Forum Home Forum Home > Progressive Music Lounges > Prog Blogs
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - An Illustrated Guide to Prog Rock Instruments
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Topic ClosedAn Illustrated Guide to Prog Rock Instruments

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1234 5>
Author
Message Reverse Sort Order
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 28 2013 at 04:30
Added Pat Metheny's Orchestrion, 8-string basses and fretless guitars, and a couple of minor updates here and there.
Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 21 2013 at 08:39
The sad news of Ray Manzarek's passing away prompted me to update the Rhodes entry to include the Piano Bass famously played by him.
Back to Top
AtomicCrimsonRush View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Symphonic Team

Joined: July 02 2008
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 14256
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 26 2013 at 08:36
Nice job! Keep updating too! 
Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 26 2013 at 08:12
I have updated the Mellotron entry to include the rare models T550, 4-Track and M4000 (the analog version by Streetly) and taken the occasion to throw some light in the mess of the different company names involved in the Mellotron business (Mellotronics, Streetly, Sound Sales, Novatron, the new Swedish Mellotron...).
Back to Top
AtomicCrimsonRush View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Symphonic Team

Joined: July 02 2008
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 14256
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 26 2013 at 07:34
I love the OP and the work that went into it. 

My class is working on the history of instruments right now on an assignment and some of that info would help.

What is the history of the guitar? It began with medieval instruments such as the lute or mandoliin and developed from there. Of equal importance was the Oud and the guitarra moresca. I teach guitar and the students are citing these instruments in their projects. These photos are earliest use of guitar:  



Its all part of the progression of music - and as always its interesting to know where the music comes from.


Edited by AtomicCrimsonRush - March 26 2013 at 07:59
Back to Top
doublerainbow1975 View Drop Down
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie
Avatar

Joined: March 11 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 8
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 26 2013 at 06:06
Bravo - tons of work went into this - love the pre-mellotron info - and all the great early synths.

Cheers!
Back to Top
Anaon View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 01 2005
Location: Kobaïa
Status: Offline
Points: 849
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2013 at 14:56
Well, I understand... It's just that in my quest for sound, I noticed that all these prog guitar players used the Hiwatt, I never noticed that before but I thought then it's kind of a prog amp Wink

Again, great post!!
Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2013 at 14:38
Originally posted by Anaon Anaon wrote:

Awesome thread Clap

If you want to add guitar amps, I think Hiwatt amps could be added as they were used by David Gilmour, Alex Lifeson, Steve Hackett, Martin Barre, Peter Banks, Gary Green and Robert Fripp (and more I suppose...)

Great pics there!
Not sure if I will attempt to write about the amps, I don't know much about it, of course I know the main brands, Hiwatt, Marshall, Laney, Mesa Boogie, Supro, Ampeg, Vox or Hughes & Kettner (mine is one of the later) but I'm not really an expert, I should need some research in order to write something making sense. Maybe some day Tongue

Of course anyone more expert than me is welcome to write another blog 'An Illustrated Guide to Prog common Amps' Tongue
Back to Top
Anaon View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: September 01 2005
Location: Kobaïa
Status: Offline
Points: 849
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2013 at 10:56
Awesome thread Clap

If you want to add guitar amps, I think Hiwatt amps could be added as they were used by David Gilmour, Alex Lifeson, Steve Hackett, Martin Barre, Peter Banks, Gary Green and Robert Fripp (and more I suppose...)











Edited by Anaon - March 24 2013 at 11:02
Back to Top
Larree View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: March 10 2013
Location: Hollywood, CA
Status: Offline
Points: 869
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 23 2013 at 09:36
Wow!  A most amazing post!  Thank you for writing and compiling this great article!
Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 23 2013 at 09:13
Originally posted by paulmarkj paulmarkj wrote:

How about adding guitar effects pedals? They are wonderful beasts and often not understood by non-musicians. 

Alright I have added an entry for effect pedals (not going into many details, the interested reader can search for more by himself).

I have also taken the occasion to add a mention about the curious (albeit admittedly not really relevant for Prog) 10-string configuration of the BC Rich Bich 10 guitars.

BTW I just realised that there are 131 pictures in the article Shocked I never thought it would grow that big.




Edited by Gerinski - March 23 2013 at 09:15
Back to Top
Ajay View Drop Down
Forum Senior Member
Forum Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: February 01 2013
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 221
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 17 2013 at 16:19
Originally posted by paulmarkj paulmarkj wrote:

How about adding guitar effects pedals? They are wonderful beasts and often not understood by non-musicians.

They're often not understood by guitarists either. Wink
Back to Top
paulmarkj View Drop Down
Forum Newbie
Forum Newbie


Joined: July 26 2007
Status: Offline
Points: 6
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 17 2013 at 12:42

Very nice, must have taken a long time but worth the effort.

How about adding guitar effects pedals? They are wonderful beasts and often not understood by non-musicians. 




Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 08 2013 at 16:00
New entry added for the EMS VCS3 and Synthi's.
Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 23 2013 at 05:49
Entry added for MIDI, it's not an instrument but it seemed important enough to deserve some mention.
Back to Top
Dean View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Retired Admin and Amateur Layabout

Joined: May 13 2007
Location: Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 37575
Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 20 2013 at 17:09
Originally posted by Gerinski Gerinski wrote:

Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:


I said "technical/electronic point of view" you said "common lay-man terminology" ... different.
 
From a technical/mechanical point of view there is no difference between a saloon, coupé and a stationwagon
Well, given your usual great explanatory capabilities, I have to say that in this particular case you did not shed any light on my questions (for myself at least I mean) Confused
From a technical/mechanical point of view there is a difference between a petrol-engine car, a diesel, a hybrid, an electric or a fuel cell one, the way the power is produced makes the difference.
I don't usually use analogies because people don't really understand how analogies work... They are supposed to clarify hard to understand explanations - I made a mistake in using one this time. Your analogy is simply repeating the same point you made about tone generation, there was no need for an analogy because I already understood what you were saying.
 
I'll back out now because if you didn't understand what I've said originally and if you keep repeating the same thing you said about how tones are generated then any further explanation by me isn't going to help.


Edited by Dean - February 20 2013 at 17:09
What?
Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 20 2013 at 07:54
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:


I said "technical/electronic point of view" you said "common lay-man terminology" ... different.
 
From a technical/mechanical point of view there is no difference between a saloon, coupé and a stationwagon
Well, given your usual great explanatory capabilities, I have to say that in this particular case you did not shed any light on my questions (for myself at least I mean) Confused
From a technical/mechanical point of view there is a difference between a petrol-engine car, a diesel, a hybrid, an electric or a fuel cell one, the way the power is produced makes the difference.


Edited by Gerinski - February 20 2013 at 11:55
Back to Top
Dean View Drop Down
Special Collaborator
Special Collaborator
Avatar
Retired Admin and Amateur Layabout

Joined: May 13 2007
Location: Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 37575
Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 20 2013 at 07:39
Originally posted by Gerinski Gerinski wrote:

Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:


From a pure technical/electronics point of view there is no difference between an electric organ, an electric piano and a synthesiser, the only difference is in application.
Are you quite sure about that?
I always thought that, at least in common lay-man terminology, the way sounds are generated and/or edited makes such a difference. 
Devices which generate sound by mechanical / acoustic means and then convert them into electric sound signals (typically by electromagnetic pickups, say an electric guitar, a Hammond, a Hohner Clavinet, a Rhodes, a Wurly etc) are not considered synthesizers.
Devices which generate the sound directly from electronic components (vacuum tubes, transistors, oscillators etc) are considered as either 'electronic keyboards' or as 'synthesizers'.
The main difference between 'electronic keyboard' and 'synthesizer' being that in a synth the user has control on the synthesis and signal processing. An instrument with only presets but no possibility for the user to alter them (such as the ARP String Ensemble) would be called an electronic keyboard, while an instrument allowing the user to play with the synthesis and editing of the waveform would be a synth.
Am I very mislead?
I said "technical/electronic point of view" you said "common lay-man terminology" ... different.
 
From a technical/mechanical point of view there is no difference between a saloon, coupé and a stationwagon
What?
Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 20 2013 at 07:03
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:


From a pure technical/electronics point of view there is no difference between an electric organ, an electric piano and a synthesiser, the only difference is in application.
Are you quite sure about that?
I always thought that, at least in common lay-man terminology, the way sounds are generated and/or edited makes such a difference. 
Devices which generate sound by mechanical / acoustic means and then convert them into electric sound signals (typically by electromagnetic pickups, say an electric guitar, a Hammond, a Hohner Clavinet, a Rhodes, a Wurly etc) are not considered synthesizers.
Devices which generate the sound directly from electronic components (vacuum tubes, transistors, oscillators etc) are considered as either 'electronic keyboards' or as 'synthesizers'.
The main difference between 'electronic keyboard' and 'synthesizer' being that in a synth the user has control on the synthesis and signal processing. An instrument with only presets but no possibility for the user to alter them (such as the ARP String Ensemble) would be called an electronic keyboard, while an instrument allowing the user to play with the synthesis and editing of the waveform would be a synth.
Am I very mislead?



Back to Top
Gerinski View Drop Down
Prog Reviewer
Prog Reviewer
Avatar

Joined: February 10 2010
Location: Barcelona Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 4696
Direct Link To This Post Posted: February 20 2013 at 06:42
Added:

- Mellotron Mk V which was missing

- In the entry for Lap Steel Guitar I have added the curious Lapaphone played by John Paul Jones, it was built by Hugh Manson so that should please Chuck (Cstack3) Tongue

A couple of minor updates elsewhere.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1234 5>

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.01
Copyright ©2001-2014 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.117 seconds.

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.