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Mysteries of Rock: Kurt Cobain was murdered?

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    Posted: April 06 2014 at 00:54
Washington man sues Seattle police over new Kurt Cobain death scene
April 5, 2014, 5:25 PM EST
WENN

A Washington man who still believes Kurt Cobain was murdered has launched a lawsuit against Seattle police officials over the release of new photos from the death scene.   

Conspiracy theorist Richard Lee, who fronted his own public access TV show "Kurt Cobain Was Murdered," claims the shots should have been released years ago to aid the investigation into the tragic Nirvana star's death 20 years ago.   

The previously undeveloped film stills, released last month as Nirvana fans prepare to mark the anniversary of the singer's passing, feature images of a cigar box containing Cobain's heroin kit, and the late singer's wallet and identification.   

A police investigation determined that Cobain had committed suicide, but many fans are still convinced the Nirvana star was killed.

 

http://music.msn.com/music/article.aspx?news=860856



Edited by Svetonio - April 07 2014 at 01:20
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Svetonio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 01:40
Jimi Hendrix died under very mysterious circumstances too.

The Jimi Hendrix Murder Conspiracy, Was Jimi Hendrix Murdered?
Jimi Hendrix Murder Conspiracy

Jimi Hendrix is an icon in the hard rock music vein. To this day almost 40 years after his death, he is seen as one of the most influential rock guitarists in rock history. His showmanship as well as his technical prowess remains unmatched, and despite a mere five albums, his music is a staple in the world of rock and roll.

Hendrix died on September 18, 1970 - slightly a year following his legendary performance at the Woodstock music festival, and the circumstances surrounding his death are still speculated upon. After a couple of days missing, Hendrix was found dead at the flat of his girlfriend Monika Dannemann. The autopsy revealed large quantities of red wine in his stomach along with his lungs. The official cause of death was recorded as inhalation of vomit and barbiturate intoxication.

The recorded facts paint a vague portrait of Hendrix's death, and the events surrounding the incident leave a lot of questions unanswered. Did Jimi Hendrix simply fall victim to the excessive lifestyle in which many other musicians have met their doom, or is there more to his death than meets the eye?

          
On the morning of his death, girlfriend Dannemann claims to have woken up to find Hendrix sleeping normally and proceeded to go out for cigarettes. Upon return her story states that she found that Hendrix had gotten sick and was having trouble breathing. She called Eric Burdon of the Animals who they had partied with the night before; he demanded that she call an ambulance. Dannemann claims that the ambulance arrived at about 11:30 a.m. and that she rode with Hendrix on the way to the hospital where he suffocated en route.

The recollection of the ambulance attendants are a direct contradiction of Dannemann's story and claim that the apartment was empty except for Hendrix lying dead on the bed. After an unsuccessful attempt at revival, they pronounced him dead. The autopsy failed to conclude the time of death, but it was evident that Hendrix had been dead for some time before the paramedics arrived.

Eric Burdon initially claimed that Hendrix's death was a suicide, but the facts also contradict this notion. Despite Hendrix's increasingly erratic behavior and the dark circumstances present in his life, close friends claim that he was relatively happy at the time. Hendrix was found with nine Vesperax sleeping pills in his system which are said to contribute to his death. He was a chronic insomniac who was resistant to the effects of barbiturates and would not have felt such disastrous effects from nine pills. He was also found with a pack of 42 Vesperax in his pocket which would rule out suicide. If Hendrix was intent on self-termination, it is assumed that he would have taken all of the Vesperax.

Granted, mixing alcohol with downers is asking for trouble, but the amount of red wine found in Hendrix's lungs suggests something more gruesome. It's extremely rare that someone who intends on a night of hard drinking binges with such rapidity that the alcohol actually reaches their lungs. The low blood alcohol content in comparison with the amount of wine found in Hendrix's body meant that the ingestion of the wine was so quick that it didn't even have time to enter his blood stream. This inconsistency suggests that excessive drinking was not the cause of death. The physical evidence suggests that the excessive amounts of wine in his stomach as well as lungs are more consistent with being water boarded.

There were many people who were believed to benefit from Hendrix's removal. The COINTELPRO or Counter Intelligence Program designed by the FBI was aimed at eliminating subversive behavior within the country. Hendrix appearance at "subversive" benefits resulted in the FBI opening a dossier on him, and his ability to motivate masses were seen by COINTELPRO as less than innocuous. Hendrix connection to manager Mike Jeffery only furthered his surveillance by the FBI. Jeffery had on numerous occasions alluded to being connected to underground organizations. He was in the process of building a recording studio in a part of New York which was primarily mob controlled. In addition, Cynthia McKinney, US House Representative and Green Party nominee for President of the United States in 2008, has pinned Hendrix's murder on a government plot to eradicate such leaders. Moreover, Hendrix had publically called upon the Black Panther party to go to Washington, DC and shoot the place up.

The web of unsavory individuals and circumstances surrounding Hendrix raises even more questions about his death. It was reported that Mike Jeffery was intent on manipulating Hendrix's life as well as siphoning his money into his own offshore bank accounts. There is also a mention of a million dollar life insurance policy covering Hendrix and listing Jeffery as the beneficiary. Although Jeffery was in Spain during Hendrix's death, conspiracy theorists speculate that he may have had a part in it.

Jimi Hendrix was not a drug addict; he did not die of a heroin overdose as was initially printed in some publications as the cause of death. The fact stands that Hendrix did die of choking on his own vomit, but whom or what induced this? Did COINTELPRO off Hendrix in order to prevent subversion? Did mob connections between Jeffery put Hendrix in the line of mob violence? Did Jeffery orchestrate his death for the purpose of royalties and a hefty insurance policy? These questions will probably never be answered. The deaths of Jeffery in a mysterious mid-air collision over France in 1973 and the suicide of Monika Dannemann in 1996 leave very few people who were present at the time of Hendrix's death able to offer information.

Friends state that in Hendrix's final days, he became increasingly more paranoid. Did Hendrix have a feeling that his end was coming soon? We may never know what actually transpired on September 18, 1970 and the question remains: who killed Jimi Hendrix?


http://www.woodstockstory.com/jimi-hendrix-murdered-conspiracy.html


Home > Features > The Mysterious Death Of Jimi Hendrix
The Mysterious Death Of Jimi Hendrix
First published in Classic Rock 135, August 2009.

Was Jimi Hendrix murdered by a manager with an MI5 past and debts to the Mafia? Hendrix biographer Harry Shapiro talks to former roadie James ‘Tappy’ Wright and reconsiders the mysteries surrounding Jimi Hendrix’s death…

Words: Harry Shapiro

It’s February 1973 at the London apartment of Jimi Hendrix’s manager, Mike Jeffery. The only other person there is James ‘Tappy’ Wright, a softly-spoken Geordie who has been working for Mike since the early 60s in Newcastle when Jeffrey was a club owner and manager of The Animals. The night is wearing on, the ashtrays are full, the bourbon is flowing.

Mike owned the rights to Jimi Plays Berkeley, a film of Hendrix’s May 1970 concert at the Berkeley Community Center in San Franciso, widely regarded as among one of Jimi’s finest performances. After Jimi died, Mike had the idea that he would tour the film supported by live acts in his stable, Cat Mother and Jimmy and Vella. Because so many people who wanted to see Jimi never had the chance, watching him perform in a film coming out through a rock sound system in a cinema was the next best thing and according to Tappy, the tours of the UK and Europe were a huge success. So now they sit planning to take the idea to the States and this leads to a general reminiscence about Jimi and his last days.

“I can remember this as if it were yesterday,” says Tappy today, sitting in London’s Groucho club, remembering the night that Jeffery apparently confessed to Hendrix’s murder. “As we are talking, Mike began to get very agitated and pale. ‘I had no bloody choice, I had to do it’. ‘What are you talking about?’ ‘You know exactly what I’m talking about. It was either that or I’d be broke or dead’.

“I have to say that it did confirm suspicions that I had, that a lot of people had, only everybody was too scared to come forward and say anything. He was telling me, I didn’t ask and to be honest I really didn’t want to hear this.”

Mike gave away few details and Tappy didn’t press him further: “All he said was he got a few of his friends – I don’t know who they were, just some villains that Mike knew from up north and it was just booze down the windpipe. Like in that film Get Carter. [See the murder scene he's referring to here.]

“I don’t know why he told me. I think though, if you’ve done a crime it’s a natural thing to want to tell somebody – it’s hard to keep it to yourself. And he did know that he could trust me. I certainly knew what he was capable of – and I definitely believed him.”

Barely a month later, Mike Jeffery was dead. Flying back from Majorca, his Iberian Airways DC-9 flight was in a mid-air collision over France. There were no survivors. Mike was terrified of flying and was in the habit of making several reservations at once and then choosing his flight at the last minute to escape the fates. But on 5th March 1973 his luck ran out and the full story behind his shocking confession died with him.

Tappy admits he sought no corroborative evidence then or since for Mike’s story: “Whoever else was involved was still out there and they might have thought Mike told me everything. So I kept my mouth shut, although I did tell my close friend, Bob Levine who was part of Jimi’s management team in New York. He told me to disappear.”

Eventually Tappy moved back up north and became a club owner. In the early 80s rock manager Rod Weinberg reformed The Animals and Tappy found himself back in the business. “I asked Tappy to get involved because I needed somebody to keep Eric and Chas apart,” says Rod. From their chats about the past came the idea for the book which they started ten years ago.

Manager Mike Jeffery: allegedly confessed to having Jimi murdered.
So what motive could Mike Jeffery possibly have had for killing his major source of income and the biggest rock star in the world?

Flashback to September 1966. The Animals had broken up over the summer. Bassist Chas Chandler was sick of the road and wanted to move into production. Keith Richards’ girlfriend Linda Keith had persuaded Chas to come see a young guitar player strut his stuff down at the Café Wha in Greenwich Village. Impressed with what he saw, Chas tried to cut a deal for Jimi Hendrix even before he brought him back to the UK. Nobody was interested. He had no more luck in the early days in London as he showcased his new find around the club scene. Everyone was blown away. Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Pete Townshend were in collective shock, but still no done deals. Chas quickly realised he needed a business partner. He turned to The Animals manager, Mike Jeffery. Nobody in the band had trusted Mike, believing he had devised an offshore tax scam simply as a way of stealing all their money. But John Hillman, the lawyer who administered the offshore company in the Bahamas called Yameta, is adamant that, “The Animals without Mike Jeffery were nothing.” Mike was a sharp operator with connections – and now Chas was on the other side, Mike’s side.

Mike Jeffery was born in south London in March 1933. The son of two postal workers, Mike had an average school career, but was quite sporty. He was called up for National Service in 1951 and then signed on as a full-time professional soldier. He was drafted into the Intelligence Corps and from then on, not surprisingly, his army career becomes a bit murky. He later told tales of undercover work in Egypt during the Suez Crisis in 1956, counter-espionage work against the Russians and general murder and mayhem in foreign parts. Some of this ‘Austin Powers – Man of Mystery’ routine may have been employed to impress (and frighten) the young musicians he later had under his wing. But his father Frank did say that Mike could speak fluent Russian, that much of his army career was spent in ‘civvies’ and that when he was at home, he rarely spoke about what he did.

But probably his crowning achievement in the service of Queen and Country, was to make serious money selling old newspapers to British soldiers stationed in Egypt. Troops abroad are always desperate for news from home. Mike found out that in Cairo (off limits to soldiers) newspapers were on sale that were only a few days old. Strictly against the rules, he commandeered a truck and began shipping piles of papers back to the base. He was caught, but cut his commanding officer a slice of the action and still had enough money to start up in Newcastle as a club owner, but not before he earned himself a degree at Newcastle University. So no stranger to danger, Mike proved himself intelligent, charming and street-smart.

First published in CR135, August 2009.
In October 1966, Jimi, Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell signed a production contract with Chas and Mike, but on 1st December, Jimi alone signed a four-year management contract with Mike. Not only were Noel and Mitch excluded – even Chas’ name didn’t appear until some time later. Right from the outset, Noel and Mitch were only ever regarded by Mike and Yameta as ‘employees’ and whatever Jimi might have said to them verbally, this state of affairs was reflected in the contracts. For Mike, Jimi was the star and he wanted as few obstacles in the way of his investment as possible. Eventually they signed to Track Records in the UK, but Mike’s big coup was signing with Warner Brothers in January 1967. Aside from the recording contract itself, he negotiated a $20,000 promotion budget, unheard of for an unknown artist’s debut album, and he wangled an exclusion clause for any soundtrack recordings – something Warners would regret later. On top of that, Warners agreed not to sign Jimi directly, but instead to sign for the services of Yameta which contracted to supply the ‘master recordings of Jimi Hendrix or the Jimi Hendrix Experience’ to Warners – and in doing so Yameta retained ‘exclusive and perpetual ownership of all masters recorded’. Not even The Beatles or the Stones owned their masters.

So with the substantial backing of a major US label, the Jimi Hendrix Rock Machine began to roll. Like Cream, the band spent more and more time in the States in search of the big bucks. The tours got longer, the concert fees rose, especially when Mike arranged for self-promotion of the band. Instead of dealing with dozens of different promoters all over the States, they dealt with a handful and paid them a percentage to promote the band. And he also wised-up very early on, to the earning power of merchandising – so more cash for the Experience coffers.

But by mid-1968, cracks were appearing in the organisation. Jimi knew he had Chas and Mike to thank for everything, but he was beginning to resent what he saw as Chas’ grip on his creativity. This came to a head during the recording of Electric Ladyland at the Record Plant in New York where Jimi was bringing in extra musicians to move away from the trio format. Chas also got cheesed off about the drugs, especially LSD – and the growing band of groupies and hangers-on that infested the recording sessions. Chas decided to cut his ties as Jimi’s producer and went back to England, although for the time being, he retained his management interests. Jimi too was getting tired of Mike’s insistence on the need for constant touring – and moreover, the audience expectation that he would smash his amps or set fire to the guitar and the general boredom of playing the same songs every night. As he said later, he was fed up ‘playing the clown’. Matters came to a head in the summer of 1969. The band’s performances became unpredictable depending on Jimi’s mood.

Sometimes exhilarating and powerful, other times scrappy and ill-prepared with Jimi, Noel and Mitch hardly looking at each other. Noel left, Billy Cox was brought in and Jimi repaired to a rented house in Shokan, upstate New York to consider the future. Although Mitch stayed on, Jimi began talking about Sky Church Music and gathered around him a whole group of new musicians of varying quality who played a patchy performance at Woodstock in front of the 30,000 people left on the Monday morning after everybody had gone home.

Then Jimi went off the road and Mike Jeffery went nuts. Despite all the success, the cash was running out. Although Mike had struck great recording deals, actually getting the money out of the record companies was the devil’s own job – they were always months or even years in arrears. So the real money was in touring – often thousands of dollars in suitcases and paper bags. But once Jimi left the Woodstock stage on 18th August 1969, he turned his back on touring until 25th April 1970 and the start of the ‘Cry Of Love’ tour.

So the income was falling while the expenses were going off the radar. Jimi had no concerns for studio costs – he spent hours and hours just jamming and experimenting. Electric Ladyland alone cost $60,000. The band always spent heavily; limos, hotels, paying the bills for the damaged and the doomed who hung round Jimi’s neck, and who he could never refuse. He loved fast cars (although he was as blind as a bat) and one weekend bought nine guitars. Mike was no stranger to spending either. As a character on the music scene, he was always felt something of an outsider. With his perennial prescription dark glasses and long black coat, he cultivated an air of menace, but he desperately wanted to be accepted among the American rock management elite, men like Dylan’s manager Albert Grossman. Partly as a way of getting closer to Jimi, he took on more of the hippy look and dropped lots of acid. In the summer of ’69, he bought an expensive house among the hip rock community in upstate New York and rented the house at Shokan for Jimi.

Then there was the financial black hole that was Electric Lady Studios. Mike had great success as a club owner both in the UK and Spain and tried to persuade Jimi to invest in a club in New York. Eventually this evolved into the idea of building a state of the art studio. Nice idea, shame about the location. In his book, Tappy recalls that ‘New York’s Eighth Street was right in the heart of Mafia territory; there were already four Italian clubs in the neighbourhood and the mob were not keen of having a rock star with Jimi’s reputation setting up shop in their midst and bringing a lot of unwanted attention into their area’.

Roadie James 'Tappy' WrightRoadie James ‘Tappy’ Wright: “I knew what Jeffery was capable of.”
Against that backdrop, there were endless problems getting the necessary building permits and then the site was flooded after they discovered they were building right on top of an underground river. And as shrewd as Mike might have been, he could also be impulsive. When it came to equipping the studio, instead of trying to arrange instalment plans for purchasing, attorney Howard Krantz says ‘Jeffery would just…buy the item outright’ adding to the cash flow problems. So even though Mike secured a whopping loan from Warner’s, the original budget of $500,000 soon became a distant memory. Mike took the very dangerous step of borrowing money from the Mob. Bob Levine, who had worked for Sinatra, knew these guys and would act as the go-between.

Tappy says he would “drive up to these big houses with gates, just like you see in the movies. Bob would tell me to wait in the car and then he’d come out with a package.” The Godfather and The Sopranos have embedded gangsters in our popular mythology, so it is easy to forget that the Mafia are real and really do hurt people who cross them. Added to which Mike had left some unfinished business in London: Electric Lady studio manager Jim Marron remembers Jeffery telling him he owed someone $20,000: “They sent a guy over to kill [Mike] if he didn’t pay. That won his respect” – and he paid up.

And if that wasn’t enough, he had the American Inland Revenue Service (IRS) on his tail. Jimi never benefited from the Yameta tax haven because he was a US citizen; only UK citizens could afford paying tax in this way. Nor could Mike legally bring in any money from the Bahamas without the IRS getting their chunk. So Bob Levine recalls Mike’s assistants Trixie Sullivan and Kathy Eberth, arriving in New York with wodges of cash stuffed in bras and boots. The IRS was threatening to impound Electric Lady if Mike didn’t start making some regular payments. So he was treading a very fine line financially and was perpetually in need of cash injections to keep the boat afloat.

Forward planning was not his strong suit, says concert promoter Ron Terry: “[Mike] planned from minute to minute. If he was broke, he reacted and that put pressure on his artist.”

Mike was also becoming very concerned not only about his worsening relationship with Jimi, but about those he saw as posing a threat to his position and his income. The music business was and still is, a hotbed of suspicion and paranoia. Maybe because of his involvement in Cold War activities, Mike’s sense of paranoia was more finely tuned than most. He was always wary of those who were much closer to Jimi than he would ever be and often tried to engineer ways of dividing and ruling. Early on, he applied this technique to Chas and Record Plant staff like producer Eddie Kramer and engineer Gary Kellgren. But from 1969, Mike’s paranoia became more focused and intense. He even bugged Bob Levine’s office to keep track of what was going on, so distant was he feeling from Jimi and his circle. The band’s PR agent in the States, Michael Goldstein observed that Mike “would stop at nothing to ensure the success of his artists, but he couldn’t relate to them personally”.

Mike was very angry that Jimi refused to tour and blamed much of this on his renewed relationship with drummer Buddy Miles. To compound the crime, Jimi was working at the Record Plant with a new producer, Alan Douglas. Jimi had met Douglas through Devon Wilson, a notorious New York groupie who had a strange and rather unhealthy relationship with Jimi. Douglas was essentially a jazz producer who also had interests in films and books and Jimi quite liked his more New York bohemian, laid-back attitude. But the recording sessions were not very fruitful and Alan Douglas was no match for Mike Jeffery, so much so that Alan wrote to Jimi in December 1969 saying he didn’t want to produce him any more.

Still Jimi pressed on with plans for a new band with Buddy and bassist Billy Cox. Without Mike’s permission, the Band Of Gypsys played two dates at Fillmore East over New Year 1970, before Mike intervened, not only firing Buddy, but insisting that Jimi reform the Experience. Noel Redding was put on standby, but eventually The Cry Of Love tour kicked off with Billy Cox on bass and Mitch Mitchell.
The US tour was a good money-spinner, but still Mike had mounting debt. A critical element in the story is whether or not Mike had taken out an insurance policy on Jimi’s life. When Warner Brothers concluded a whole new set of agreements with Jimi in 1968, they took out an insurance policy, something which had become standard practice since the death of Otis Redding in 1967. Mike also prepared a similar policy and the document was in with a whole pile of concert contracts waiting for signature while they were in Hawaii filming Rainbow Bridge. Bob Levine spotted it and says he warned Jimi not to sign it; Tappy says he did.

Although from Mike’s point of view, Jimi was back on track, their relationship was souring by the day. Jimi was incensed that by forcing him to fire Buddy, he was now interfering in the creative side, something he had never done before. Mike now had one eye on the calendar – his contract with Jimi expired on 1st December 1970 and he became increasingly convinced that Jimi would jump ship. With Electric Lady Studio at least partially open, Jimi had been working there for about a month. The very last thing he wanted to do was more touring, but he signed contracts to tour Europe in the autumn of 1970. A lacklustre performance at the Isle of Wight Festival was followed by a disastrous show in Arhus, Denmark, which was stopped after only a couple of songs. Jimi was still reeling from the effects of a handful of unidentified pills he had taken earlier just to block the misery of his situation. Worse was to follow in Germany on the Isle of Fehmarn where the atrocious weather and warring Hell’s Angels encapsulated the sorry mess of Jimi’s faltering career [read the inside story of that last gig here].

So Mike knew the clock was running out on his contract with Jimi. He had a mountain of debt which included two creditors you didn’t mess with – the Mafia and the IRS. But while it is true that Mike’s management contract with Jimi expired at the end of 1970, Mike still had quite an investment in Jim’s career. He had a half-share in the studio, various considerations as a result of the new deal struck by Warners with Jimi in 1968 and because of that little exclusion clause from ’67, had rights over two films, Jimi Plays Berkeley and Rainbow Bridge. And while Jimi might have made a lot of noise about finding a new manager, who could that have been? The only name ever mooted was Alan Douglas and Jimi knew full well that Alan was not even close to being as effective as Mike. So it needed to be a major player who was also prepared to take on Mike Jeffery with all that might entail. That said, if Mike had lost Jimi, he would have lost the share of the concert revenue, which as we have seen, was the most immediate and lucrative cash cow. And given the level of Mike’s paranoia over money and Jimi, it was enough that he believed it. He might have calculated that Jimi Hendrix was worth more to him dead than alive – but did he engineer it?

JImi and Monica Dannemann
The key to the last few hours of Jimi’s life lies with the testimony of Monika Dannemann. Born into a wealthy German family, Monika was a talented artist whose career as a skater was cut short by injury. She first met Jimi very briefly in Germany in early ’69 and not again until a few days before his death – although she claimed that Jimi kept in touch, writing her letters she refused to let anybody see.

I interviewed Monika in 1989, for my biography Electric Gypsy, travelling down to Seaford on the south coast of England. Her house was situated in a quiet, respectable street. She opened the door and there she stood looking exactly as she did the day Jimi died: striking blonde hair, heavily made up, wearing a crushed velvet dress and a jangle of jewellery. The sense that time had stood still for Monika was underlined when I went inside. The walls were covered in her artwork – every painting featured Jimi Hendrix. The house was a shrine. She was very friendly and, in her quiet way, told me the same story she told the coroner at Jimi’s inquest and subsequently all the other journalists and writers who over the past 20 years had tried to uncover what happened.

The essence of her story was this. Jimi was booked into the Cumberland Hotel near Marble Arch, but was actually saying with Monika in the basement flat of the Samarkand Hotel about 10 minutes drive away. During the afternoon of 17th September, they went with some people they’d just met to a flat near Baker Street. They returned to the Samarkand around 8.30pm and stayed there until the early hours of the morning when Jimi asked to be driven to another flat not far from the Cumberland Hotel in order to tell the perennially jealous Devon Wilson, who had flown in with Alan Douglas and his wife, that he was now engaged to be married. Monika dropped Jimi off, came back about 30 minutes later and they returned to the Samarkand about 3am. They talked, Monika made Jimi a sandwich. They got into bed about 6am, Monika took a sleeping pill and fell asleep about a hour later. Jimi was still awake and she didn’t see him take any pills. She said she woke at 10am, saw Jimi was asleep and she went out to get some cigarettes. When she came back about 15 minutes later, she noticed Jimi had been sick and she couldn’t wake him up.

Not knowing who Jimi’s doctor was, she made some phone calls to Jimi’s friends, eventually reaching Eric Burdon who told her to call an ambulance. That was 11.18am. It arrived nine minutes later. She said that the ambulance drivers were very relaxed, no blue lights, and she travelled with Jimi in the ambulance to St Mary Abbott’s Hospital. Monika waited around and was eventually told by a nurse that Jimi was dead. The main thrust of her story was to blame the medical staff for his death, in particular the ambulance drivers, who she said had Jimi upright all the time.

I knew what Monika would say and so I had little cause to question any of it – until I went down to the hospital. I checked the hospital admissions register for that day, 18th August 1970, but could find no record of Jimi’s admission. I questioned Walter Price, a hospital porter who had been on duty that day. “Jimi was never admitted,” he told me. “He was taken straight to the morgue.”

What he said was not entirely accurate, but doubt now crept in about Monika’s story. Checking back on her past statements, the bare bones of her story remained, but her actions and the timings altered with each telling. The discovery of those inconsistencies began a chain of events that ended not only in a much clearer picture of what happened, but a demolition of Monika’s story. She vainly fought back with threats of legal action against anybody – including me – who doubted her word.

As Tappy makes clear in his book, and confirmed by everybody in Jimi’s orbit – he regularly fell in love with ‘the woman of his dreams’, showering her with intimate whisperings and promises of undying love. Maybe sometimes he believed it himself, but mostly Jimi was charming his way to sex. It fell to Monika to be the last woman Jimi would ever woo and she convinced herself that he was sincere about marrying her and setting up home in England.

By common consent, the only woman who Jimi genuinely cared about – and who cared about him without any ulterior motive – was Kathy Etchingham. (“I wish they’d stayed together,” says Tappy. “Jimi might still be alive today.”) Jimi and Kathy lived together with Chas and his wife when Jimi first arrived well before he was famous – and later shared a flat together in Mayfair. And it was Kathy in the early 90s, aided by Mitch Mitchell’s wife Dee, who took on the task of uncovering the circumstances of Jimi’s death.

This feature was originally published in Classic Rock 135, August 2009.
Incredibly neither the ambulance drivers, nor the police who attended the 999 call nor the doctors who did actually went through the motions of trying to revive Jimi in the hospital, were ever called to give evidence. For reasons best known to himself, the Coroner Gavin Thurston, just wanted this done and dusted as quickly as possible. The cause of death was cited as inhalation of vomit caused by barbiturate intoxication and with no evidence of foul play or suicide – Thurston declared an open verdict.

Kathy and Dee tracked down all these people and others besides. They gathered so much new evidence that the Attorney General ordered a police investigation. As it happened, a number of those who were happy to speak privately to Kathy either wanted nothing to do with the police or changed their stories for fear of publicity. So the inquest was not re-opened, but their testimonies stand. And so the story now looks like this.

Monika and Jimi did go the flat of some complete strangers in the afternoon, but Jimi stayed far longer than Monika wanted to, enjoying the attentions of the young women who were there and when they eventually left around 10.40pm, the owner of the flat Phillip Harvey said that Monika went crazy and was screaming and shouting at Jimi all the way out in the street. Later she did take Jimi to a party, but he was there much longer than 30 minutes, probably a good few hours. It was a flat belonging to a businessman with links to Track Records, Peter Cameron. Others present included Devon Wilson, Alan Douglas and his wife Stella. Monika came back to collect Jimi – he told Stella to get rid of her. But Monika kicked up such a stink that he had to leave.

The former Samarkand Hotel as it looks today.
When Eric Burdon asked Monika why she hadn’t called an ambulance, she said that she was scared because there were drugs in the room. So first on the scene was Eric’s roadie Terry Slater who told Kathy that he and Monika cleared out the flat, going across the road to some adjacent gardens where they buried the drugs. Meanwhile the ambulance drivers arrived to find Jimi dead and alone in the room. Following procedure they tried to resuscitate him in the ambulance, but he was clearly gone and this would explain why they were so relaxed and didn’t rush through the streets. Terry said that he and Monica viewed all this from across the street. The doctors at the hospital also tried resuscitation, but they could see it was hopeless. Jimi had been dead for hours.

Every time Monika told the story, critical details changed; the time they went to sleep, when she got up, whether or not she went out for cigarettes and so on. It transpired Jimi had swallowed nine of Monika’s German sleeping tablets, the equivalent of 18 times the recommended dose. And this is what killed him. Maybe she blamed herself for leaving them lying around. Maybe she felt guilty if Jimi had taken all those pills so he could escape from her constant nagging.

Or as she told Terry Slater, maybe she was just scared. Here was a 22 year-old white girl, a stranger in a strange land, from a wealthy background with a very conservative father, caught in a bedroom full of drugs with a world famous black musician. Could it be that on discovering Jimi dead she panicked and fled the hotel, and that all her strange behaviour and inconsistent stories were the product of covering-up this moment of weakness?

The problem was made worse for Monika over the years because she told everybody about not calling the ambulance immediately. So it became the wisdom among fans and other musicians that Jimi died because she delayed.

And where was Mike Jeffery while all this was going on? He was definitely in London on Sunday 13th September to visit Danny Halpern at Track Records. By all accounts he was desperate to find Jimi to discuss an upcoming court case concerning claims that Jimi had signed a deal with PPX Records before he signed with Chas and Mike. Did Mike stay in London? No, said both his assistant Trixie Sullivan and Jim Marron who both maintained Mike was in Majorca when the news came through. However Bob Levine tells a different story. Interviewed by writer John McDermott he said that it took a week after Jimi’s death for Mike to call the New York office pretending that he had only just found out; “but I knew he was lying because I had spoken to people who saw him at a party Track Records had staged in London the night before Hendrix died”. And who were these people? According to Bob the very same people that had been at the flat of Peter Cameron – the man with links to Track Records – where Jimi had been seen that same evening: Devon Wilson and Alan and Stella Douglas. Could this be one and the same party – with Mike arriving and leaving early – and Jimi turning up much later?

As deep as Kathy and Dee were able to dig, there are still two significant and unexplained aspects to Jimi’s death. The first is that he was found fully clothed on top of the bed. Every version of Monika’s story has them going to bed together which by any normal interpretation means getting undressed and pulling back the covers.

The second point is that both the ambulance drivers and the doctor who attended Jimi at the hospital say that Jimi was in a real mess. Dr John Bannister was the surgical registrar on duty that day. When Dr Bannister read my book he wrote to me from Australia: “The very striking memory of this event,” he wrote, “was the considerable amount of alcohol in his larynx and pharynx… I recall vividly the large amounts of red wine that oozed from his stomach and his lungs.”

Yet the toxicology report revealed an alcohol blood level equivalent to about four pints of beer – and in any case, Jimi had an unusually low tolerance to alcohol. Once when he’d had a bit too much, he totally trashed a hotel bedroom. Earlier that month in Sweden, Jimi had swallowed pills, but there was no alcohol involved. However inconsistent her testimony, nothing Monika said suggested that Jimi had drunk a lot of wine, nor had he done so earlier in the evening. And there was no mention of empty wine bottles in the room. So where did it come from?

The open verdict came as a great relief to both Warner Brothers and Mike. If the verdict in any way suggested suicide, foul play or that Jimi had somehow contributed to his own death by reckless behaviour, then the insurance companies would have refused to pay out. In fact while the new police investigation was under way, the BBC tracked down the original insurance investigator who looked into Jimi’s death who confirmed that he had been looking for ways not to pay, but refused to reveal the contents of his files. On the strength of a poem written by Jimi before he died, a very stoned Eric Burdon went on British television to declare that Jimi had committed suicide which brought a stern warning from Warner Brothers to shut up or else.

And if Mike was convinced he’d lose Jimi, as Noel Redding pointed out later, his death was very convenient for Mike’s health and well-being. Tappy says he was able to clear all his debts and moreover, offer Jimi’s father Al, the sole beneficiary of Jimi’s estate, nearly $250,000 for Jimi’s half-share in Electric Lady studios.

There was a curious epilogue involving Monika and Mike. In the immediate aftermath of Jimi’s death, there were plenty of rumours flying around that Mike had been involved. In her book of artwork published in 1995, Monika wrote that even so, when she was in New York at the end of February 1971, she went to see Mike at Electric Lady studio – the man who everybody told her would do anything to buy silence. All they seemed to speak about was the possibility that Mike could become her manager to promote her artwork. She says that she specifically asked Mike to come to her to hotel room to ‘discuss things privately.’ Monika wrote that she resisted Mike’s offers and flew off to Seattle. But why did she seek him out in the first place?

Jimi’s premature death aged 27 was followed in the years to come, by the deaths of other key figures who died before their time. Always battling against heroin addiction, Devon Wilson fell to her death in mysterious circumstances from the Chelsea Hotel in February 1971 while Mike Jeffery died aged 39 in 1973. For Noel and Mitch, it was always a case of ‘what do you after playing in the Jimi Hendrix Experience?’ The answer was ‘not much’ and although Mitch fared better than Noel, both drank heavily as they slipped rapidly into obscurity. Noel died aged 57 in May 2003, Mitch followed in 2009 aged 61. Chas Chandler was also only 57 when he succumbed to a heart attack in July 1996, the same fate which later struck down Hendrix historian Tony Brown also in his fifties, who more fully documented the events leading up to Jimi’s death.

And what of Monika? As her story was crumbling in the face of new evidence, she made one accusation too many and Kathy Etchingham obtained a court order banning her from telling any more lies to reporters about Kathy and her investigation. Monika breached the order and had to face Kathy in open court. She was found guilty of contempt of court on Wednesday April 3, 1996. Always regarded as mentality quite frail – and liable for £30,000 in costs – two days later she committed suicide, her body found in a fume-filled Mercedes at her home in Seaford where I’d interviewed her seven years before. (There was no suicide note and predictably some – including her partner, guitarist Uli Jon Roth – speculated that she too was murdered.)

There may well be somebody out there who knows exactly what happened to Jimi Hendrix between 4am and 8am on Thursday 18th September 1970. And although the inquest was not re-opened, the case remains open. There is no statute of limitations on murder.


http://www.classicrockmagazine.com/features/the-mysterious-death-of-jimi-hendrix/

Was Jimi Hendrix’s death a case of insurance fraud?
Posted on November 12, 2013 by Josh Weed
Forty-three years after his death, Jimi Hendrix is still considered one of the most influential guitarists in the history of rock and roll. Despite a short career of only four years, he permanently changed the landscape, ushering in the age of psychedelia and paving the way for heavy metal. He redefined the electric guitar, pioneering its use as a source for sound, to be transformed by wah pedals, whammy bars, and the previously undesirable effects of distortion and feedback. The result was something that couldn’t help but get a reaction. It was the sound of hard earned technical proficiency, raw passion, and a bomb going off next to your head. Whether or not you’re a fan of his sound, he expanded the range of what was thought possible at the time, and the ripples are still being felt today. Unknowingly, he spawned generations of future guitarists who would agonize for years over their attempts to emulate his playing. His technicality has since been surpassed by many of them, but there remains something about his distinctive, quirky sound that is almost impossible to imitate. However, the holy grail of his guitar tone is not the only thing that people are still trying to figure out. The circumstances surrounding his untimely death are shrouded in mystery. Gaps in knowledge and contradictory accounts of what happened on the night of his death have generated much speculation, but one conspiracy theory tends to get the most attention. It is often rumored that Hendrix was murdered by his debt-ridden manager, Michael Jeffrey, who wanted to cash in his £1.2million life insurance. Is this really justified by the evidence?

Unreliable evidence

Eyewitness testimony is notoriously unreliable. Unfortunately, as is the case with most historical events, circumstantial evidence like witness testimony makes up the bulk of the evidence, and the typical pattern of separate accounts diverging over time until they are virtually unrecognizable is glaringly evident. The fact is, no matter how certain people are that they are accurately recounting the past, there is no way to know whether they truly are without examining more objective, static recordings of the past itself. I­n fact, it turns out that the degree of confidence a person feels about how accurate a memory is has very little correlation to how accurate it really is.(1) People come away from dramatic events with memories that seem like vivid, static snapshots, claiming to know exactly what they were doing when it happened, who they were with, and where they were. But it simply doesn’t work that way. Experiments have tested people’s memory after a tragedy, and then again months and years later. The subjects are confident that their memories are completely accurate, but they aren’t. Huge details have been added and replaced by confabulated ones, and it is all beyond the test subject’s awareness.(2) Therefor, I don’t think we should take accounts of the event from long after it occurred too seriously. Although it is possible that, years later, someone could have remembered something crucial that had slipped their mind, or found the courage to let go of a dark secret, it would be an exception to the rule. If there is no direct evidence provided, there is no way to distinguish these accounts from the inaccurate ones. In a few cases, it’s even possible that a newly recounted memory was completely fabricated for publicity. For all of these reasons, I take individual testimonies with a grain of salt. That being said, when you have a collection of testimonies this big, enough of them may agree with each other strongly enough that they can rule out another testimony that opposes them, or corroborate one inference over another. If they do agree with each other, it shouldn’t be ignored.

The conspiracy theory and it’s claims

Here’s how the theory goes: Hendrix was legally bound to Jeffery in an increasingly abusive professional relationship. Jeffrey was manipulative and untrustworthy, coercing the band into non-stop touring, and siphoning off most of the money they made into an offshore company in the Bahamas called Yameta, never to be seen again. People were terrified of confronting him, as it was rumored that he had ties to MI6, the FBI, and the Mafia. In 1969, Hendrix claimed to have been abducted, imprisoned for days, and then rescued by Jeffery, and he believed that it was all just an elaborate ploy to make him feel dependent on Jeffrey. In 1970, the contract between Hendrix and Jeffery was up for renewal. When Jeffery got word that Hendrix was talking about firing him, he took out a £1.2million pound insurance policy on Hendrix’s life and then murdered him by forcing sleeping pills and red wine down his throat.(3)

There are different permutations of this theory. However, there are three central claims that serve as linchpins. The first claim is that Jeffrey took out an insurance policy on Hendrix’s life shortly before he died. Even if it were true, it wouldn’t constitute proof that Jeffrey murdered Hendrix; insurance policies are a standard practice in the music industry. It would mean that Jeffrey stood to gain from Hendrix’s death, but assuming a priori that this makes him guilty is as logically unsound as assuming that a murdered parent was killed by their only child, simply because the child is in the parents’ will. On the other hand, if it isn’t true that Jeffrey took out the insurance policy, the theory falls flat on its face. So, did Jeffrey take out a £1.2 million insurance policy on Jimi’s life? Those who maintain that Jeffrey killed Hendrix take this absolutely for granted. However, there appears to be only one record in the public domain that references an insurance policy on Hendrix, an old magazine article from 1968, in which co-manager Chas Chandler is quoted as saying, “you wouldn’t believe it, but we’ve got Jimi insured for a million dollars!”(4) However, it’s not clear who exactly Chandler was referring to, and Bob Levine, Jimi’s US manager and business partner of Jeffery’s, denies that Jeffery ever took out insurance on Hendrix.(5) The evidence is inconclusive, leaning towards Jeffrey never having taken out the insurance. The second claim is that the contract between Hendrix and Jeffery was going to expire in 1970. The only material I could find on this subject states that the contract expired in 1972, but I couldn’t verify it.(6) Inconclusive once again. The third claim is that Hendrix was discovered with an impossibly huge amount of red wine in his hair, lungs, and stomach. This idea appears to originate from interviews with John Bannister, who was one of the doctors that treated Hendrix at the now closed St Mary Abbott’s Hospital. In various interviews, Bannister has claimed that he spent over half an hour extracting wine from Hendrix’s body. “The amount of wine that was over him was just extraordinary. Not only was it saturated right through his hair and shirt but his lungs and stomach were absolutely full of wine,” he said.(7) Of all the hospital personnel who dealt with Hendrix that night, Dr. Bannister is the only person who claims to have seen any red wine in or on the body. Ambulance attendants Jones and Suau didn’t see any red wine when they arrived at the flat, and the man who conducted the post mortem of the body, Dr. Seifert, didn’t notice any signs of alcohol.(8) Strangely, Dr. Bannister said that he remembered being perplexed by the length of the body, claiming that it was hanging over the table “by about 10 inches.” This is suspicious because Hendrix was only 5’11; he wasn’t short, but by no means was he a giant. It seems plausible that Dr. Bannister was confusing Hendrix with another patient. He didn’t know who Hendrix was at the time, so there’s no reason for Hendrix to have been more memorable to him than any of the other patients he treated at the time. That’s not the only alternative explanation though. Allegedly, Monika Dannemann (Hendrix’s girlfriend at the time of his death) claimed in an interview that the last thing she saw Hendrix drink was cola.(9) It’s possible that Dr. Bannister mistook the dark, cola-stained gastric contents for red wine.

Origin of the theory

So where does this theory, which seems to be getting more implausible by the minute, originate? In 2009, Former Hendrix roadie, James Tappy Wright, claimed in his 2009 autobiography, Rock Roadie, that Jeffery drunkenly confessed in 1971 to murdering Hendrix. According to Wright, Jeffery told him that—with help from a couple of other people—he had stuffed pills into Hendrix’s mouth and poured a few bottles of red wine deep into his windpipe. Jeffery allegedly said: “I had to do it. Jimi was worth much more to me dead than alive. That son of a bitch was going to leave me. If I lost him, I’d lose everything.”(10) However, one thing that both sides of the debate seem to agree on is that Jeffery was in Majorca, Spain, when Hendrix died in London. I don’t know whether this is true. If it is, we are left with two possibilities:

1. Jeffery hired someone else to do it and skipped town.

2. Jeffery was innocent.

There is a fairly unforgivable problem with the first one. If Jeffery wasn’t in London, then Wright’s claim is false, because it requires Jeffery’s presence at the murder. However, Wright’s claim is the very origin of the theory. If it is false, the theory is completely baseless—without even a sensational claim made by someone trying to sell a book to stand on. By this logic, if it could be proven that Jeffery was in Spain that night, the theory would be proven false by proxy.

If, despite all of that, you still put stock in Wright’s claim, you have no reason not to attach equal validity to a claim made by Bob Levine. Levine claimed that Wright confessed to him that he fabricated the story to give his book a selling point: “I told Tappy, ‘What are you doing making up this story? So you want to sell books – why do you have to print such lies?’ And he said to me, ‘Well, who’s going to challenge me? Everybody’s dead, everybody’s gone. Chas Chandler, Michael Jeffrey, Mitch Mitchell, Noel Redding…they’re all gone. Nobody can challenge what I write.”(5) Do I need to point out how ironic that is?

Just to be absolutely clear, it’s not my intent to tell you that the theory is false. Most of its claims aren’t falsifiable, because the past is just that, the past. All I can justifiably do is point to the fact that they are based off of suspicion rather than evidence. To say with 100% confidence that they are false would be to make the same critical mistake that the people making them are: 100% confidence on the basis of incomplete evidence. Proponents of the theory take it’s claims as gospel, but they appear to be moot. It would be arrogant to dismiss them entirely, because there simply isn’t enough evidence. Or would it? It depends on whether you agree with Christopher Hitchens when he said, “that which is presented without evidence can be dismissed without evidence.” What clearly is arrogant is to presume that they are valid, extrapolate from them wildly, and then scoff at someone for asking you to go back and prove your own premise…Welcome to the wacky world of internet conspiracy sleuths.

What I want to do now is take a look at what solid evidence there is, and try to figure out what the simplest explanation is. It must be consonant with the evidence and not require a load of unproven assumptions. How about the possibility that Hendrix simply fell victim to an excessive lifestyle, like so many others in his line of work?

The post mortem examination

In her original testimony, Monika Dannemann claimed that Hendrix had taken nine of her prescribed Vesparax sleeping pills, 18 times the recommended dose.(11) This is supported by the results of Hendrix’s post mortem examination. The doctor who conducted the examination, Robert Donald Teare, reported that blood tests revealed a mixture of barbiturates consistent with those from Vesparax.(12) Interestingly, professor Teare stated that the dose was “too low to be fatal.” However, in the mid-1990s, one of Teare’s former students re-examined the report, concluding that the barbiturate level in Hendrix’s blood was above the toxic level. This degree of barbiturate intoxication inhibits the cough reflex, meaning that it would have been difficult for him to breathe during vomiting.(13)

Even if he hadn’t started vomiting, the dose was 3 ½ times the highest therapeutic level, a dose toxic enough to be deadly without fairly immediate treatment for barbiturate intoxication. Also, Teare didn’t take into account the interaction that would have taken place between the barbiturates and the alcohol in Jimi’s system. Back then, people weren’t aware of how dangerous it is to mix barbiturates and alcohol. Both depress the central nervous system, consequently, combining the two results in a greatly decreased amount of activity in the nervous system, which can kill you.(14) But Jimi didn’t just make the mistake of mixing the two, he made the mistake of having very high levels of both in his system at once. In the post mortem, it was estimated that his “blood-alcohol level was probably at 100 mgs at the time when he took the Vesparax.”(15) If that’s true, by today’s standards he was legally intoxicated when he took the pills, and would probably have died that night with or without inhaling his own vomit.

If Jimi simply overdosed, the next logical question to ask is, did he do it on purpose? You can make a good case either way.

The case for suicide

The months leading up to Jimi’s death were a dark time in his life. He was being pressured constantly by fellow musicians, his manager, and the record company, all of whom had different ideas of what his direction should be, and he was embroiled in enough legal disputes to compromise his financial security for years. By the time he reached the European leg of his tour, he was worn out by a relentless string of gigs, chronic fatigue, a nasty cold, disillusionment with the industry, and emotional turmoil over personal relationships. It is said that he stopped showing up for sound checks, and during a performance in Aarhus, he walked off the stage after three songs, telling the audience bleakly: “I’ve been dead a long time.” It was obvious that he was in no shape for touring. His last performance was an informal jam with Eric Burdon’s band, War, in which he played uncharacteristically quietly, refraining from the trademark stage moves that had helped make him famous.(16) It’s impossible to know exactly what his state of mind was. Did he kill himself? Who knows. There is, however, one solid piece of evidence that supports the idea–without proving it outright. Just a few hours before Jimi’s death, he wrote a poem that can very easily be construed as a suicide note. The last stanza reads, “the story of life is quicker than the wink of an eye, the story of love is hello and goodbye. Until we meet again.”(17) Eric Burdon had recently discussed death and suicide with Jimi, and after reading the poem he declared to the press that he believed Jimi had killed himself.(18) He has since changed his mind, but perhaps he was on to something.

The case for accidental overdose

Superficially, popping 9 sleeping pills does seem like something that you would only do if you were intent on killing yourself. However, there are many things that this doesn’t take into account.

1. Hendrix was known for taking drugs very recklessly.(19) His reputation as a drug user has caused those who knew to casually dismiss the idea that a mere barbiturate overdose could have taken him down. On the contrary, I think that it makes it much more likely that he accidentally overdosed.

2. The product leaflet may have been printed only in German, in which case he wouldn’t have been able to read what the recommended dose was.

3. A common side effect of barbiturates like Vesparax is amnesia. It’s possible that Jimi forgot that he took a dose, so re-dosed, then forget he re-dosed and re-dose again until he eventually overdosed. In toxicology, this tendency is called “automatism.” Back in the days when barbiturates were still common, automatism was thought to have claimed many people’s lives, notably Judy Garland. However, whether automatism is a real phenomenon seems to be disputed within the medical literature.

Conclusion

For a glamorous rock star, being assassinated is a sexy way to go. Accidental or intentional barbiturate overdose, leading to asphyxiation on vomit, is not. It’s bleak and pointless–not befitting of a rock star. Thankfully, there are enough conflicting accounts, unsubstantiated rumors, and blog rants for you to piece together a variety of narratives that aren’t so bleak and pointless. If you’re in the mood for a web of intrigue, you’re in luck: all the ingredients are there for you to play a game of connect the dots ending with Hendrix getting killed by his manager. That is, if you’re planning on reasoning your way backwards and relying upon dubious anecdotes. If you’re planning on a more intellectually honest look at Hendrix’s death, prepare to be disappointed. When you use Occam’s razor to cut away all of its unproven assumptions, it turns out that the theory is artificially suspended by them, and comes crashing to the ground. In my opinion, the most likely scenario is that Hendrix accidentally overdosed, but I can’t say for sure. There’s just not enough evidence. To dismiss all other possibilities, come to a rock solid conclusion, and insult those who disagree is incredibly arrogant. But this kind of behavior dominates the online discourse over controversial matters where the evidence is lacking. Perhaps it is an unfortunate commentary on human nature, or perhaps people who behave like that are represented disproportionately in online discussions. For humanity’s sake, I hope the latter is true, but I’m inclined to think that it’s really a little bit of both.


https://skeptoid.com/blog/2013/11/12/was-jimi-hendrixs-death-a-case-of-insurance-fraud-2/

Doctor on duty the night Jimi Hendrix died adds weight to murder theory
By SIMON CABLE
UPDATED: 21:32 GMT, 20 July 2009

Was Jimi Hendrix murdered? A doctor has added weight to the theory
A doctor who battled to save Jimi Hendrix's life on the night he died has added weight to allegations that the rock legend was murdered.
Australian John Bannister said it was 'plausible' that Hendrix was killed 39 years ago by having red wine and sleeping pills forced down his throat.
A new book by James 'Tappy' Wright, a former road manager for Hendrix, suggests he was killed on the orders of his penniless manager Mike Jeffrey, who wanted to cash in his £1.2million life insurance.
Wright claims a gang broke into the London hotel room where the 27-year-old singer and guitarist was staying with his German girlfriend Monika Dannemann on the night of September 18, 1970, and fed him wine until he drowned.
Mr Bannister, 67, who was on duty at St Mary Abbots hospital in Kensington when Hendrix was brought in, said Wright's account was possible because of the large volume of wine involved.
'The amount of wine that was over him was just extraordinary,' he said at his home in Sydney. 'Not only was it saturated right through his hair and shirt but his lungs and stomach were absolutely full of wine. I have never seen so much wine.
Jimi Hendrix Monika Dannemann     +3
Couple: Jimi was with his girlfriend Monika Dannemann (left) on the night he died
'We had a sucker that you put down into his trachea, the entrance to his lungs and to the whole of the back of his throat.
'We kept sucking and it kept surging and surging. He had already vomited up masses of red wine and I would have thought there was half a bottle of wine in his hair. He had really drowned in a massive amount of red wine.
'When you are in casualty, one always tries very hard to resuscitate people. There's always a hope. We worked very hard for about half an hour but there was no response at all. It really was an exercise in futility.
'Somebody said to me, "You know who that was? That was Jimi Hendrix" and of course I said, "Who's Jimi Hendrix?"'

The widely-held belief is that Hendrix choked on his own vomit after a drugs overdose.
Mr Bannister left London in 1972 and practised as an orthopaedic surgeon in Australia until 1992, when he was struck off in New South Wales for fraudulent conduct.
Monika Dannemann, an ice-skating instructor, who was with Hendrix on the night he died, committed suicide in 1996.
She always maintained he was alive when the ambulance arrived, but this has been vehemently denied by authorities.
Wright claims in his book, Rock Roadie, which was published last month, that Mike Jeffrey admitted murdering Hendrix a month before he was killed in a plane crash in 1973.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1201016/Doctor-duty-night-Jimi-Hendrix-died-adds-weight-murder-theory.html






Edited by Svetonio - April 07 2014 at 03:01
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 01:50

The Kübler-Ross model, commonly known as the five stages of grief, is a theory first introduced by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book, On Death and Dying. The popular but largely untested theory describes in five distinct stages how people deal with grief and tragedy. Such events might include being diagnosed with a terminal illness or enduring a catastrophic loss.

The five stages are:

  1. denial
  2. anger
  3. bargaining
  4. depression
  5. acceptance

The theory holds that the stages are a part of the framework that helps people learn to live without what they lost. Lay people and practitioners consider the stages as tools to help frame and identify what a person who's suffered a loss may be feeling. The theory holds that the stages are not stops on a linear time line of grief. The theory also states that not everyone goes through all of the stages, nor in a prescribed order. In addition to the five-stages theory, Kübler-Ross has been credited with bringing mainstream awareness to the sensitivity required for better treatment of people who are dealing with a fatal disease



If you cannot be wise, pretend to be someone who is wise and then just behave like they would - Neil Gaiman
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Svetonio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 01:59
I think that Keith Moon was murdered too; but, as that's my own theory, I do not know if it's good to express it here.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Moogtron III Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 03:53
There's a theory about Brian Jones' death too, that he was murdered.
That sort of stories keeps coming up.
Well, you never know, but it seems unlikely to me. 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Blacksword Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 04:08
Jim Morrison was murdered by the KGB. He had been an undercover Soviet agent who was part of a Kremlin initiative to undermine the moral fibre of America's youth. In 1969 he became uneasy with this role, and also found it difficult to maintain the pretence that he was a habitual drunk and cocaine addict, as had been the instructions of his Soviet handlers. He had an epiphany after an 'unspecified UFO encounter' in Montana and became an outspoken anti communist writer working under the pseudonym Patrick Buchannon. For his treachery he was drowned in a bath tub in a paris Hotel by a hooker, who he picked up on a night out, who turned out to be a KGB 'hitman' who had been tailing him since 1967. An exhibition of his poetry two years later in Paris was cancelled at the last minute amid rumours that it had all been written by the Soviet premiers 17 year old daughter, herself a secret acid freak.

It's also believed that Sid Vicious was killed by Labour party insiders in 1978 after having declared his intention to join the party and modernise it from the inside out to embrace neo-liberal economics and to dismantle the trade unions. He had circulated a document among some party sympathisers in late 1977 entitled "New Labour. A new beginning"




Ultimately bored by endless ecstasy!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote sleeper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 05:17
Bloody tin-foil hat wearing conspirators.
Spending more than I should on Prog since 2005

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Post Options Post Options   Quote Dean Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 05:24


If you cannot be wise, pretend to be someone who is wise and then just behave like they would - Neil Gaiman
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ExittheLemming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 05:38
Have you seen Courtney Love? No wonder he topped himself.

The media's greatest fear: a celebrity dies of natural causes Shocked


Edited by ExittheLemming - April 06 2014 at 05:39
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ExittheLemming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 05:40
Originally posted by Svetonio

I think that Keith Moon was murdered too; but, as that's my own theory, I do not know if it's good to express it here.


Too late now methinks....Ermm
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 05:43
John Bonham technically died of the same thing Jimi did, which was an excess of alcohol that he then choked on (he'd also ingested a lot of food -  no Spinal Tap jokes please).   But in Bonzo's case, irregardless of any life insurance that may've been taken out on him, the potential lost revenue of no more Led Zeppelin for the entire industry far outweighed any insurance claim.   But he died too.

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Post Options Post Options   Quote ExittheLemming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 06:00
I'm loathe to dredge up another of these probably baseless conspiracy tales but doesn't Jaco Pastorious' widow claim he was murdered?
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Post Options Post Options   Quote akamaisondufromage Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 06:10
I think Elvis was murdered by a particularly vengeful toilet seat.  Which had quite honestly had enough.
Help me I'm falling!
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Atavachron Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 06:12
 ^ good stuff
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Post Options Post Options   Quote chopper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 06:32
Originally posted by ExittheLemming

I'm loathe to dredge up another of these probably baseless conspiracy tales but doesn't Jaco Pastorious' widow claim he was murdered?

That's pretty much true. although the guy was only convicted of manslaughter.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Equality 7-2521 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 06:36
Why is every new thread here a conspiracy topic nowadays?
"One had to be a Newton to notice that the moon is falling, when everyone sees that it doesn't fall. "
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Stool Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 06:38
Originally posted by Equality 7-2521

Why is every new thread here a conspiracy topic nowadays?
It's a conspiracy against conspiracy theorists
rotten hound of the burnie crew
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Post Options Post Options   Quote ExittheLemming Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 06:40
Svetonio must be the only guy to have faked his own life?Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Quote Horizons Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 06 2014 at 10:18
Everyone is murdered, that's the only believable way to die. 
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