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Is your Prog Collection too big?

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Tapfret View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tapfret Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 02 2013 at 14:48
Originally posted by Surrealist Surrealist wrote:

Music edited on a computer has zero interest to me.  I like to feel the music in a more human way.. original.. not homogenized with preconceived plugins, digital filters and quantitizing of rhythm tracks.  The compressed digital formats are even worse to my ears.  CD's are horrible.. MP3's even worse. 

My collection is 100% vinyl.  I listen to every record I own from time to time.  My search for music is much more focused upon finding better copies or better pressings of the great stuff the real prog legends left behind for us to discover and enjoy. 

The golden age was very prolific, and there is a lifetime of stuff to listen too if you know what to look for and where to find it.

Most of the new prog I hear is either just rehashing of the old stuff, ideas and concepts.. or over produced computer manipulated garbage that dies on my ears faster than I can switch to a different recording.

I don't want to have to question the honesty of a recording.  Pre digital age I don't have too. 
Most all the modern vinyl releases have been simply dumped from Pro Tools onto the vinyl format.  That makes about as much sense as serving a frozen pizza at a 5 star restaurant. 

I prefer the age of quality over the age of convenience.  GPS to me stands for too lazy to learn celestial navigation and topography. 

Generation lazy followed by generation head down.



If you are not listening to a live performance the experience is completely inorganic and you should hang your head in shame as you feign enjoyment of a disingenuous reproduction. All recording is artistically impotent compared to the live experience. Its like auditory masturbation and makes me want to puke.

AND I'LL BE DAMNED IF THEY ARE GOING TO TAKE MY LICENSE AWAY....NOW GET OFF MY LAWN! 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Floyd Steely Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 02 2013 at 15:18
^^ *SNORT*
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sleeper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 02 2013 at 16:54
Originally posted by Tapfret Tapfret wrote:

Originally posted by Surrealist Surrealist wrote:

Music edited on a computer has zero interest to me.  I like to feel the music in a more human way.. original.. not homogenized with preconceived plugins, digital filters and quantitizing of rhythm tracks.  The compressed digital formats are even worse to my ears.  CD's are horrible.. MP3's even worse. 

My collection is 100% vinyl.  I listen to every record I own from time to time.  My search for music is much more focused upon finding better copies or better pressings of the great stuff the real prog legends left behind for us to discover and enjoy. 

The golden age was very prolific, and there is a lifetime of stuff to listen too if you know what to look for and where to find it.

Most of the new prog I hear is either just rehashing of the old stuff, ideas and concepts.. or over produced computer manipulated garbage that dies on my ears faster than I can switch to a different recording.

I don't want to have to question the honesty of a recording.  Pre digital age I don't have too. 
Most all the modern vinyl releases have been simply dumped from Pro Tools onto the vinyl format.  That makes about as much sense as serving a frozen pizza at a 5 star restaurant. 

I prefer the age of quality over the age of convenience.  GPS to me stands for too lazy to learn celestial navigation and topography. 

Generation lazy followed by generation head down.



If you are not listening to a live performance the experience is completely inorganic and you should hang your head in shame as you feign enjoyment of a disingenuous reproduction. All recording is artistically impotent compared to the live experience. Its like auditory masturbation and makes me want to puke.

AND I'LL BE DAMNED IF THEY ARE GOING TO TAKE MY LICENSE AWAY....NOW GET OFF MY LAWN! 

Now THAT was a good post.

In answer to the main question, no, not even close. There's so much music from the last 45 years out there that I want to get a hold of it's unreal, and thats before you take into account the new music being released. I've found that no matter how good a band or album is, if you keep listening to the same things over and over again you run the risk of burning out on them. There is always something good out there that I/you've yet to come across and whether it's better or not that my old favorites is beside the point as long as I can get some kind of enjoyment from it. New worlds to discover and all that.   
Spending more than I should on Prog since 2005

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zumacraig Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 02 2013 at 17:08
Originally posted by samdelrussi samdelrussi wrote:

In my case and I suspect with many other people as well, there is a certain aspect of it which loosely falls into the "addiction" category. If I am passionate about something, in this case Progressive Music, then I am compelled to explore it to the maximum degree possible and as with any art form or any other worthwhile human endeavor the wealth of great music yet to come is most likely endless so although I too feel the heat from years of collecting and a music library approaching 5000 albums, I just can't stop. What if I miss something? Digital music has proven to be a lifesaver as far as space concerns go and although I was once an avid audiophile who can no longer afford the luxury, I have found that with a good set of external speakers and an equalizer properly adjusted one can more or less come up with sound that's pretty decent though far from perfection. I'd much rather be able to say that I've seen a halfway decent reproduction of the Mona Lisa than to never have seen it at all. I do however see the other side of the "Quality" argument as well.

the problem with addiction is that one is always trying to recapture that first, ultimate high.  unfortunately, those moments are few and far between.  what i'd give to hear Close to the Edge for the first time again.Big smile


Edited by zumacraig - June 02 2013 at 22:04
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote presdoug Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 02 2013 at 17:27
^My first listening to Triumvirat's Illusions On A Double Dimple in the spring of 1985 was an unforgettable, and transcendental experience for me.
"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 01:25
I enjoy buying new CD's so its a completely irrelevant question to me. Also I live on my own in a big house so I have more than enough storage space. BTW I never really got into vinyl but I did like cassettes. I don't mind MP3's at all. My hi fi copes extremely well with this format.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Slartibartfast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 04:18
I always have a great chuckle at vinyl snobbery.  I grew up in the vinyl and cassette age. 8 tracks and reel to reels were out there but fading fast when I became a prog nut.  I'd always copy my albums to cassette to preserve the vinyl and get the portability.  Vinyl scratches and nothing takes away from the music experience like a record scratch.  I also used dbx for the cassettes, which would make a copy that sounded as good as the LP, unlike dullby.  In addition to recording whole albums, I'd also make assortment tapes.

When CDs came out they were a godsend, even despite the fact that in the early days they'd often just put the LP master on the CD and not master for the CD format, a big no no.  On a funny note, my first CD version of Marscape was actually transferred to CD by playing an LP, you can hear the needle noise at the quiet parts.

I eventually quit buying LPs and making cassettes.  I lost all my cassettes and a bunch of LPs I was going to sell in the flood of 2009.  I still have two boom boxes that can play cassettes but nothing to play in them.

Along comes the age of the MP3 or digital music files.  I was reluctant to embrace it at first.  I got my first player because it would be a great way to take my music collection with me on vacations.  I used to spend inordinate amounts of time figuring out what CDs to load into my carrying case.  Having my entire collection accessible on computer and on a portable player (currently use a Zune) is a wonderful thing.  And I can still sit down and listen to the CD if I want to enjoy the music that way.  So there, vinyl snobs.

I should also add that something else is bringing back the you have to sit down and listen or watch and listen and that is the DVD and surround sound.   I have built up a good collection of live stuff and had already built up a good VHS collection, which I have transferred most of to DVD.

On a final note anyone remember quad back in the '70's?

For those that care my collection is holding steady for a while at
1522 CDs (discs and/or titles if box sets have discs in separate jewel cases I give each disc a number)
175 DVDs and or VHS copied to DVD
172 Keeper LPs
Big smile


Edited by Slartibartfast - June 03 2013 at 04:19
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Blacksword Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 04:40
I don't know how many prog rock albums I have. Including vinyl, CD and MP3 there's hundreds.

I've stopped buying CD's for now, until I can buy a bigger house!!

To be honest, I've got most of the classic stuff I want, and i'm feeling generally uninspired to go and discover new bands. I don't know why, it's just how I am right now. Most music I hear bores me. Hopefully, just a phase.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote King Manuel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 05:53

I grew up on vinyl and cassettes and then moved into the age of CDs, which is when I stopped buying LPs. I didnīt hop on the MP3 train immediately when it started out, but at some stage gave in, mainly for travelling purposes. Due to moving countries and continents I sold  or gave away all my LPs, however kept the CDs (ca. 500).

Now living at the southern tip of Africa I stopped buying CDs altogether and resorted to downloading new releases via itunes, band camp, etc..  As you will not find for example the lastest Spockīs Beard or Phideaux in a record store down here and ordering the disc from overseas is very expensive and will most likely get “lost” in the South African postal system, MP3 kind of remains my only way of getting my hands on Prog.

So over the last years my purchases have been predominately digital downloads, so the issue of space is not really a problem for me. I have a 160 GB iPod which hosts all my music and still has some free space left. The problem is just the quantity of music and the time left in a 24 hour day after work and family time. Why should I buy more and more and more if I even haven’t managed to listen to some of my favourite albums in over a year?

I also think the number of new Prog Bands releasing albums have just exploded over the years (something also mentioned by Andy Tillison from The Tangent in a different context). Oh, by the way, The Tanget, I actually like them but when last did I listen to them?

Just looking at the most popular artist over the last 24 hours on PA confronts me with a multitude of unknown bands: Willowglass? Dynamo Bliss? Unreal City? Nemrud? The Inner Road? Sound of Contact? Never heard of all those bands. I feel my “musical” life will not be poorer if I donīt go out and explore them and get their stuff. I rather sit down and dust off my ELP CDs which I probably haven’t touched in two years and for a change give them a spin again.

I have also over the last years developed a more critical stance against consumerism. This whole buy, buy, buy rat race is getting to me. As I donīt feel compelled to constantly go out and buy the newest phone, the newest car, the newest cloths, etc to achieve happiness, I feel I donīt need more and more music.



Edited by King Manuel - June 03 2013 at 05:54
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote friso Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 08:10
Discovering the virtues of buddhist practice I've almost stopped buying new music. My collecton decreased in size and I try only to keep the things I think of as very good and the records I play much (which are two different things!). No band is holy, no discography should be complete. The rest I give away to friends who want to listen to it way more often then I do. I have given away at least four times as much records as a bought last year.

The whole concept of 'owning' (re-ensuring yourself time and time again something outside yourself belongs to something inside of you) has become a bit strange for me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 08:14
^I feel much the same about almost everything - apart for my music that isEmbarrassed
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TheGazzardian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 08:31
^ I can also somewhat relate, whenever I see someone with a moving truck and I compare the size of the person to the amount of stuff they are pulling behind them, it always feels weird to me.

But I still keep buying music. My tastes have moved beyond the just-prog days. I tend to go through phases, where I just want to listen to music I have, until I feel exploratory and just binge on trying new stuff. I recently went through a binge where I listened to couple hundred new albums / artists between grooveshark / noisetrade / daytrotter, which converted to about 50 CD purchases (plus about 50 more from record store day time sales). Now I am feeling 'maxed out' and will probably only buy a handful of albums in the next few months. 

I don't make much effort to make 'owning' CDs meaningful; that is to say, I don't ensure that I listen to them all. My tastes move and flit between different ideas and I don't always like now what I liked before. When I first started collecting music I was huge into Canadian rock like Tom Cochrane, 54-40, Spirit of the West, and Odds, but now I find I almost never want to listen to these guys, so I don't. But every once in a while, the itch will come to listen to something I haven't listened to in years ... and it sounds brand new. By only listening to what I want when I want, I make my music collection serve me, instead of feeling like it owns me. It allows me to have a ton of CDs without really caring that maybe I haven't listened to ELP in 3 years or etc...

I find the biggest problem with owning as many CDs as I do (I think somewhere between 1200 and 1300 now) is finding shelf space for them. A bunch have ended up in the closet because I ran out of space on my 'display' shelves (which is a ridiculous idea in the first place, because nobody I know has ever browsed my collection but me XD)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote King Manuel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 09:03
Originally posted by TheGazzardian TheGazzardian wrote:

A bunch have ended up in the closet because I ran out of space on my 'display' shelves (which is a ridiculous idea in the first place, because nobody I know has ever browsed my collection but me XD)
LOLLOLLOL
 
 .... but I enjoy it when some vistitor once in a while brouses through my "display shelves" and comments: "Strange, I donīt know any of those bands"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mormegil Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 10:20
You can never have too much prog. So many sounds, so many moods. Heaven!
(Honey, where'd we store that other PODS trailer??)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zumacraig Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 12:17
Originally posted by King Manuel King Manuel wrote:

I grew up on vinyl and cassettes and then moved into the age of CDs, which is when I stopped buying LPs. I didnīt hop on the MP3 train immediately when it started out, but at some stage gave in, mainly for travelling purposes. Due to moving countries and continents I sold  or gave away all my LPs, however kept the CDs (ca. 500).

Now living at the southern tip of Africa I stopped buying CDs altogether and resorted to downloading new releases via itunes, band camp, etc..  As you will not find for example the lastest Spockīs Beard or Phideaux in a record store down here and ordering the disc from overseas is very expensive and will most likely get “lost” in the South African postal system, MP3 kind of remains my only way of getting my hands on Prog.

So over the last years my purchases have been predominately digital downloads, so the issue of space is not really a problem for me. I have a 160 GB iPod which hosts all my music and still has some free space left. The problem is just the quantity of music and the time left in a 24 hour day after work and family time. Why should I buy more and more and more if I even haven’t managed to listen to some of my favourite albums in over a year?

I also think the number of new Prog Bands releasing albums have just exploded over the years (something also mentioned by Andy Tillison from The Tangent in a different context). Oh, by the way, The Tanget, I actually like them but when last did I listen to them?

Just looking at the most popular artist over the last 24 hours on PA confronts me with a multitude of unknown bands: Willowglass? Dynamo Bliss? Unreal City? Nemrud? The Inner Road? Sound of Contact? Never heard of all those bands. I feel my “musical” life will not be poorer if I donīt go out and explore them and get their stuff. I rather sit down and dust off my ELP CDs which I probably haven’t touched in two years and for a change give them a spin again.

I have also over the last years developed a more critical stance against consumerism. This whole buy, buy, buy rat race is getting to me. As I donīt feel compelled to constantly go out and buy the newest phone, the newest car, the newest cloths, etc to achieve happiness, I feel I donīt need more and more music.


Excellent point about consumerism.  I strive for simple minimalism, but have always seen music as art and not a product.  Over the last few years, I've changed my mind on this.  The reality for me is that most of the bands I like only create a few albums worth of good music...at least to my ears.  The only artist that I've enjoyed 99% of his out put is Pat Metheny.  

One example of this saturation of product in prog is Roine Stolt.  He has put out a few modern day masterpieces (Stardust We Are, Garden of Dreams), but man the dude releases every damn thing he thinks of and even has hours left on the cutting room floor.  There's tons of music he's put out solo, Transatlantic, Kaipa, Agents of Mercy, 3rd World Electric, Flower Kings.  For a while I just assumed I was going to be a completist of all things Flower Kings.  Alas, it's impossible and now I really don't care.  I really liked their last album, but that's enough for now. 

I think the same could be true of all the big prog artists out there.  Aside from their main bands, they have lots of projects that are less than stellar most of the time.  Steven Wilson, Jon Anderson, Rick Wakeman, Neal Morse.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zumacraig Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 12:22
Originally posted by friso friso wrote:

Discovering the virtues of buddhist practice I've almost stopped buying new music. My collecton decreased in size and I try only to keep the things I think of as very good and the records I play much (which are two different things!). No band is holy, no discography should be complete. The rest I give away to friends who want to listen to it way more often then I do. I have given away at least four times as much records as a bought last year.

The whole concept of 'owning' (re-ensuring yourself time and time again something outside yourself belongs to something inside of you) has become a bit strange for me.

Ha, I'm a buddhist too (for all intents and purposes)!  I see exactly where you're coming from.  I've gone from hundreds of CDs to about 50.  I don't even like keeping tons of music on my computer either.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HolyMoly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 12:23
Originally posted by King Manuel King Manuel wrote:

Originally posted by TheGazzardian TheGazzardian wrote:

A bunch have ended up in the closet because I ran out of space on my 'display' shelves (which is a ridiculous idea in the first place, because nobody I know has ever browsed my collection but me XD)
LOLLOLLOL
 
 .... but I enjoy it when some vistitor once in a while brouses through my "display shelves" and comments: "Strange, I donīt know any of those bands"
I live for that kind of thing. LOL

My dad comes to visit fairly often (he lives here in Atlanta too), and he always browses through my collection for something to borrow, or sometimes I'll give him something I think he'd like.  It's inside a walk-in closet with concrete walls in the basement, so it's not the most inviting place in the house, but I think that makes it that much more mysterious.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HolyMoly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 12:28
Originally posted by Slartibartfast Slartibartfast wrote:

  I lost all my cassettes and a bunch of LPs I was going to sell in the flood of 2009.
That flood pretty much did our basement in - luckily, though, all my stereo equipment and music collection was on the far side of the basement away from the flooding part, so none of my music got damaged.  It did cost an arm and a leg to clean up, as well as waterproof the basement against future floods.  Happily, no further problems since then.


Edited by HolyMoly - June 03 2013 at 12:29
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gerinski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 13:46
Originally posted by King Manuel King Manuel wrote:


 .... but I enjoy it when some visitor once in a while brouses through my "display shelves" and comments: "Strange, I donīt know any of those bands"
I don't know if 'enjoy' is the word but I completely follow you, when people come to my place they at first are surprised by how many CDs I have, then they start scrolling around them and their faces get weird, like thinking 'god, all those CDs and I don't know any of them, what is this guy up to? Confused'
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote johnobvious Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: June 03 2013 at 14:43
Short answer is yes, too much music.  The dilemma lies in the good and bad in your collection. Not enough time to listen to the good stuff and too much self flogging over the bad stuff that you spent good money on and rarely listen to.

If someone could coordinate a huge prog swap meet where all us proggers could get together in one place with all our music and we could trade, then it's problem solved. Someone get on that. Let's shoot for Vegas in the fall.
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