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Favorite Soundtracks

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BrufordFreak View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote BrufordFreak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Favorite Soundtracks
    Posted: July 26 2013 at 21:05

Conor Fynes’ recent review of Vangelis’ amazing Blade Runner soundtrack got me thinking of a great thread/discussion idea (though it's probably already been done): 

Top 10 Movie Soundtracks of Original Music Composed by A Single Composer

 My Ten:

1. Blade Runner - Vangelis

2. Thief - Tangerine Dream

3. Last Samurai - Hans Zimmer

4. Paris, Texas - Ry Kooder

5. Last Temptation of Christ – Peter Gabriel

6. Rabbit-Proof Fence--Peter Gabriel

7. Pi – Clint Mansell

8. The Fountain – Clint Mansell

9. Star Wars – John Williams

10. Rocky – Bill Conti

Drew Fisher, Second Cloud on the Left Farm
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hellogoodbye View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote hellogoodbye Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 26 2013 at 21:37
None are my favorite, but here I ll go for Blade Runner. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote jude111 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 26 2013 at 23:07


I'll add more as I think about it. But for now:

Blade Runner - I saw this in the movie theater at 14 (tells you how old I am). I was already a huge Floyd fan, and I was absolutely convinced that the music was by Floyd. When the credits rolled around and it said Vangelis (whom I had never heard of), I figured it was an alias. (I'm still surprised that others can't hear how Floydian the music is.) Spielberg's E.T. came out the same year; everyone in my family was in tears after the film but me. I hated it. (Don't tell my wife.) Blade Runner was the great sci-fi film of that year and any year, imo.

Diva
- French film from 1981, scored by Vladimir Cosma. Some of it might be a bit cheesy, but I love even those. Great moody electronic music. Great film too.

Stalker - Another sci-fi film, this time by Tarkovsky, scored by Edward Artemiev. It's been ages since I've seen it, but some of the tracks really helped heighten the creepy mood. That scene when the protagonists are kind of sunk in the ground and the camera very slowly pans across a creek or river... Still freaks me out just thinking about it.

Les parapluies de Cherbourg (The Umbrellas of Cherbourg) - It's not prog, but what can I say, I have a soft spot for this film musical, LOL. Scored by Michel Legrand.

2001: A Space Odyssey - those Ligeti choral pieces are still frightening

Solaris - Not the Tarkovsky original, but the superior re-make (in my opinion) by Soderberg. Cliff Martinez's score is haunting.

L'ange - made by Patrick Bokanowski, scored by his wife, the composer Michčle Bokanowski. I'd be shocked if anyone else here has seen this. It's a classic avant-garde movie made in France in 1983. A bit hard to find as well, but well worth it if you like this sort of thing.

Vanilla Sky - The problem is that the official soundtrack doesn't contain many of the songs that appear in this movie. This American sci-fi film from 2001 (a remake of the Mexican film Open Your Eyes, which is usually considered to be better) featured many new pieces from albums that weren't new enough to be considered masterpieces yet: Radiohead's Everything In Its Right Place from Kid A (also from 2001) and I Might Be Wrong (from Amnesiac), Sigur Ros's Svefn-g-englar and Njosnavelin (at the time called The Nothing Song, and which wouldn't be released till 2002), REM's Sweetness Follows from Automatic for the People (also wouldn't be released till 2002), Spiritualized's Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space, and other electronic music that was quite uncommon for an American film: Leftfield's Afrika Shox, Chemical Brothers' Where Do I Begin, tracks by Thievery Corporation and Underworld...



Edited by jude111 - July 27 2013 at 14:10
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The.Crimson.King View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 26 2013 at 23:19
I seem to recall the soundtrack to the old tom cruise movie Risky Business and that Tangerine Dream did some tracks on it Question
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Post Options Post Options   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 08:10
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

I seem to recall the soundtrack to the old tom cruise movie Risky Business and that Tangerine Dream did some tracks on it Question

They recorded a couple of new tracks - The Dream Is Always The Same and Love On A Real Train and also reworked some of Tangram Part One and Force Majeure Part One. The soundtrack album also features others artists.

If you want those original tracks they can be found on the excellent TD compilation Dream Sequence.

TD have done a few decent soundtracks. My favourite is Firestarter which will be on my list. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 08:19
1. Nighthawks - Keith Emerson
2. The Good, The Bad and The Ugly - Ennio Morricone
3. Firestarter - Tangerine Dream
4. Blade Runner - Vangelis
5. Alien - Jerry Goldsmith

can't really get beyond 5 without repeating the artists
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 08:29
Anything by Ennio Morricone really....

I'll have to think about specific releases though, but he is without a doubt THE most innovative and brilliant of the famous movie composers imo. Any film supported by the back draft of Morricone's haunting, and at times rather playful music, naturally improves as a direct consequence of that. Even past his "golden days" of spaghetti westerns, you get the majestic beauty of The Mission - a soundtrack that not only rivals his best work, it additionally had a fluid stream of images equalling the music's greatness. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 08:36
Oh and huge shout out goes to Danish experimental musicians Peter Peter off of the famous Danish post punk band Sort Sol (Black Sun) and Peter Kyed for their eerie ambient feedback monster of a soundtrack they did for Valhalla Rising. Together with the movie, it's like a long hazy dream with shifting images of natural beauty and man made horrors.
Love that flick.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote AlexDOM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 13:17
Tron Legacy- Daft Punk
I love the Top Gun Soundtrack with various artists
Sucker Punch- various covers
Dredd- forgot the composer...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mongofa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 13:44
Not in order

Eraserhead - David Lynch and Alan Splet
Fargo - Carter Burwell
The Conversation - David Shire
Chariots of Fire - Vangelis Papathanassiou
Once Upon a Time in the West - Ennio Morricone
The Graduate - Simon and Garfunkel
The Social Network - Trent Reznor
The Third Man - Anton Karas
Blood Simple - Carter Burwell
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly - Ennio Morricone

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Barbu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 13:47


Have you seen them Khajiits?
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Post Options Post Options   Quote BrufordFreak Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 16:20
Whoa! Awesome post, Jude111! Great List! Thanks for the detailed reasoning for your choices. Diva, Stalker, Solaris, 2001, and Vanilla Sky are all awesome soundtracks, though three of the five use a variety of people's compositions. I was really thinking more of soundtracks in which all of the music is composed and performed by one artist--like Solaris, Blade Runner, and John Williams, Hans Zimmer, james Newton Howard, Ennio Morricone, etc.  

Also, Guldbamsen: Big thumbs up to Morricone!



Edited by BrufordFreak - July 27 2013 at 16:22
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Post Options Post Options   Quote The.Crimson.King Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 27 2013 at 17:22
Originally posted by mongofa


The Graduate - Simon and Garfunkel

OMG, how did I miss this one?
I'm using the chicken to measure it.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 28 2013 at 07:02
I wanted to include Monsters Ball in my list but it has two people composing and playing. Great ambient soundtrack though.

However if Simon and Garfunkel is allowed then maybe...

Also I second the David Lynch suggestion for Eraserhead. Claustrophobic and scary.

Reminded of John Carpenter's The Thing which was composed and performed by the man himself. Superb soundtrack which would be No 6 on my list.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ole-the-first Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 28 2013 at 07:14
Twin Peaks by Angelo Badalamenti

The Omen by Jerry Goldsmith
This night wounds time.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Metalmarsh89 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 28 2013 at 11:25
Phil Collins' Tarzan Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 28 2013 at 11:43
Marc Streitenfield---THE GREY
VANGELIS--BLADERUNNER
Various Artists---2001 A SPACE ODYSSEY
mark Edleman & Randy Bachman---THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS
Hans Zimmer--BLACK RAIN
* Elliot Goldenthal---ALIEN 3
Daft Punk--TRON LEGACY
Clint Mansell--REQUIEM FOR A DREAM
Jerry Goldsmith--ALIENS
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart---AMADEUS (obviously lol)
Wendy Carlos--score for A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
    
How Transatlantic's Kaleidoscope beat IQ's The Road Of Bones in the Prog album of the year category at this years Prog awards (2014) is beyond me.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Slartibartfast Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 28 2013 at 12:52
I've been a soundtrack fan before I was a prog fan.  In my first batch of albums from Columbia House many years ago I got the Earthquake and Airport '75 soundtracks, which aren't particularly memorable.  I'd like to put in the good word for a couple of soundtracks by artists where they did something outside their normal style - Toto's Dune and the Eurythimics 1984.  Of course pretty much any soundtrack by Badalamenti, Vangelis, or Tangerine Dream.  Peter Gabriel's forays into soundtracking are pretty good...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote moshkito Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 28 2013 at 13:01
Hi,
 
We need to send you to the movies!
 
We have to start with some history of film!
 
1. You need to catch 2 or 3 Bernard Herrmann soundtrax with Alfred Hitchcock,
2. Jason and the Argonauts - Bernard Herrmann
3. Dr. Zhivago - David Lean and Maurice Jarre
4. Last Emperor - David Byrne and Ryuichi Sakamoto
5. The Last Buddha - Ryuichi Sakamoto
6. Performance - Nicholas Roeg and Don Cammell
7. Journey of Hope - Jan Garbarek and Terje Rypdal
8. The Double Life of Veronique - Zbiginew Preissner (spelling)
9. Aguirre, the Wrath of God - Werner Herzog
10. Purple Rain - Prince (by far one of the best "real" rock movies ever done!)
11. Tous Les Matins Du Monde - Film with Depardieu
12. Chariots of Fire and Blade Runner - Vangelis
 
There are a couple of Chinese and Japanese films I wanted to add, and will do so later ... I have more reviews to upload.
 
You really want to keep an on some folks that also do music. Take a look at this!
 
Ryuichi Sakamoto - Yellow Magic Orchestra and many Soundtracks - Massively involved in the development of the synthesizer in Japan. Also is an actor in many films
 
David Bowie - Acted in many films. His work in music has picked up more from the folks that he worked with as a director, than anything else. Working with Nicholas Roeg ended up helping him and Eno create "Low". He also did a lot of work with Brechtian instructors and even recorded some of it.
 
Popol Vuh- Their music appeared in several films by Werner Herzog. The interview that you can find on PA is very good on explaining that.
 
Vangelis - Started out with Aphrodite's Child ... with the father of "progressive music. Mr. Gomelsky! Check out his other acts at the time, and that is eons ahead of time!
 
Jean Michel Jarre - son of Maurice. Taught his father the synthesizers and such, and then the father went out and won another Oscar for his soundtrack. He is probably the only composer that succeeded in both genres, and you know why ... it was about the music for him, not the equipment! You could say he showed his son something!
 
More to come as I remember it!
 
 
 
 


Edited by moshkito - July 28 2013 at 13:36
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

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richardh View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: July 29 2013 at 01:40
Moshkito  - what about Tomita? I think he has composed music for several Japanese films and arguably was the most important figure in Japan as regards the development of the synthesizer?
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