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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 05 2015 at 20:09
*^ well Steve I haven't got around to spinning the new Wilson. Boy, if you feel this new effort is perhaps better than his previous (the Raven) than I better get this one!! ;)

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 17 2015 at 17:30
Oh well, having just witnessed the brave Arsenal go out of the Champions League, I thought I would cheer myself up with a quick post in this here blog.

For those of you unfamiliar with European sport, this time of year is important as the rugby Six Nations Championship is being played out. In my part of Wales, it is akin amongst blokes of a certain vintage to a religious experience. Of course, Wales playing first up on Saturday, in a fantastic game, followed by England, is naturally an occasion in which a fair amount of ale is consumed. It has to be done, kind of de rigeur!

So, I returned home to put on the Lazland deck ever so slightly inebriated (we won ), and, in that sort of state, was in the mood for classic Prog.

So, a loud dose of Selling England went on first. I then put on one of my favourite DVD's, and by far the best Yes live gig I have on any format. I do not have them all, but I have got most of them. The DVD is the 35th anniversary tour, Songs From Tsongas. I put the whole thing on, but my favourite passage is the acoustic session, where the whole band really look as if they are genuinely enjoying themselves. Even Howe threatens to break into some form of smile at one stage, miserable old so and so....

The old "is Yes any good without Jon Anderson?"is a fairly well worn question on this and other forums. Looking at this performance, though, I was simply struck at what an exuberant performer he is, and how his clear joy of life and spirituality is such a joy to behold, and how infectious it is in both band and audience. The rendition of Ritual is a good case in point. It is, by far, the best live version they recorded, and it has an energy and tightness that utterly belies the age of the band.

Talking of which, I do genuinely believe that they should have called the interminable tours to an end after this one, and closed on a high, because they were damned good. Instead, we now have a fossilised sort of tribute band, which is a huge shame to me.

Yes were my first Prog band. Their music has brought me untold joy. I have to say, though, that they are not the same without their talisman. Fly from Here was a decent enough record, but Benoit obviously struggled like hell live. The last album, Heaven and Earth, which I am yet to review, is, to these ears, simply average, a statement from a band who no longer have the desire to break any boundaries whatsoever. Fact....most of them are too old to do so, and, basically, they are simply adding to the pension and inheritance pools. Nothing wrong in that intrinsically, but a shame I think.

I have said on a number of occasions that I get the greatest thrill from listening to new music, especially new music which is interesting. I still get the thrill of excitement listening to Ritual, And You & I, and all the rest. It is a fantastic trip back to my wonderful younger years, when such music was still damned exciting and vibrant, relevant. I get really annoyed when people state their wish to see Genesis reform to play The Lamb live. Gabriel is now an old man, 65 for heaven's sake. Why would he want to perform what was, in essence, a horny young man's statement of changing the world? Why would we want to see him do this?

Now, though? As with all of us, the younger generation are making their mark, and putting down their imprint on the genre. Good luck to them too. Now, I really must get round to catching up on reviews, especially a certain Mr Wilson's new effort. A work of genius, my friends. It is exciting, vibrant, and relevant. Wasn't I just talking about a band who did that once?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Meltdowner Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 17 2015 at 18:12
I saw part of that concert on Youtube the other day, it's a great one. From what I saw, I especially liked South Side, with that cool duel between Howe and Wakeman Clap I saw a copy of it on the local store, I should probably get it Smile

I would really like to see them live even without Anderson, it's certainly not as great as their 70's performances but it would be a glimpse of their past. At least Squire, Howe and White are still part of the band Ermm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote odinalcatraz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 21 2015 at 21:19
Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

On a Lazland music cheerful note, given that this thread has been reborn, so to speak, I posted my review of the Corvus Stone II album this afternoon whilst on a return train journey from a tax court case I am involved in.

As I indicated in my review, I found the whole business of overly and ridiculously supportive, and manipulative, reviews a total pain, and said so in another thread.

Colin Tench contacted me, and his decency persuaded me to accept the offer of doing a review.

I am glad I did. It is a great listen, and thoroughly deserves our attention and support.

I tell you what, though. What struck me more than anything was Colin's decency and honesty.

He hated the manipulative reviews more than us old PA sweats, and took positive steps to eradicate them. He wanted honest reviews, and, looking at collab reviews, I think he got them.

He sent me a lovely PM tonight, which I really appreciated.

There is a lesson in all this. The community we have here is, largely, a positive, loving one. Our opinions are valued and respected when we express them honestly, which is the way it should be.

Colin and his cohorts have produced a labour of love. I sincerely hope that the honest supportive reviews they got will help them at least fund a superb follow-up.


Tongue
I only just saw this Laz!! Thank you. This was a hell of a thing to read and really made me happy.
Hopefully most people here now realise that I hold you guys in very high esteem and the balanced reactions to what we do have made us very proud. Most of the band are very quiet but I can speak for them all when I say thank you.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2015 at 12:45
This week's blog is dedicated to reminiscence. There is not a great deal to report on the music front itself, with a mix of new Wilson, Sylvan, IQ, and Luna Rossa mingled with classic Oldfield and Gabriel live DVD's. The Tubular Bells II and III live sets are amongst the best live sets I have, and are thoroughly recommended to fans of Mike who do not have them.

Anyhow, reminiscing. There is a thread on the site dedicated to people's feelings and thoughts about Prog magazine, formerly Classic Rock Presents Prog. The feedback from this thread is, it is fair to say, mainly negative. My take on this is that the website we use, and love, is one for progressive rock hard nuts, hardcore fans to whom, in many instances, the more obscure the band, or music, the better, and this site caters for this extremely well. You cannot, however, possibly hope to make a profit from a magazine promoting on the front cover, or main articles inside, stuff and people who the majority of its target audience has never heard of. The obscure stuff has to be done a little bit more subtly than that, and, by and large, I personally think the magazine does a good job of striking the right balance. In addition, my local newsagent stocks it for me specially, and I like to support local small businesses.

Anyhow, I got the latest edition on Monday, and seeing the front cover took me instantly into full blown reminiscence mood. Marillion. Misplaced Childhood, the 30th anniversary celebration.

Misplaced Childhood, a brilliant album utterly full of very stark, and sometimes very violent, references to anger and rage against the system, ex-girlfriends, drugs, heroes, is 30 years old this year. Blimey, I thought, I was only 20 bloody years old when I first got this, and played it in my flat, speakers blaring out the rage and anger, me singing along at the top of my voice, and sod the neighbours!

Fish himself was only 26/27 years old, and the rest of the band of that sort of age, in other words young men. Steven Rothery and Mark Kelly still had heads full of hair. Trewavas and Moseley have aged rather well, but the starkest thing looking at the photos of the band at the time is just how much Fish has aged in these 30 years. That rock 'n roll lifestyle.....takes it out of a chap!😉

Of course, as those who know me well will recognise, I am a bigger Hogarth era fan of the band than Fish era. However, that is not to denigrate that time, or Fish, in any way, shape, or form. It was a quite remarkable achievement to get a number one album and hit singles from a pure concept piece in the post-punk era, phenomenal really. I gave the album five stars when I reviewed it a few years ago, and it still stands up incredibly well as a piece of work.

However, I was glad to read that they will not be getting back together to play it live in a special concert, or tour. Rothery explained that they were not prepared to play different chords in order to accommodate the damage the years, booze, and fags have done to Fish's voice. Actually, I suspect that the real reason is that the band feel a genuine and heartfelt love of Steve Hogarth, and would not be prepared to cross that.

Whatever the reason, I am glad it is not going ahead. I went to Milton Keynes Bowl to see the album performed in its entirety at The Garden Party, where Jethro Tull were the special guests. It was a fantastic day, and I have many fond memories of this, and seeing the band at The Marquee as a spotty 17 year old for the first time. They remain to this day my favourite band.

So, why would I not want to see it just one last time? Why not take myself back to that fun, if extremely immature, 20 year old?

Because it would not be the same. Because I am no longer 20, I am 50. I actually have worked pretty hard to get used to the fact that I am nearer 70 than 30, and getting comfortable with that person. The band would not be the same, because they, too, are older. I hate seeing The Who performing My Generation, hoping they die before they get old. Damned farcical...they didn't, and they have earned untold wealth since banging out the rebelliousness of youth. More than anything else, Marillion in 2015 are a band who released the sublime Sounds That Can't Be Made a couple of years ago. Gaza was an extremely thought provoking, and controversial, piece about a desperate situation from a child's perspective. Sky Above The Rain makes me cry, because there is stark beauty in the story of a relationship in crisis.

That is where this great band are now. I am looking forward to the next album, and instalment of a marvellous career, because the statement will be just as relevant to me at 50-odd, as Misplaced Childhood was to me at 20. I want something that is relevant to me now, that is alive, and not merely rehashed nostalgia for the sake of a few bucks.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2015 at 12:47
Originally posted by odinalcatraz odinalcatraz wrote:

Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

On a Lazland music cheerful note, given that this thread has been reborn, so to speak, I posted my review of the Corvus Stone II album this afternoon whilst on a return train journey from a tax court case I am involved in.

As I indicated in my review, I found the whole business of overly and ridiculously supportive, and manipulative, reviews a total pain, and said so in another thread.

Colin Tench contacted me, and his decency persuaded me to accept the offer of doing a review.

I am glad I did. It is a great listen, and thoroughly deserves our attention and support.

I tell you what, though. What struck me more than anything was Colin's decency and honesty.

He hated the manipulative reviews more than us old PA sweats, and took positive steps to eradicate them. He wanted honest reviews, and, looking at collab reviews, I think he got them.

He sent me a lovely PM tonight, which I really appreciated.

There is a lesson in all this. The community we have here is, largely, a positive, loving one. Our opinions are valued and respected when we express them honestly, which is the way it should be.

Colin and his cohorts have produced a labour of love. I sincerely hope that the honest supportive reviews they got will help them at least fund a superb follow-up.


Tongue
I only just saw this Laz!! Thank you. This was a hell of a thing to read and really made me happy.
Hopefully most people here now realise that I hold you guys in very high esteem and the balanced reactions to what we do have made us very proud. Most of the band are very quiet but I can speak for them all when I say thank you.



Hey, Colin, thank you very much for this, which is really appreciated.

Only one other thing to say, of course, and that is that a great deal of research has been undertaken, and has demonstrated, beyond all doubt, that a weekly read of the Lazland Blog is essential for health, wealth, and happiness. Do keep up more often, that man!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Dark Elf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2015 at 13:02
Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:


Because it would not be the same. Because I am no longer 20, I am 50. I actually have worked pretty hard to get used to the fact that I am nearer 70 than 30, and getting comfortable with that person. The band would not be the same, because they, too, are older. I hate seeing The Who performing My Generation, hoping they die before they get old. Damned farcical...they didn't, and they have earned untold wealth since banging out the rebelliousness of youth. More than anything else, Marillion in 2015 are a band who released the sublime Sounds That Can't Be Made a couple of years ago. Gaza was an extremely thought provoking, and controversial, piece about a desperate situation from a child's perspective. Sky Above The Rain makes me cry, because there is stark beauty in the story of a relationship in crisis.
 
A sobering thought, for sure, Steve. I was never a big fan of Marillion (to each his own taste in music, which is what makes PA worthwhile), but as I am 55, I had a similar episode of shocked realization when it was announced that the 40th anniversary remix of Minstrel in the Gallery was to be released in May! Forty years? I remember when I was 15 that was Tull's brand new album! Absurd! That makes me...goddamn old! LOL
 
Humorously, I still consider MitG, along with Songs from the Wood, Heavy Horses and Stormwatch, Tull's newer albums. I think my brain must have shut off sometime during the beginning of the 80s.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 24 2015 at 14:48
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:


Because it would not be the same. Because I am no longer 20, I am 50. I actually have worked pretty hard to get used to the fact that I am nearer 70 than 30, and getting comfortable with that person. The band would not be the same, because they, too, are older. I hate seeing The Who performing My Generation, hoping they die before they get old. Damned farcical...they didn't, and they have earned untold wealth since banging out the rebelliousness of youth. More than anything else, Marillion in 2015 are a band who released the sublime Sounds That Can't Be Made a couple of years ago. Gaza was an extremely thought provoking, and controversial, piece about a desperate situation from a child's perspective. Sky Above The Rain makes me cry, because there is stark beauty in the story of a relationship in crisis.

 
A sobering thought, for sure, Steve. I was never a big fan of Marillion (to each his own taste in music, which is what makes PA worthwhile), but as I am 55, I had a similar episode of shocked realization when it was announced that the 40th anniversary remix of Minstrel in the Gallery was to be released in May! Forty years? I remember when I was 15 that was Tull's brand new album! Absurd! That makes me...goddamn old! LOL
 
Humorously, I still consider MitG, along with Songs from the Wood, Heavy Horses and Stormwatch, Tull's newer albums. I think my brain must have shut off sometime during the beginning of the 80s.


Do you know what, Greg, I was thinking exactly the same thing the other week when I put on some Tull. Weird how we have these thoughts, and how our perception of time can be shaped in such a way.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 25 2015 at 12:46
As a slightly seasoned youngster if I may just chime in here and say that, Marillion's Misplaced Childhood should really be untouched. It really is a true classic and even at my young age I can very well see it that way.
I discovered Marillion about 10 years ago today. I remember the first time spinning Misplaced Childhood and the amount of goosebumps and the serge of power I felt was overwhelming. The amazing thing is I still feel all those feelings when I revisit the album. The album is timeless. Both for its age and for the feelings it invoked with me since its first listen into my ears. 30 years? Amazing. That's almost as old as me. Indeed, a special time and a very special album. So very glad I discovered Marillion in general. They are a very important part of my sonic universe.

Prog definitely on. :)

And thank you once again, Steve for a beautiful read. You write so well. I very much enjoy reading your blogs and reviews because I can feel your love and enthusiasm for music in general, which is exactly how I feel; however, your quite a bit better than I at putting thoughts onto paper than I.
A true gift you have Sir! PA is lucky to have you.
Enjoy the day.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gerinski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 25 2015 at 14:35
Nice post Steve Thumbs Up

Fish still did a nice enough rendition of the full Misplaced album in his Return To Childhood concert in 2005 which I have in video (don't know if he did a full tour of it or just the concert I have which was in Holland), but now 10 years later it would probably be another story. And as you say, Marillion have built their own life now with H, the Fish era is too far away, reunions can be nice but they must not feel forced in any way.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: March 25 2015 at 15:15
Thank you both, gentlemen, for your thoughts and responses.

Nicholas, you are right about the album being timeless. It is one of those special pieces which sounds incredibly fresh, even now.

Gerard, I didn't go to see the Misplaced Childhood Fish tour ten years ago, but I did get the CD. I thought it was okay, nothing more. His voice has definitely deteriorated in range the last few years, so, yes, I do think any reunion, or solo effort, would now be a tad forced.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 28 2015 at 16:22
The Lazland Blog has taken a bit of a Spring break lately. There has not been any particular reason for this, aside from the fact that it is Spring, which invariably brings a hive of activity to the Lazland household in terms of jobs to do. With this, an extremely busy time at work, the usual caring stuff, and Lord alone knows what else, my time on the site is limited at the moment to a few quick visits and posts a day.

Note to self. Find time to review and blog! You have a lot to do!

Anyhow, in between the exceptionally good new music which continues to tickle the Lazland fancy, I did, at the weekend, have a little bit of a blowout, both in drinkie terms, and the reason why this blog started in the first place, that to place on record tracks and music which would not usually show on my Progfreak signature playlist.

I have to say that there were no major surprises in the music I chose on Saturday. It was just there. It was, I suppose, ridiculously unadventurous, but, hey, there are times when you simply just want to wallow in nostalgia, or stuff you love. That was where I found myself, and here is what was listened to....

Asia. Heat of the Moment live. Of course, from the debut album, and still a classic of pop/rock/prog lite.

Blackmore's Night. The Village Lantern. Turn off the lights, put on the official video from YouTube, as I did, and pump up the speakers to full effect, and simply marvel at the incredibly intricate musicianship that is demonstrated on this classic traditional track.

Boomtown Rats. Rat Trap. Get your f**king money out!

Dire Straits. Private Investigations Live.I thought the band were brilliant, and I was reminded of this when I listened to Knopfler's impressive new solo work the other day. This is, perhaps, the most progressive track they ever recorded, and is a delight.

Fleetwood Mac. Songbird. Christine live, with just a piano and voice. A touchingly beautiful, bitter sweet, song from a beautiful lady.

Fleetwood Mac. Don't Stop. Because I was now in the mood.

Dexy's Midnight Runners. Geno. It is hard to believe that I was only a teenager when this was released. Staggering! A great piece of music, which thoroughly deserves the word classic attached to it.

Jethro Tull. Heavy Horses, live from the A tour. This version features an incredible electric violin solo from Eddie Jobson. Of all the Tull lineups I saw live, this was, I think, the best.

Jon Anderson. Change we must. I regard this as being amongst the finest pieces of music that Jon ever wrote, and, in terms of the mess the world seems to be in now, the sentiments for a bit of love and peace would not go altogether amiss.

Gary Numan. Are Friends Electric? All together now - this was now approaching the six pint mark.

Genesis. Dukes Travels Live. From Archives Vol. 3, an incredible version of an incredible denouement to an incredible album. Prog at its pompest (is there such a word?).

Edison's Children. The Awakening. The track which has all of Marillion guesting, and is a superb track with which to close an incredibly special album.

Genesis. Fading Lights. From the last Collins album. By now, I am afraid that boozy maudlin had begun to set in.

Marillion. The Sky Above The Rain. Boozy maudlin well on top.

Led Zeppelin. Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You. Boozy maudlin wins the night, followed by sweet oblivion.

Thanks all for continuing to read my musings. It's a grand old life if you don't weaken. And, for God's sake, never weaken!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote odinalcatraz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 28 2015 at 16:41
Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

The Lazland Blog has taken a bit of a Spring break lately. There has not been any particular reason for this, aside from the fact that it is Spring, which invariably brings a hive of activity to the Lazland household in terms of jobs to do. With this, an extremely busy time at work, the usual caring stuff, and Lord alone knows what else, my time on the site is limited at the moment to a few quick visits and posts a day.

Note to self. Find time to review and blog! You have a lot to do!

Anyhow, in between the exceptionally good new music which continues to tickle the Lazland fancy, I did, at the weekend, have a little bit of a blowout, both in drinkie terms, and the reason why this blog started in the first place, that to place on record tracks and music which would not usually show on my Progfreak signature playlist.

I have to say that there were no major surprises in the music I chose on Saturday. It was just there. It was, I suppose, ridiculously unadventurous, but, hey, there are times when you simply just want to wallow in nostalgia, or stuff you love. That was where I found myself, and here is what was listened to....

Asia. Heat of the Moment live. Of course, from the debut album, and still a classic of pop/rock/prog lite.

Blackmore's Night. The Village Lantern. Turn off the lights, put on the official video from YouTube, as I did, and pump up the speakers to full effect, and simply marvel at the incredibly intricate musicianship that is demonstrated on this classic traditional track.

Boomtown Rats. Rat Trap. Get your f**king money out!

Dire Straits. Private Investigations Live.I thought the band were brilliant, and I was reminded of this when I listened to Knopfler's impressive new solo work the other day. This is, perhaps, the most progressive track they ever recorded, and is a delight.

Fleetwood Mac. Songbird. Christine live, with just a piano and voice. A touchingly beautiful, bitter sweet, song from a beautiful lady.

Fleetwood Mac. Don't Stop. Because I was now in the mood.

Dexy's Midnight Runners. Geno. It is hard to believe that I was only a teenager when this was released. Staggering! A great piece of music, which thoroughly deserves the word classic attached to it.

Jethro Tull. Heavy Horses, live from the A tour. This version features an incredible electric violin solo from Eddie Jobson. Of all the Tull lineups I saw live, this was, I think, the best.

Jon Anderson. Change we must. I regard this as being amongst the finest pieces of music that Jon ever wrote, and, in terms of the mess the world seems to be in now, the sentiments for a bit of love and peace would not go altogether amiss.

Gary Numan. Are Friends Electric? All together now - this was now approaching the six pint mark.

Genesis. Dukes Travels Live. From Archives Vol. 3, an incredible version of an incredible denouement to an incredible album. Prog at its pompest (is there such a word?).

Edison's Children. The Awakening. The track which has all of Marillion guesting, and is a superb track with which to close an incredibly special album.

Genesis. Fading Lights. From the last Collins album. By now, I am afraid that boozy maudlin had begun to set in.

Marillion. The Sky Above The Rain. Boozy maudlin well on top.

Led Zeppelin. Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You. Boozy maudlin wins the night, followed by sweet oblivion.

Thanks all for continuing to read my musings. It's a grand old life if you don't weaken. And, for God's sake, never weaken!

I read somewhere that you hold "Amused to Death" in high regard, as do I. Well maybe the summer of 2015 will be the time that that masterpiece will, at last, get it's rightful place in history! Please get me a ticket if you know how to get good seats if he takes it live!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote progbethyname Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 28 2015 at 19:05
Steve. I love Duke's Travels. Pop prog?? I think there is such a thing. I really do.

I mean I have been listening to a lot of OZZY OSBOURNE solo career lately and he has a few songs, namely "I just want you' and I would describe it as a pop metal with a flare of a bit of the old prog with in that track.
I must say, lately I've been appreciating music that is a bit more on the accessible side.
Just yesterday I actually spun ADELE's 21 album and thought it was brilliant.
I guess we all can turn a corner now and then, but my heart mainly lies with in a very large prog den. :)

Some things you can just never escape.

Good day, my chap!

Excellent playlist.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 29 2015 at 06:23
Originally posted by odinalcatraz odinalcatraz wrote:

Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

The Lazland Blog has taken a bit of a Spring break lately. There has not been any particular reason for this, aside from the fact that it is Spring, which invariably brings a hive of activity to the Lazland household in terms of jobs to do. With this, an extremely busy time at work, the usual caring stuff, and Lord alone knows what else, my time on the site is limited at the moment to a few quick visits and posts a day.

Note to self. Find time to review and blog! You have a lot to do!

Anyhow, in between the exceptionally good new music which continues to tickle the Lazland fancy, I did, at the weekend, have a little bit of a blowout, both in drinkie terms, and the reason why this blog started in the first place, that to place on record tracks and music which would not usually show on my Progfreak signature playlist.

I have to say that there were no major surprises in the music I chose on Saturday. It was just there. It was, I suppose, ridiculously unadventurous, but, hey, there are times when you simply just want to wallow in nostalgia, or stuff you love. That was where I found myself, and here is what was listened to....

Asia. Heat of the Moment live. Of course, from the debut album, and still a classic of pop/rock/prog lite.

Blackmore's Night. The Village Lantern. Turn off the lights, put on the official video from YouTube, as I did, and pump up the speakers to full effect, and simply marvel at the incredibly intricate musicianship that is demonstrated on this classic traditional track.

Boomtown Rats. Rat Trap. Get your f**king money out!

Dire Straits. Private Investigations Live.I thought the band were brilliant, and I was reminded of this when I listened to Knopfler's impressive new solo work the other day. This is, perhaps, the most progressive track they ever recorded, and is a delight.

Fleetwood Mac. Songbird. Christine live, with just a piano and voice. A touchingly beautiful, bitter sweet, song from a beautiful lady.

Fleetwood Mac. Don't Stop. Because I was now in the mood.

Dexy's Midnight Runners. Geno. It is hard to believe that I was only a teenager when this was released. Staggering! A great piece of music, which thoroughly deserves the word classic attached to it.

Jethro Tull. Heavy Horses, live from the A tour. This version features an incredible electric violin solo from Eddie Jobson. Of all the Tull lineups I saw live, this was, I think, the best.

Jon Anderson. Change we must. I regard this as being amongst the finest pieces of music that Jon ever wrote, and, in terms of the mess the world seems to be in now, the sentiments for a bit of love and peace would not go altogether amiss.

Gary Numan. Are Friends Electric? All together now - this was now approaching the six pint mark.

Genesis. Dukes Travels Live. From Archives Vol. 3, an incredible version of an incredible denouement to an incredible album. Prog at its pompest (is there such a word?).

Edison's Children. The Awakening. The track which has all of Marillion guesting, and is a superb track with which to close an incredibly special album.

Genesis. Fading Lights. From the last Collins album. By now, I am afraid that boozy maudlin had begun to set in.

Marillion. The Sky Above The Rain. Boozy maudlin well on top.

Led Zeppelin. Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You. Boozy maudlin wins the night, followed by sweet oblivion.

Thanks all for continuing to read my musings. It's a grand old life if you don't weaken. And, for God's sake, never weaken!

I read somewhere that you hold "Amused to Death" in high regard, as do I. Well maybe the summer of 2015 will be the time that that masterpiece will, at last, get it's rightful place in history! Please get me a ticket if you know how to get good seats if he takes it live!


Hi Colin. Thanks for this.

Yes, I truly believe that ATD is Waters' masterpiece, and that includes the quartet of classic Floyd albums so, rightly, beloved on this site and elsewhere.

I think that you have to buy into his worldview in order to both fully appreciate and enjoy it, and, as I think I have said before, as a young man, he had a profound influence on my developing political thinking.

It is not just about the politics and lyrics, though. Some of the musical sequences are the most intricate he ever came up with, and I have to say that I find it difficult to imagine Floyd playing such incredible tracks as Bravery of Being Out of Range and the title track itself. The guitar solo, accompanied by such delicate keyboard work, at the denouement of It's a Miracle still makes the hairs stand up, it is staggering.

I don't think, personally, that we will ever see Waters live again, certainly not on a major tour. How old is he now? 70?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 29 2015 at 06:25
Originally posted by progbethyname progbethyname wrote:

Steve. I love Duke's Travels. Pop prog?? I think there is such a thing. I really do.

I mean I have been listening to a lot of OZZY OSBOURNE solo career lately and he has a few songs, namely "I just want you' and I would describe it as a pop metal with a flare of a bit of the old prog with in that track.
I must say, lately I've been appreciating music that is a bit more on the accessible side.
Just yesterday I actually spun ADELE's 21 album and thought it was brilliant.
I guess we all can turn a corner now and then, but my heart mainly lies with in a very large prog den. :)

Some things you can just never escape.

Good day, my chap!

Excellent playlist.


Nothing wrong with decent pop, prog or otherwise, Nicholas

I thought Ozzy's debut solo album was a classic. I had lost interest by Bark At The Moon, though.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Roj Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2015 at 08:21
A very interesting and entertaining blog Steve, I've always been a silent observer until now Embarrassed.

I'm certainly sharing your view on Mostly Autumn's Dressed In Voices.  That would be very close to my favourite album of 2014.  I didn't think they could top Ghost Moon Orchestra which was my favourite album of theirs up to that point.  However, they might just have done so.  In the passing months since the release of Dressed In Voices I've grown to love the album, it's wonderful.  My only possible criticism being the end of the album is a bit nondescript, following the magnificent title track.

I hope you are still keeping to Doctor's orders and not too many pints of an evening!!

Be well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lazland Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April 30 2015 at 16:20
Originally posted by Roj Roj wrote:

A very interesting and entertaining blog Steve, I've always been a silent observer until now Embarrassed.

I'm certainly sharing your view on Mostly Autumn's Dressed In Voices.  That would be very close to my favourite album of 2014.  I didn't think they could top Ghost Moon Orchestra which was my favourite album of theirs up to that point.  However, they might just have done so.  In the passing months since the release of Dressed In Voices I've grown to love the album, it's wonderful.  My only possible criticism being the end of the album is a bit nondescript, following the magnificent title track.

I hope you are still keeping to Doctor's orders and not too many pints of an evening!!

Be well.


Hey, Rog, thanks for breaking your silence. Welcome aboard!

Dressed in Voices, to these ears, gets better with each and every listen. It has joined that elite group of utterly essential albums I own. Some have described it as a "slow burner". To these ears, it is far more than that. It is an album which shows a maturity and emotional force that simply cannot be digested in one, or a few, listens. It is like a mighty fine bottle, it takes a lot of time, and, yes, patience, before you actually come to realise just how damned special it is.

As for doctor's orders, I actually had some relatively good news this week, in that my blood test results are back to normal, which is a bit of a relief. So, more exercise now my ankle is fully recovered, good diet, and drinking moderately for the past year has clearly helped a lot.

Good Lord, if I carry on like this, I might see the 100th anniversary of In The Court being released in 2069, and coming on here to lecture those whippersnappers on PA just how much they missed by not even being alive when it came out. I'll only be 105


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