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what means the sufix /age/ in Language

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Icarium View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Icarium Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: what means the sufix /age/ in Language
    Posted: January 17 2014 at 09:29
what does it mean, in words like language, lineage, has it something to do with longevity, as long age, or lunge age, age of a line?
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Guldbamsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 17 2014 at 09:32
I'm not sure I understand the question.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote dr wu23 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 17 2014 at 09:34
Et In Arcadia Ego
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 17 2014 at 12:19
^ What he said.

It is a suffix that is added to a word to make a noun that describes the action of that word so 'language' the word root would be 'langu' which comes from 'lingua' (of the tongue) so language is an action created by the tongue, ie speech. 

Lineage is the action of a line and is not related to time.

Most words ending in -age entered into the English language from French, the equivalent Germanic suffix is -ing


Edited by Dean - January 17 2014 at 12:22


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Post Options Post Options   Quote timothy leary Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 17 2014 at 12:32
Garb.....age
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 17 2014 at 12:39
..exactly. Possibly from Garbe - the entrails of an animal - here the "age" would be the rarer a collective use so garbe-age would be a collection of entrails. Contrasting this with Silage ... meaning fodder in a silo 


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Post Options Post Options   Quote someone_else Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 09:23
Mess... age
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Andy Webb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 09:39
^Of course meaning that talking to people is too much of a mess so we shouldn't bother.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 09:40
I sense there is now a pretty good understanding in this matter.

Knowl--Age. (Just kidding)
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 09:57
Originally posted by someone_else

Mess... age
Simples. from the Latin Missus, to send (same root as missive) therefore a message is a something that you send. Tongue


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Post Options Post Options   Quote someone_else Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 10:00
Originally posted by Dean


Originally posted by someone_else

Mess... age

Simples. from the Latin Missus, to send (same root as missive) therefore a message is a something that you send. Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Polymorphia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 10:02
LOL I like how Dean has become our etymology search engine in this thread.

Gar-age?

Your move, Dean. Wink


Edited by Polymorphia - January 20 2014 at 10:03
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 11:07
Originally posted by Polymorphia

LOL I like how Dean has become our etymology search engine in this thread.

Gar-age?

Your move, Dean. Wink
Prolly something to do with shelter, garret and garrison come to mind but I cannot think of the root word (I could look it up, then so could you). I suspect it is a relatively modern word (because I cannot think I've ever seen the word used in any other context), so it may just be an invented word that not have a clear etymology heritage.


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Post Options Post Options   Quote timothy leary Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 11:11
Most of them come from France as does garage
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Post Options Post Options   Quote someone_else Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 11:52
Originally posted by Dean

Originally posted by Polymorphia

LOL I like how Dean has become our etymology search engine in this thread.

Gar-age?

Your move, Dean. Wink
Prolly something to do with shelter, garret and garrison come to mind but I cannot think of the root word (I could look it up, then so could you). I suspect it is a relatively modern word (because I cannot think I've ever seen the word used in any other context), so it may just be an invented word that not have a clear etymology heritage.

Maybe it is related to the French word gare (station)...
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Polymorphia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 20 2014 at 12:18
Originally posted by Dean

Originally posted by Polymorphia

LOL I like how Dean has become our etymology search engine in this thread.

Gar-age?

Your move, Dean. Wink
Prolly something to do with shelter, garret and garrison come to mind but I cannot think of the root word (I could look it up, then so could you). I suspect it is a relatively modern word (because I cannot think I've ever seen the word used in any other context), so it may just be an invented word that not have a clear etymology heritage.
I looked it up before I wrote it. Tongue

Originally posted by Wiktionary


Borrowing from French garage (“keeping under cover, protection, shelter”), derivative of French garer (“to keep under cover, dock, shunt, guard, keep”), from Middle French garer, garrer, guerrer; partly from Old French garir, warir (from Old Frankish *warjan); and partly from Old French varer (“to fight, defend oneself, protect”), from Old Norse varask (“to defend oneself”), reflexive of vara (“to ware, watch out, defend”); both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *warjaną (“to defend, ward off”), *warōną (“to watch, protect”), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (“to close, cover, protect, save, defend”).
Not actually from Latin, so I was wondering if the "age" rule applied to a French word with a non-Latin root. Sort of in the vein of the previous few comments writing words to which they thought the rule might not apply. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Atkingani Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2014 at 19:07
It's a common feature for the so-called "Latin languages" (Romance or Romanic or Neo-Latin languages). Compare: voyage (French), viaggio (Italian), viagem (Portuguese), viaje (Spanish).

The suffix or ending -age entered English via French as mentioned above. Actually this ending comprises a couple of Latin suffixes: -aticum (viaticum, hence viaggio, voyage, etc), -inis (cartilaginis), etc.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Polymorphia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: January 22 2014 at 21:33
Originally posted by Atkingani

It's a common feature for the so-called "Latin languages" (Romance or Romanic or Neo-Latin languages). Compare: voyage (French), viaggio (Italian), viagem (Portuguese), viaje (Spanish).

The suffix or ending -age entered English via French as mentioned above. Actually this ending comprises a couple of Latin suffixes: -aticum (viaticum, hence viaggio, voyage, etc), -inis (cartilaginis), etc.
This answers my question, as well, actually. Thanks! Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Quote HackettFan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2014 at 19:16
Store + age = Storage

I always think of -age as conveying a mass collection of things as above (a collection of things that have been stored, but that's not always the case:

e.g. Stop + age = Stoppage, Break + age = Breakage, Leak + age = Leakage, Slip + age = Slippage
these all seem to pertain to a location of interest on or within some object.

Awhile back we had a productive use of -age: Tune + age = Tunage. A collection of tunes that someone has on hand. This example adds -age to something that's already a noun (I say that because the verb form does not seem to be as relevant). However, the same may have happened with 'baggage' or 'package', although 'bag' and 'pack' can be verbs too. It doesn't work for 'package', but notice that 'baggage' is never a single bag. It is a collection of bags that one has on hand.

Edited by HackettFan - April 20 2014 at 19:24
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 20 2014 at 20:31
Originally posted by HackettFan

Store + age = Storage 

I always think of it as conveying a mass collection of things,
Partially, adding -age to an existing noun or verb converts it to a mass noun (ie a non-count noun) so in a sense it is a mass collection because it converts the word store into an object that cannot be counted. This means it does not have a plural form, you can say that a closet has storage or lots of storage or some storage but you would not say it has a storage or 5 storages.

Adding "-age" to "store" produces a mass noun that describes the action of the word store ("stores are for storage", "this store has lots of storage")
Originally posted by HackettFan

but that's not always the case: 

e.g. Stop + age = Stoppage, Break + age = Breakage, Leak + age = Leakage, Slip + age = Slippage 
these all seem to pertain to a location of interest on or within some object.
They are all nouns that describe still the action of the root word. Stoppage is the act of stopping; Breakage is the act of breaking ...etc. 

Stoppage, Breakage, Leakage and Slippage can be either mass nouns (there has been some breakage) or count nouns, usually when used in the past tense (there were 5 breakages).

Originally posted by HackettFan


Awhile back we had a productive use of -age: Tune + age = Tunage. A collection of tunes that someone has on hand. This example adds -age to something that's already a noun (I say that because the verb form does not seem to be as relevant).
Even though tuneage is a made-up hipster slang word and is a somewhat artificial creation of a mass noun, it still follows the form of converting the word "tune" into a mass noun by describing the (admittedly abstract) action of a tune.

Unfortunately that doesn't necessarily work with all hep slang words ending age, such as foodage (a mass noun but not really the action of food), but does work with drinkage, eatage and munchage.

Originally posted by HackettFan

However, the same may have happened with 'baggage' or 'package', although 'bag' and 'pack' can be verbs too.
Baggage is the the act of bagging, package is the act of packing - both are mass nouns that can also be count-nouns (you could add luggage too, and amusingly enough, that really does mean the act of lugging).


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