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Was prog actually popular in the 70s??

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timothy leary View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote timothy leary Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2013 at 17:36
^ Because you spent a lot of time in Wyoming ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2013 at 17:57
Originally posted by timothy leary timothy leary wrote:

^ Because you spent a lot of time in Wyoming ?
 
Madison, WI in the late 60's and early 70's, and then Santa Barbara, CA in the 70's and early 80's.
 
I have the badges from the 60's ... frisked by the National Guard in Madison when the Kent State shootings happened, and then later got my head beatup by Daly's cops in Chicago, because Sly and the Family Stone didn't show u for their show -- when the audience got restless!
 
You have no idea ... how so much of that music is important to so many folks!
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, instead of paying for a guru or church or social program!



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote timothy leary Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2013 at 18:07
I have no idea? I don't need badges. If you were at the convention in chicago can you tell me who led the march on the Conrad Hilton?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2013 at 20:58
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Hi,
 

It's just sad to see all this trashing going around ... music was no more, or less, popular NOW, than it was THEN, or vice versa!

 

It was about the same!

 

And if you think that some of these bands, did not sell, or were not, it was because you had your head in the sand, and were living in Podunk, Moon House, or Peeweeneedles in Mars Land.

 

The lack of appreciation or respect for a time and place ... people were not stupid!

 

Half the folks in PA wouldn't have bothered!


What about Texas?? Lol
Ok. It's time. Lets get Fields Of The Nephilim on PA. They rightfully belong here.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2013 at 21:17
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:


Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:


Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:


Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

<div style="margin-left: 1px; margin-top: 1px; margin-right: 1px; margin-bottom: 1px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 1.2; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; "><span ="apple-style-span"="">
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Ermm which is probably why there are no 70s Prog bands from Southern Texas.... and so very few from the USA.
<div style="font-weight: normal; "><div style="font-weight: normal; ">FYI:  Here's a poll I started a while back specifically about little known 70's US prog bands...and no, I don't think any of them are from south Texas Wink<div style="font-weight: normal; ">http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=94116 
<div style="font-weight: normal; "><div style="font-weight: normal; ">QED<div style="font-weight: normal; "> <div style="font-weight: normal; ">Any of those from Southern Texas? (or Texas? or any of the Southern states?)
<div style="font-weight: normal; ">
Actually, 3 of them were from the US South.  Lift was from New Orleans, Babylon from Florida and I'm pretty sure Easter Island was from Kentucky.  As for the others mentioned in the poll, Mirthrandir and Fireballet were from New Jersey, Cathedral from Massachusetts, Netherworld from the SF Bay Area, Pentwater was from Chicago, <font ="apple-style-span"="" color="#ff0000">and I'm pretty sure Starcastle was from Indiana.  Don't know about Shadowfax, Yezda Urfa, or others mentioned in the poll comments like Ethos and Happy the Man.
<div style="font-weight: normal; "><div style="font-weight: normal; ">Still none from Texas Wink</span>

Nein.  Starcastle were from Champaign, Illinois.  I knew Starcastle....Starcastle were friends of mine...and you, sir, are no Starcastle!  LOL

<span ="apple-style-span"="" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba26, 26, 26, 0.296875; -webkit-com-fill-color: rgba175, 192, 227, 0.230469; -webkit-com--color: rgba77, 128, 180, 0.230469; "></span>
<span ="apple-style-span"="" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba26, 26, 26, 0.296875; -webkit-com-fill-color: rgba175, 192, 227, 0.230469; -webkit-com--color: rgba77, 128, 180, 0.230469; ">Illinois, Indiana, what's the difference?  It's a far away state in the Midwest that starts with I LOL</span>

Could you turn down your Nirvana 8-track?  I can't hear you.....

That's not Nirvana, it's Hole Wink

Well, that's all right then!  I am secretly a grunge fan, and a big admirer of Kim Thayill of Soundgarden!  We play the same model six-string electric guitar (Guild S-100).   Some grunge was better than others - I never much liked Nirvana, but Pearl Jam had some good stuff.  I wish the energy of Seattle grunge had collided with prog! 

I'm with you...Nirvana never clicked for me, though I always liked Pearl Jam's "Ten" and the first three Hole albums - though I'm not sure whether they're considered grunge, alternative, or riot grrrrrl LOL


Can't stand the Grunge movement. Yodeling cannot be regarded as singing. Eddie Vedder is a master at that. And then freakin Creed came along and Scott Stap copied Vedder! Lol what a joke.
Ok. It's time. Lets get Fields Of The Nephilim on PA. They rightfully belong here.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2013 at 21:32
somehow I suspect if I'd been in high school when grunge was happening I'd have liked it

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vibrationbaby Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 17 2013 at 23:37
Grunge? OK I'm going down into the prog  mosh pit. Can you imagine being in the mosh pit with ELP playing the Gnome from Pictures. I guess you could mosh pit to Tiger In a Spotlight.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rogerthat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 18 2013 at 00:37
Originally posted by progbethyname progbethyname wrote:

 
Can't stand the Grunge movement. Yodeling cannot be regarded as singing. Eddie Vedder is a master at that. And then freakin Creed came along and Scott Stap copied Vedder! Lol what a joke.

Maybe that holds good for Vedder (I wouldn't know as I find PJ boring) but Chris Cornell and Layne Staley had range and power to put many prog vocalists to shame.  Pearl Jam is hardly all there's to grunge, just the most popular face of it along with Nirvana.  Which doesn't mean anything because Soundgarden and Alice in Chains were also extremely successful bands.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 18 2013 at 10:05
Originally posted by Vibrationbaby Vibrationbaby wrote:

Grunge? OK I'm going down into the prog  mosh pit. Can you imagine being in the mosh pit with ELP playing the Gnome from Pictures. I guess you could mosh pit to Tiger In a Spotlight.
 
I never had a chance to see ELP. But I did have 2 bootlegs, and they were not very good at all, in fact in one they were a bit out of tune, it sounded like for a large bit of the show. I think one of them was from the Forum shows, but I don't remember.
 
I really liked ELP in the earlier days, and after Karn Evil is when I fell out of them.
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, instead of paying for a guru or church or social program!



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dellinger Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 18 2013 at 12:22
Originally posted by Atavachron Atavachron wrote:

somehow I suspect if I'd been in high school when grunge was happening I'd have liked it


I was in highschool when grunge was happening, and I do like it. I'm not the biggest fan of the genre, nor of any particular band, nor do I know much music, but what little I know I enjoy. I enjoy Nirvana, though there's only about 3 or 5 songs I really like a lot from them, and there's a few songs from Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, and a few otheres that I like. Still, I don't know much more than that.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 18 2013 at 13:29
Originally posted by Vibrationbaby Vibrationbaby wrote:

Grunge? OK I'm going down into the prog  mosh pit. Can you imagine being in the mosh pit with ELP playing the Gnome from Pictures. I guess you could mosh pit to Tiger In a Spotlight.

I was at a very impressive Primus gig some years back that had mosh-pits break out on the main floor (there were no chairs or seating).  Young kids, younger than my own, were whirling & crashing into one another with great energy and abandon.  

I enjoyed being on the edges of the pit, we acted like "handlers" so that, when one of the young fellows came crashing into us, we threw him back into the fray!  It was actually quite fun.  

Primus was excellent, Les Claypool is rather amazing on his fretless bass, and guitarist Reid Laurence "Larry" LaLonde was outstanding, evoking Robert Fripp in many passages.  

When Fripp brought his "League of Gentlemen" to Chicago, he insisted upon a large dance floor and some (not nearly all) of the audience participated with pogo-dancing etc.  I was content to sit and watch Fripp play blazing King Crimson-esque guitar solos over new-wave rhythms.  

It's all good.  Enjoy yourself, don't limit yourself in your choices, and take a chance in life.  Check out some type of music that you KNOW you'll hate, you may be surprised.  Peace.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Xonty Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: August 30 2013 at 04:55
It was as rock subgenres go when you look in the early 70s charts and see Thick As A Brick and a few KC albums in the top 10. Also, Tubular Bells has sold however many million and stayed in the Billboard 200 for over 300 weeks. And of course Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon (amongst others like WYWH and The Wall) stayed in the charts for FOURTEEN AND A HALF YEARS! And it's the second biggest selling album of all time at around 45 million. I suppose that's not really evidence of it being popular in the 70s but it shows it's consistently popular throughout the 20th century (and beyond!) Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Bearded Bard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 09:12
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:



As far as Prog and the American South, numerous big prog artists/acts came out of the southern states in the 1970s....Captain Beyond, Dixie Dregs, and Jaco Pastorius all come to mind immediately.  Few guitarists rise to the level of Steve Morse from the Dregs. 


My late friend Michael Hedges was from Oklahoma, which is the state just north of Texas.  The premier American symphonic band, Glass Hammer, hails from Tennessee, which is certainly a Dixie state!  


I cannot think of any Texas prog bands off the top of my head, but they certainly had them, as Texas was the only place with any money during those years because of their oil wealth.  Dallas, Austin and Houston all have very vibrant music scenes, although Texas rock has tended to be very blues-centered.  The father of modern jazz electric guitar, Charlie Christian, hailed from Texas.   More to follow...


 

I have poked the hornet's nest Ouch
 

I'm not questioning the musical heritage of Texas. (Just look to Janice or SRV for that - or the modern legacy that is SXSW). Nor am I saying that no Prog artists hailed from there or any of the Southern states - even if you could list 10 or 20 there would be far far more that were not Prog - for every Starcastle you'd find 100s of other bands that were not inspired by Prog at all. The popularity of any genre can be gauged not just by who buys the albums, but also by the live music scene it supports, ie local Prog bands that sprout up in the area.
The Mars Volta was an American progressive rock band from El Paso, Texas, formed in 2001.
WatchTower was from Austin, Texas. Just sayin'.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 09:48
Originally posted by The Bearded Bard The Bearded Bard wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:



As far as Prog and the American South, numerous big prog artists/acts came out of the southern states in the 1970s....Captain Beyond, Dixie Dregs, and Jaco Pastorius all come to mind immediately.  Few guitarists rise to the level of Steve Morse from the Dregs. 


My late friend Michael Hedges was from Oklahoma, which is the state just north of Texas.  The premier American symphonic band, Glass Hammer, hails from Tennessee, which is certainly a Dixie state!  


I cannot think of any Texas prog bands off the top of my head, but they certainly had them, as Texas was the only place with any money during those years because of their oil wealth.  Dallas, Austin and Houston all have very vibrant music scenes, although Texas rock has tended to be very blues-centered.  The father of modern jazz electric guitar, Charlie Christian, hailed from Texas.   More to follow...


 

I have poked the hornet's nest Ouch
 

I'm not questioning the musical heritage of Texas. (Just look to Janice or SRV for that - or the modern legacy that is SXSW). Nor am I saying that no Prog artists hailed from there or any of the Southern states - even if you could list 10 or 20 there would be far far more that were not Prog - for every Starcastle you'd find 100s of other bands that were not inspired by Prog at all. The popularity of any genre can be gauged not just by who buys the albums, but also by the live music scene it supports, ie local Prog bands that sprout up in the area.
The Mars Volta was an American progressive rock band from El Paso, Texas, formed in 2001.
WatchTower was from Austin, Texas. Just sayin'.
Still a llong way to go before I have to remove my shoes and socks to keep score.




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Bearded Bard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 09:56
That is true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 15:51
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by The Bearded Bard The Bearded Bard wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:



As far as Prog and the American South, numerous big prog artists/acts came out of the southern states in the 1970s....Captain Beyond, Dixie Dregs, and Jaco Pastorius all come to mind immediately.  Few guitarists rise to the level of Steve Morse from the Dregs. 


My late friend Michael Hedges was from Oklahoma, which is the state just north of Texas.  The premier American symphonic band, Glass Hammer, hails from Tennessee, which is certainly a Dixie state!  


I cannot think of any Texas prog bands off the top of my head, but they certainly had them, as Texas was the only place with any money during those years because of their oil wealth.  Dallas, Austin and Houston all have very vibrant music scenes, although Texas rock has tended to be very blues-centered.  The father of modern jazz electric guitar, Charlie Christian, hailed from Texas.   More to follow...


 

I have poked the hornet's nest Ouch
 

I'm not questioning the musical heritage of Texas. (Just look to Janice or SRV for that - or the modern legacy that is SXSW). Nor am I saying that no Prog artists hailed from there or any of the Southern states - even if you could list 10 or 20 there would be far far more that were not Prog - for every Starcastle you'd find 100s of other bands that were not inspired by Prog at all. The popularity of any genre can be gauged not just by who buys the albums, but also by the live music scene it supports, ie local Prog bands that sprout up in the area.
The Mars Volta was an American progressive rock band from El Paso, Texas, formed in 2001.
WatchTower was from Austin, Texas. Just sayin'.
Still a llong way to go before I have to remove my shoes and socks to keep score.

No argument!  However, keep in mind that, in order to be a successful musician, it is necessary to have a fan following.  I'm sure that Texas spawned many great musicians who found the environs stifling and had to move to either East or West coasts in the USA in order to survive.  

Same for Chicago.  We've made huge contributions to blues, jazz and rock, but this has never been a kind town for musicians to develop and ply their craft.  

LA and NYC have vast opportunities including film work, diverse club settings, musical orchestra pits etc.  Texas has barbeque pits, basically.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 17:20
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by The Bearded Bard The Bearded Bard wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:


Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:



As far as Prog and the American South, numerous big prog artists/acts came out of the southern states in the 1970s....Captain Beyond, Dixie Dregs, and Jaco Pastorius all come to mind immediately.  Few guitarists rise to the level of Steve Morse from the Dregs. 


My late friend Michael Hedges was from Oklahoma, which is the state just north of Texas.  The premier American symphonic band, Glass Hammer, hails from Tennessee, which is certainly a Dixie state!  


I cannot think of any Texas prog bands off the top of my head, but they certainly had them, as Texas was the only place with any money during those years because of their oil wealth.  Dallas, Austin and Houston all have very vibrant music scenes, although Texas rock has tended to be very blues-centered.  The father of modern jazz electric guitar, Charlie Christian, hailed from Texas.   More to follow...


 

I have poked the hornet's nest Ouch
 

I'm not questioning the musical heritage of Texas. (Just look to Janice or SRV for that - or the modern legacy that is SXSW). Nor am I saying that no Prog artists hailed from there or any of the Southern states - even if you could list 10 or 20 there would be far far more that were not Prog - for every Starcastle you'd find 100s of other bands that were not inspired by Prog at all. The popularity of any genre can be gauged not just by who buys the albums, but also by the live music scene it supports, ie local Prog bands that sprout up in the area.
The Mars Volta was an American progressive rock band from El Paso, Texas, formed in 2001.
WatchTower was from Austin, Texas. Just sayin'.
Still a llong way to go before I have to remove my shoes and socks to keep score.

No argument!  However, keep in mind that, in order to be a successful musician, it is necessary to have a fan following.  I'm sure that Texas spawned many great musicians who found the environs stifling and had to move to either East or West coasts in the USA in order to survive.  

Same for Chicago.  We've made huge contributions to blues, jazz and rock, but this has never been a kind town for musicians to develop and ply their craft.  

LA and NYC have vast opportunities including film work, diverse club settings, musical orchestra pits etc.  Texas has barbeque pits, basically.  
Some people, (and by that I probably only mean "I"), seem to have lost track of where this particular (and particularly daft) line of tangential meandering came from and what it was initially about. While I normally take perverse pleasure in prolonging pointless arguments to the limit of absurdity I fear this one has veered of the track so far now it is in danger of meeting itself coming the other way. Confused




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote timothy leary Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 17:57
In other words a circle jerk
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote twosteves Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 20:43
For me--bottom line no matter what state a prog band comes from--the vast majority are not to my taste creatively.Disapprove
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: September 02 2013 at 22:39
Originally posted by twosteves twosteves wrote:

For me--bottom line no matter what state a prog band comes from--the vast majority are not to my taste creatively.Disapprove

I'm afraid I have the same opinion of most bands reviewed on PA!  Really good prog is rare indeed, which is why I like this site - it gives me new directions to explore. 

Now please excuse me, I have to put on some of that South Texas symphonic music....




Edited by cstack3 - September 02 2013 at 22:40
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