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Was prog actually popular in the 70s??

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The Dark Elf View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 02 2014 at 20:00
Originally posted by dr wu23 dr wu23 wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by dr wu23 dr wu23 wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Originally posted by dr wu23 dr wu23 wrote:

Someone mentioned above if prog was popular these days and CStack said , a few posts down, that.....
"Prog was extremely popular in Chicago, and still is. " 
 
I think some prog  (the more mainstream bands) was certainly popular back then in many areas of the US ....but extremely?.. I'm not so sure about that. The masses at large listened to radio pop/rock more than prog imo.

Well....what this forum calls "prog" WAS radio pop/rock in the1970's!   Notable examples included Yes' "Roundabout," Flash's "Small Beginnings," and Focus's "Hocus Pocus."   All those songs, and more, were in constant rotation on AM radio.  

I guess you actually had to live through those times to appreciate it.  I'm really glad that I did.
And I agree that some prog that crossed over into the mainstream was popular (usually singles culled from the LP's) but for the most part prog was not what most people listened to.
And I did live through those times.
Cool
Then you didn't live in the Chicago or Detroit areas. Were you living in Indiana at the time? Were you listening to John Cougar Mellencamp or something?

I saw Tull, Yes, Genesis and Floyd while still in high school in the mid-70s. My friends went to see them. Their friends went to see them. The shows were sold out. They were events, not just concerts. People talked about the shows for months.

When you say "prog was not what most people listened to", I believe that is a very subjective statement. I also saw Deep Purple, Sabbath, Robin Trower, David Bowie and Alice Cooper, and "most people" didn't listen to them either in the strictest sense of Fleetwood Mac or The Carpenters or Elton John or KISS or whatever pop band sold the most albums. Yet each of the bands I referred to had gold or platinum albums in that period and each received extensive airplay. 

And you'd get your ass kicked playing a Carpenter's Album where I lived.Wink



Lived just south of Chicago and still live in the same general area in northwest Indiana  Saw Mellencamp at IU for a $2.00 cover charge  when he was still Cougar and was just a local bar act. Never was a big fan  when he became somebody.
Saw the same bands you did and a few more...and they were generally sold out but that leaves a lot of people who didn't attend those shows.
A lot of 'stoners' and long hairs (myself included) listened to prog in the old days but the straights usually did not and many of the people I knew did not listen to what we consider prog today but preferred classic rock and pop rock, etc.
Never said some 'prog bands' weren't popular with a certain crowd but they weren't as popular as the mainstream bands.
 

Just to dredge up the dead horse from the factory glue pit, I stumbled upon some relevant info (as I usually do, when looking for something completely different) in the book Rocking the Classics: English Progressive Rock and the Counterculture. Earlier, I referenced the Detroit rock station WWWW, and lo and behold! the book mentions the station and the ongoing popularity of prog in the Midwest, even in the later 70s:

Quote For instance, a poll administered in Detroit as late as 1978 by WWWW, then a major rock station, asked listeners to identify their favorite songs, from which the station compiled a list of the top 106 (WWWW was 106 FM; the 106 songs were then played on July 4, 1978). ELP placed entries at positions 20, 36 and 53, Yes at 9 and 33, Pink Floyd at 21 and 35, the Moody Blues at 12 and 28 and Jethro Tull at 13 and 101. It is interesting to note that these five bands totaled nine of the top 50 positions, a not unimpressive number. It is also significant that Led Zeppelin's two most overtly progressive epics "Stairway to Heaven" and "Kashmir", placed at at 1 and 5, respectively.

I do question the author as to his claim that "Stairway to Heaven" was Zeppelin's "most overtly progressive epic", but I get the general idea. In addition, although I do not recall the 106 song list in detail, I do remember Traffic's "Low Spark of High Heeled Boys" (which is prog in my book) always ran neck and neck with "Stairway to Heaven" for the top song spot (it was a yearly thing on the 4th of July), and Who songs from Tommy and Quadrophenia (two of the proggiest non-prog albums in creation) were also on the list. Again, this is in 1978, when punk supposedly reigned for its six month stint. Wink


Please pay a visit to my blog...The Dark Elf File...a slighty skewed journal of music reviews, literary comment, fan-fiction and interminable essays.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bhikkhu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 02 2014 at 20:49
^^Must be something about Michigan. WLAV in Grand Rapids regularly played Gabriel era Genesis, Tull, Rush, Yes ELP, etc. into the '80s
a.k.a. H.T.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Stool Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 03 2014 at 05:22
Has the original question been satisfactorily answered yet?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BaldFriede Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 03 2014 at 07:18
I dimly remember a German radio program called  "Pro Pop Music Shop" on WDR 2, a German radio channel. The moderator was a man named Winfrid Trenkler (strange how that name remains in my mind). At some point it was renamed to "Rock In". My brother used to listen to it in the 70s ( he is ten years older than I am). It had a chart voted for by the listeners, and there were almost exclusively prog and prog-related artists in the top ten of this chart. Genesis, Pink Floyd, Wishbone Ash, Deep Purple, Uriah Heep, Santana and so on. So I guess it was quite popular in Germany back then.


Edited by BaldFriede - March 03 2014 at 08:39

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 03 2014 at 08:22
Originally posted by bhikkhu bhikkhu wrote:

^^Must be something about Michigan. WLAV in Grand Rapids regularly played Gabriel era Genesis, Tull, Rush, Yes ELP, etc. into the '80s
 
Actually so did other places.
 
In Santa Barbara, just to give you an idea of the competitive nature of things, my roomie played Genesis shamelessly, and even played the whole albums in its entirety, culminating with TLLDOB in its entirety, TWICE, back to back, because of demands in the phone, I imagine. The other big FM station that competed,  NEVER played a single piece, until AFTER the pop Genesis became a hit!
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TODDLER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 11:00
Like I stated before...when you walk into a record store and posters of ELP are hanging on the wall, then what does that tell you? How does that register with you? Unlike 2014 where many people have no reality concept of that nor a vision, using their imagination and so on..The history of Prog is documented and released on dvd...but not broadcasted through television coverage like the mainstream sellers often are. It's difficult for many people to imagine Prog was once very huge and based on the fact that they didn't experience that generation first hand.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TODDLER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 11:21
In the early 70's..a massive amount of teenagers on the American east coast who were skilled musicians were forming Prog cover bands. Hundreds of musicians all over the road were playing Prog. Philadelphia, P.A., N.Y., N.J., Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, come to mind..but it was very huge in the South. It was totally insane to witness that amount of musicians playing prog. They were performing covers of Prog and writing their own music to work their way into the circuit for original acts. That was the basic method of accomplishment. It was possible to make over 500 hundred dollars a week and eventually a thousand. You could invest in your career along the way and still land a record contract and promotion. It was a vast Prog scene that inspired skilled musicians on the east coast to endlessly thrive on mastering all aspects of it. This went on for years until the industry dropped the Prog bands a level down to theatre bookings. Eventually by the early 80's..most Prog had the popularity of Univers Zero and everything remained underground from that point on with the exception of what is attributed to the Prog fests assembled in recent years. However..I find Prog bands performing at picnics to be unjust. Why not gamble and at least attempt to support Prog making life easier for people to digest it. Thousands were dropped into Prog years ago and the idea presents itself today as being farce and the past has no value because of that alone. No one with money at hand will gamble on a re-birth of it. Maybe a wealthy society will.

Edited by TODDLER - March 05 2014 at 11:33
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TODDLER Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 11:49
In the 70's I was traveling constantly... playing 6 nighters and booked 6 months ahead. I carried schedule cards in my gig bag. All bands that played Prog were booked 6 nights a week, from state to state, staying at Holiday Inns, and making a very good living off Prog. Why would that type of  booking exist? We weren't The Monkees..but people everywhere were eating it up. If your band played Jethro Tull...the venue would be packed. Everyone was interested in watching a guy twirl his flute and dance around like a madman on stage. Everyone was thinking about Ian Anderson as they drank their beer. You wouldn't believe the impact it had on the youth. All the profit made from that ...you could buy roads and name them after yourself? Where was all that money going? 2 Prog cover bands would perform in a huge club, alternating sets ...while the venue is so packed..you can't leave the stage and find the dressing room without tripping on someone. If you spoke with musicians who traveled the road during the Prog craze of the 70's...they would surely give you a clear idea on just how popular Prog was in the 70's. The road speaks for itself 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StaaViinsZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 18:41
No.
And in the 80's, there was no Hair Metal.
In the seventies, There was no Hard Rock.
In the sixties, there was no Rock N' Roll.
In the fifties, there was no Jazz.
In the fourties, there was no Swing (or was that fifties?)
In the 30s, whatever there was then, that was even slightly rockin', it didn't happen.
DON'T YOU GET IT?!
THE ONLY MUSIC THAT EVER EXISTED WAS DAVID AND THE HARP!!
EVER!!


My other drastic opinion would be that no music existed before 1980, considering the large quantity of lame hard rock bands in the 70s, and the lack thereof of any music of the "Heavy" nature before 1970, however, that opinion is one that gets you the WRONG PLACES in a forum, especially a Prog Forum, so that was not the opinion I elected to joking state, mostly because it's surprisingly accurate, and just may get mistaken for my actual attitude.

These two would be my drastic opinions.
My actual opinion?
Well, lets just say before 1980, it gets pretty sparse in the territory of me liking it.
However, that, of course, does not mean music created before 1980 is not "Real", but it does mean that it is UNBEARABLE and probably should be eradicated from the earth. At least, to me Wink

In retrospect: Close to the Edge would be the sole exception that comes to mind for my "1980" rule of thumb, coming in at a measly 1972!
I mean, it is Prog and all, but that doesn't mean it can't still be good!
However, lets face it, in all honestly, even Judas Priest's 1978 Hell Bent For Leather was, at times, pretty lame.
I mean, sure, maybe it's actually pretty good, if you ignore the fact that "Delivering The Goods" is the best track, and that it seems like a early, lamer version of "Breaking the Law", with an annoying sexual theme, but lets face it, anything that came out before 1980 just didn't really have the quality standards that things did by at least 1984.

Consider the quantities of awesome things coming out by 1985!
Stryper's "Soldiers Under Command" (1985), Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force's "Marching Out" (1985), even Tony Carey's "Some Tough City" (1984), even if it was a little on the softer side.
Try to think of that many awesome albums before 1980.
For me, it's impossible.
As much as I want to say they aren't there, I'm sure there are some ultra-awesome Prog masterpieces, at least in some opinions, that came out before 1980.

But I guess what I'm saying is, for me, right now, thinking of anything all that great before 1980 (before 1981, really), is impossible.

Feel free to slam me with a bucketload of Prog albums that go over my head.

StaaVi



Edited by StaaViinsZ - March 05 2014 at 18:59
"Let us scream like Tom Mallicoat, and whisper like Geoff Tate, for the difference between the two is nigh."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 18:44
lol.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 19:04
Wow.......
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 19:21
Originally posted by StaaViinsZ StaaViinsZ wrote:

But I guess what I'm saying is, for me, right now, thinking of anything all that great before 1980 (before 1981, really), is impossible.

Feel free to slam me with a bucketload of Prog albums that go over my head.

StaaVi


Forget prog;  I give you Seals & Crofts, my misled friend.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Padraic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 20:02
Originally posted by StaaViinsZ StaaViinsZ wrote:

No.
And in the 80's, there was no Hair Metal.
In the seventies, There was no Hard Rock.
In the sixties, there was no Rock N' Roll.
In the fifties, there was no Jazz.
In the fourties, there was no Swing (or was that fifties?)
In the 30s, whatever there was then, that was even slightly rockin', it didn't happen.
DON'T YOU GET IT?!
THE ONLY MUSIC THAT EVER EXISTED WAS DAVID AND THE HARP!!
EVER!!


My other drastic opinion would be that no music existed before 1980, considering the large quantity of lame hard rock bands in the 70s, and the lack thereof of any music of the "Heavy" nature before 1970, however, that opinion is one that gets you the WRONG PLACES in a forum, especially a Prog Forum, so that was not the opinion I elected to joking state, mostly because it's surprisingly accurate, and just may get mistaken for my actual attitude.

These two would be my drastic opinions.
My actual opinion?
Well, lets just say before 1980, it gets pretty sparse in the territory of me liking it.
However, that, of course, does not mean music created before 1980 is not "Real", but it does mean that it is UNBEARABLE and probably should be eradicated from the earth. At least, to me Wink

In retrospect: Close to the Edge would be the sole exception that comes to mind for my "1980" rule of thumb, coming in at a measly 1972!
I mean, it is Prog and all, but that doesn't mean it can't still be good!
However, lets face it, in all honestly, even Judas Priest's 1978 Hell Bent For Leather was, at times, pretty lame.
I mean, sure, maybe it's actually pretty good, if you ignore the fact that "Delivering The Goods" is the best track, and that it seems like a early, lamer version of "Breaking the Law", with an annoying sexual theme, but lets face it, anything that came out before 1980 just didn't really have the quality standards that things did by at least 1984.

Consider the quantities of awesome things coming out by 1985!
Stryper's "Soldiers Under Command" (1985), Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force's "Marching Out" (1985), even Tony Carey's "Some Tough City" (1984), even if it was a little on the softer side.
Try to think of that many awesome albums before 1980.
For me, it's impossible.
As much as I want to say they aren't there, I'm sure there are some ultra-awesome Prog masterpieces, at least in some opinions, that came out before 1980.

But I guess what I'm saying is, for me, right now, thinking of anything all that great before 1980 (before 1981, really), is impossible.

Feel free to slam me with a bucketload of Prog albums that go over my head.

StaaVi



This post is a piping hot cup of win.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2014 at 20:35
Originally posted by StaaViinsZ StaaViinsZ wrote:


Feel free to slam me with a bucketload of Prog albums that go over my head.

No sense in doing  that. You are amusing just the way you are.
Please pay a visit to my blog...The Dark Elf File...a slighty skewed journal of music reviews, literary comment, fan-fiction and interminable essays.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StaaViinsZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2014 at 00:10
Originally posted by Padraic Padraic wrote:

This post is a piping hot cup of win.

Excuse my cluelessness, but what does that mean exactly?

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

No sense in doing  that. You are amusing just the way you are.

And that comment right there shows that this forum is composed of people over 40.
Any other forum would've whopped me over the head with joyous disdain.
This forum? Wow, the people are so... nice here.




Edited by StaaViinsZ - March 06 2014 at 00:11
"Let us scream like Tom Mallicoat, and whisper like Geoff Tate, for the difference between the two is nigh."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2014 at 00:19
Originally posted by StaaViinsZ StaaViinsZ wrote:

Originally posted by Padraic Padraic wrote:

This post is a piping hot cup of win.

Excuse my cluelessness, but what does that mean exactly?


It means he likes it (and might be a little turned on).

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cstack3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2014 at 00:39
Originally posted by fudgenuts64 fudgenuts64 wrote:

Hi, I'm curious to know whether the most well known prog had some popularity at it's peak. Like, was stuff like Close to the Edge or Foxtrot commonly known during that time or just a mere niche? This was before my time so I'm very curious to know exactly what prog significance was during it's peak.  

The song "Roundabout" was in constant rotation on AM radio in Chicago....it was edited down to a mere 3:28 length!  

This song alone launched Yes in the Midwestern US market....their single of "America" was another big pop music hit.  

The fans followed along for CTTE with no problem. 

Check this video out! 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StaaViinsZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2014 at 00:47
Quote The song "Roundabout" was in constant rotation on AM radio in Chicago....it was edited down to a mere 3:28 length!


As far as editing songs down that are long-- anybody seen the video version of Gamma Ray's Rebellion In Dreamland??

Wow-- everything that made the original 9:00 minute epic great is all dumbed down into a simple 3 &1/2 minute or so rehash. That said, the video is pretty cool though.



Edited by StaaViinsZ - March 06 2014 at 00:52
"Let us scream like Tom Mallicoat, and whisper like Geoff Tate, for the difference between the two is nigh."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2014 at 02:52
Ermm let's see.... Gamma Ray are not Prog and never will be, and they certainly were not popular in the 70s.


lol.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote StaaViinsZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 06 2014 at 04:08
Quote let's see.... Gamma Ray are not Prog and never will be, and they certainly were not popular in the 70s.


lol.


NOT... PROG...???

Well, you have to admit, a 9 minute song might be just a little SEMI-PROGRESSIVE FOR METAL...

But no, they weren't popular in the 70s.

Mibad for off-topic post, milady, that is, if you are a lady, it's weird the avatars some people have sometimes...

I suppose, though, lets face it, this thread is Prog, 70s.
If you don't like 70s, and are gonna talk about things that are barely in the "semi-questionable" Prog territory, then

WHAT ARE YOU DOING ON THIS THREAD!?!?

Can I get a... A-OKAY WITH ME?



Edited by StaaViinsZ - March 06 2014 at 04:10
"Let us scream like Tom Mallicoat, and whisper like Geoff Tate, for the difference between the two is nigh."
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