider those to be adequate and no more. Power Windows leaps out of the speakers like some possessed thing.
 
BTW I got it wrong about Peter Collins producing IQ's Are You Sitting Comfortably? ,  I got my Rush producers mixed up and it was in fact Terry Brown. I still like it thoughSmile


Edited by richardh - December 26 2011 at 14:37
Back to Top
cstack3 View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar
VIP Member

Joined: July 20 2009
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Status: Offline
Points: 3415
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 15:30
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Originally posted by thehallway thehallway wrote:

^ It would be interesting to use it on instruments. i.e. you play a rhythm with just one note, then use autotune to alter the pitch of different parts of that rhythm, then suddenly, you have a melody. The timbre would be different though, with higher notes artificially squashed and lower notes stretched out. Would be similar to some of the things the Beatles did with tape speeds on Sgt Pepper.

You'd have to execute this in such a way that it doesn't just sound like you've recorded something normally but badly!


Well, I THOUGHT Auto-Tune had a place in prog!  Hell, we INVENTED it!  2:10 in this classic (old age has its advantages, I saw this tour twice, amazing!!)  


 
This one needs explaing (well to me anyway)
 
Around the 2.10 mark you get the 'robot voice'Confused

Yup, that was the early prototype of today's "Autotune" craze!  You hear nearly the exact voice used for Motorola "Droid" smart phone ads.  

Similar approach....Emerson would speak into the mike mounted above his keyboards, and the software would modulate his voice, add effects & change the pitch automatically.   1974 technology ripped off by 2011 rap artists!!  


Back to Top
thehallway View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: April 13 2010
Location: Dorset, England
Status: Offline
Points: 1433
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 16:39

Vocoder? ^




Back to Top
Dean View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Retired Admin and Amateur Layabout

Joined: May 13 2007
Location: Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 37331
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 17:07

Eh? What!!! "software" in 1974??? No - any hardware that used software would have filled a small room back in 1974.

Karn Evil 9 used a Moog Vocoder - a completely electronic analogue device, and as such wasn't even new in 1974 - anyone old enough will remember Sparky's Magic Piano. Autotune is a different device using a different technology, in terms of product development there is no connection between a vocoder and Autotune, one is not the forerunner of the other.
 
Autotune can be used ot make robot vioces and weird pitch shifts and modulations in a vocal but that isn't its main use, it is designed for pitch correction and used properly most people won't even notice when it is being used.
"You know what uranium is, right?
It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
Including some bad things.
But nobody talks about that."
Back to Top
cstack3 View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar
VIP Member

Joined: July 20 2009
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Status: Offline
Points: 3415
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 17:39
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Eh? What!!! "software" in 1974??? No - any hardware that used software would have filled a small room back in 1974.

Karn Evil 9 used a Moog Vocoder - a completely electronic analogue device, and as such wasn't even new in 1974 - anyone old enough will remember Sparky's Magic Piano. Autotune is a different device using a different technology, in terms of product development there is no connection between a vocoder and Autotune, one is not the forerunner of the other.
 
Autotune can be used ot make robot vioces and weird pitch shifts and modulations in a vocal but that isn't its main use, it is designed for pitch correction and used properly most people won't even notice when it is being used.

Don't need Autotune for pitch correction, engineers have corrected off-pitch vocals for years in the studio by modulating the speed of the tape.  Madonna was notorious for her off-key studio work, and she required a LOT of tuning help long before Auto-Tune! 

My point is that, as a vocal enhancer, the AutoTune effects of ring modulator, flanger, and delay were employed by prog long before popular music.   Emerson's vocal treatment are essentially similar to AutoTuned effects we hear all the time.  Autotune just bundles them into one package.  It is standard in Apple's "Garage Band" program.  

From Wikipedia:

  "Karn Evil 9" includes vocal credit for Keith Emerson, and is Emerson's only official vocal credit on an ELP record. The only vocals he contributed to the song were those of the voice of the mouse in the Second Impression, which was sped up, and the computer voice in the Third Impression. 

Emerson ran his voice through the Ring Modulator on his Moog Modular to achieve this sound.  

Autotune just jazzes it up.  We did it first, Hollywood just ripped it off.



Back to Top
Dean View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Retired Admin and Amateur Layabout

Joined: May 13 2007
Location: Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 37331
Direct Link To This Post Posted: December 26 2011 at 18:26
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Don't need Autotune for pitch correction, engineers have corrected off-pitch vocals for years in the studio by modulating the speed of the tape.  Madonna was notorious for her off-key studio work, and she required a LOT of tuning help long before Auto-Tune! 
I never said they needed Autotune for pitch correction, I said that was what it was designed for - because modulating tape speed affects the pitch and timing (tempo) whereas Autotune does not - for example with Tammy Winette her singing was so flat they used to record her vocals, pitch correct by altering the tape speed which changed the timing so badly it didn't fit the backing music anymore so they then re-recorded the instrumentation to the new tempo.
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

My point is that, as a vocal enhancer, the AutoTune effects of ring modulator, flanger, and delay were employed by prog long before popular music.  
 
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Emerson's vocal treatment are essentially similar to AutoTuned effects we hear all the time.  
But it's not essentially similar at all - the Moog Vocoder and the Ring Modulator produce different effects to Autotune - and we don't hear Autotune effects "all the time" - Autotune is used a lot but it is rarely used to create robotic effects because it's so cliched, even for Pop.
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Autotune just bundles them into one package.  It is standard in Apple's "Garage Band" program.  
Yes, and no. The technology used in Autotune can also produce those effects because of how the algorhytm works, but it does not work the other way around - a vocoder, ring modulator and/or a flanger cannot be used for pitch-correction - the development of those effects did not lead to Autotune and Autotune was not created to emulate those effects. The main use of Autotune is pitch correction - hence its name.
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

From Wikipedia:

  "Karn Evil 9" includes vocal credit for Keith Emerson, and is Emerson's only official vocal credit on an ELP record. The only vocals he contributed to the song were those of the voice of the mouse in the Second Impression, which was sped up, and the computer voice in the Third Impression. 

Emerson ran his voice through the Ring Modulator on his Moog Modular to achieve this sound.  

Autotune just jazzes it up.  We did it first, Hollywood just ripped it off.

(Bob Moog produced a vocoder long before Karn Evil #9, Walter Carlos used it in '71 so I assumed Emerson had one (or at least used it) - if he used the Moog's ring modulator instead then I assumed wrong - but that's still unrelated to Autotune.)
 
However - Prog didn't do it first - not by a long way - the BBC Radiophonic Workshop used ring modulators back in 1963, Hollywood used them before that in The Forbidden Planet (1956) - ring modulators (double-sideband suppressed carrier modulators) go back to the early days of radio in the 1930s, similarly vocoders were originally designed for telephony in the late 30s - there were several other electronic and electro-mechanical devices used to create robotic singing voices before Prog. Prog was no more the first use of vocoders than it was first use of the electric guitar, the mellotron or the synthesiser.
"You know what uranium is, right?
It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
Including some bad things.
But nobody talks about that."
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 2345>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.01
Copyright ©2001-2014 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.