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Some 60s/70s Speculative/Science Fiction films

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Topic: Some 60s/70s Speculative/Science Fiction films
Posted By: Logan
Subject: Some 60s/70s Speculative/Science Fiction films
Date Posted: July 17 2018 at 11:49
Something of a response to Icarium's recent sci-fi poll, so I did not duplicate Close Encounters of the Third Kind. These are ones that sprang to mind quickly, and I'm sure that I will regret the omission of many films, but there is so much that I love. It's not in any particular order, and I pan to do do a part two (for instance, I planned to include The Black Hole), and maybe an 80s one.

Feel free to mention any others, but I do still ask that you also mention any that you know and like off the list, and vote in the poll. I've made it multiple choice for any who wish to vote for multiple entries (I tend not to vote in my own polls). It would have been nice to include more of the Planet of the Apes films. You won't find Star Wars because it doesn't resonate with me (well, I do like Yoda), but Star Trek might make an appearance in the second poll.

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).



Replies:
Posted By: Argo2112
Date Posted: July 17 2018 at 13:14
I would have to vote for A Clockwork Orange first but their are a lot of good ones here.
The Andromida Strain, Soylent Green, Planet of the Apes, Colossus: The Forbin Project, Omega Man
( to list a few)


Posted By: someone_else
Date Posted: July 17 2018 at 15:29
I have seen about a handful of these. I favour Soylent Green, though the final part of 2001: A Space Odyssey is superb.

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Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 18 2018 at 10:12
Thanks, Mike and Robert, for the responses.

If I were to choose just one, then my vote would go to A Clockwork Orange (wished I hadn't missed the A in the poll option), but I love all of these (various ones I adore).

Regarding 2001, I find it to be a really beautifully composed film (a favourite of mine since I was a child -- I know many people find the film far too slow). If I were to choose just one scene, then it would be Frank Poole jogging around the centrifuge while shadow-boxing while passing the sleep chambers that resemble sarcophagi. That to me captured the loneliness of such a space mission well, and I found it to be a coldly beautiful scene. Music and image worked so well for me in the film. The framing in the film really appeals to me.

As for Soylent Green, I find overpopulation to be a really interesting theme, and it was quite a popular one in part due to the popularity of the book, The Population Bomb. One I considered listing on that topic (will if I do a second part) is called Z.P.G. (Zero Population Growth).

Almost all of these I saw as a child or teenager, but the most recent discovery (some years ago) of mine was A Boy and His Dog, which is a lesser known film on the list with a young Don Johnson. It was adapted from Harlan Ellison's work (he didn't care for how the film turned out). "Well, I'd certainly say she had marvelous judgment, Albert, if not particularly good taste."

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: Vompatti
Date Posted: July 18 2018 at 10:23
The Tarkovsky ones obviously stand out. Also voted for Alphaville just because I doubt many others will.

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http://nervoushorse.com/" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: Jeffro
Date Posted: July 18 2018 at 10:27
Originally posted by Logan Logan wrote:

 I've made it multiple choice for any who wish to vote for multiple entries

It only let me vote for one option so I went for 

Planet of the Apes
The Andromeda Strain
Logan's Run
Soylent Green
Omega Man


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 18 2018 at 10:33
I don't know if you already know this, but you can only vote for one option at a time. One should be able to vote for one, then after that vote is cast, vote for another etc. If that doesn't work for you, I prefer reading people's posts than looking at the results anyway.

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: Jeffro
Date Posted: July 18 2018 at 11:09
I didn't know that so thank you. I voted for the others


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: July 23 2018 at 23:08
Slaughterhouse Five -> Soylent Green -> The Andromeda Strain...

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https://wytchcrypt.wixsite.com/mutiny-in-jonestown" rel="nofollow - Mutiny in Jonestown : Progressive Rock Since 1987


Posted By: BaldJean
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 08:59
Friede and I have a special liking for "Barbarella"; Jane Fonda is so hot in this movie


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A shot of me as High Priestess of Gaia during our fall festival. Ceterum censeo principiis obsta


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 12:09
Star Wars wouldn't qualify as speculative anyway.   For me it's a toss-up of Fantastic Voyage, Planet of the Apes, Logan's Run, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers.   Though my personal favorite of these four is probably Body Snatchers, I think Apes is the best film (though I've never been a big Apes fan).   I do love Fantastic Voyage though, and it is due for a good remake.   Innerspace, a mediocre spoof with Martin Short, was a well-made but pale attempt at a FV reinterpretation.   Actually the original has held up incredibly well considering how ancient it is, and is still impressive to watch.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=imgres&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiAwcnGqrjcAhXOHzQIHe7BDQgQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Fgoogle.com%2Fsearch%3Ftbm%3Disch%26q%3DFantastic%2520Voyage&psig=AOvVaw0udNAZ4Z5_lp3F3dQcVpyZ&ust=1532542152931608" rel="nofollow">Image result for fantastic voyage





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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought."   -- John F. Kennedy


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 12:41
^^^ Love Slaughterhouse Five (Kurt Vonnegut is one om very favourite authors), Soylent Green and The Andromeda Strain of course, but the Amdromeda Strain is a particular favourite of those films (been meaning to read the Michael Crichton novel) .

^^ Great to see a vote for Barbarella. She and the the Great Tyrant are great beauties, and it is a very sexy and a very funny film (and th theme song is pure feel good magic).

^^^ You're right about Star Wars, and I think I had meant speculative and or/sci-fi, but all of these are speculative science fiction films. I think of Star Wars as more fantasy than science fiction. Love your choices, and I recommend voting for all of them.

I am a pretty big Apes fan when it comes to those 60s-70s film franchise (the first two especially). Th original's sequel Beneath the Planet of the Apes is pretty terrific for my tastes.

"Glory be to the Bomb and to the holy fallout as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen."

I even loved the cartoon series, which is similar to the Star Trek cartoons. Have also watched the 1970s live action TV series, though I don't like it so much.

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Shame that the post-apocalytic A Boy and His Dog (with Don Johnson) has no votes in this multiple vote poll (that's one that Dean liked as I recall, wish he was still around). It is on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BDxqhI9qDw" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BDxqhI9qDw


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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 13:40
I vaguely remember the PotA animated series which as I recall was pretty good, but the Star Trek one--  wow, such a strange and bizarrely funny show.   Everyone sounds like they're stoned and floating in ether.

But my all time fave ~

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiz7-TjvrjcAhUn6IMKHUUSBOoQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Funiversoaicsp.blogspot.com%2F2009%2F10%2Fdublagem-inesquecivel-03-jonny-quest.html&psig=AOvVaw0l0VGbSSFCmIsYUy4WHYF3&ust=1532547436261869" rel="nofollow">Related image




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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought."   -- John F. Kennedy


Posted By: AEProgman
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 13:54
^Oh man, I loved Jonny Quest!  The episode with giant spider and the tank....what memories!

Anyway, 
Planet of the Apes
Andromeda Strain
Omega Man
Fantastic Voyage
Soylent Green......They're making food out of people!!!


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Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 14:58
My late father hated SF-movies; he considered them all to be nonsense. With one exception: "Soylent Green". He used to say: "This is what it will come to". He especially loved the scene with the dying Edward G. Robinson.


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BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 17:19
Originally posted by Logan Logan wrote:

^^^ Love Slaughterhouse Five (Kurt Vonnegut is one om very favourite authors)

Same here.  I'd love to see a film adaptation of 'Breakfast of Champions' LOL


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https://wytchcrypt.wixsite.com/mutiny-in-jonestown" rel="nofollow - Mutiny in Jonestown : Progressive Rock Since 1987


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 20:13
2001 is hard to beat....but I also like Clockwork, Solaris, Fahrenheit 451, Slaughterhouse 5, and guilty pleasures Boy and His Dog and Man Who Fell To Earth.

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One does nothing yet nothing is left undone.
Haquin


Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: July 24 2018 at 21:24
Originally posted by Atavachron Atavachron wrote:

I vaguely remember the PotA animated series which as I recall was pretty good, but the Star Trek one--  wow, such a strange and bizarrely funny show.   Everyone sounds like they're stoned and floating in ether.

But my all time fave ~

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiz7-TjvrjcAhUn6IMKHUUSBOoQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=http%3A%2F%2Funiversoaicsp.blogspot.com%2F2009%2F10%2Fdublagem-inesquecivel-03-jonny-quest.html&psig=AOvVaw0l0VGbSSFCmIsYUy4WHYF3&ust=1532547436261869" rel="nofollow">Related image


Quest was the best!


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...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: micky
Date Posted: July 25 2018 at 18:50
ahhh...  yes it is not 2001 and high art.  but my vote goes to a movie I saw as a little itty bitty Micky and still today it holds a key place in my social and political conscience.

Silent Running.


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The Pedro and Micky Experience - When one no longer requires psychotropics to trip


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: July 25 2018 at 20:02
Which version of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" do you mean, the original or the remake?


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BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: July 25 2018 at 21:13
Both are so good--  I'm guessing the remake is the one in question (the first remake, that is).



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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought."   -- John F. Kennedy


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 25 2018 at 22:07
I like the four adaptations of Jack Finney's 1955 novel The Body Snatchers listed below in their own ways.

I am indeed referring to the 1978 Philip Kaufman Invasion of the Body Snatchers. The 1956 version directed by Don Siegel is a few years too early for the purposes of this 1960s and 70s poll. Had I set no temporal limits, then both would be applicable.

I like the 2007 with Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig film called The Invasion very much and I enjoyed 1993's Body Snatchers.

I haven't seen Invasion of the Pod People.

By the way, perhaps a novel poll would be in order, Jack Finney's The Body Snatchers (1955) vs. the similarly themed 1951 novel by Robert A. Heinlein called The Puppet Masters (I've read the Heinlein, and seen the movie, but not yet read the Finney).

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: BaldJean
Date Posted: July 26 2018 at 07:03
IMDB has the original at 7.8 and the remake with Donald Sutherland at 7.4, which is about how I see them in relation


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A shot of me as High Priestess of Gaia during our fall festival. Ceterum censeo principiis obsta


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 26 2018 at 09:16
And at rottentomatoes:

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956)

TOMATOMETER
98%
Average Rating: 9/10
Reviews Counted: 51
Fresh: 50
Rotten: 1
Critics Consensus: One of the best political allegories of the 1950s, Invasion of the Body Snatchers is an efficient, chilling blend of sci-fi and horror.

AUDIENCE SCORE
85%
liked it
Average Rating: 3.7/5
User Ratings: 19,008

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1978)

All Critics | Top Critics
TOMATOMETER
94%
Average Rating: 8.2/10
Reviews Counted: 52
Fresh: 49
Rotten: 3
Critics Consensus: Employing gritty camerawork and evocative sound effects, Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a powerful remake that expands upon themes and ideas only lightly explored in the original.

AUDIENCE SCORE
81%
liked it
Average Rating: 3.4/5
User Ratings: 35,169

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So also a preference for the original film, but both very highly rated. The 1978 has three "rottens" and the 1956 only one "rotten".

Fun to look at the negative ones even if I really like both. I have a slight preference for the remake, but we discussed our differences in another thread (unless that was with Friede). The 1978 film was, according to what I've read in the past, part remake of the 1956 film and part a fresh adaptation of the 1955 novel ("The Invasion" is more a loosely based on the novel film).

Here's an excerpt from one one critical review of the 1978 film:

Originally posted by Ted Whitehead of The Spectator Ted Whitehead of The Spectator wrote:

I remember Invasion of the Body Snatchers (X) as one of the very first sci-fi films to grab my imagination in the Fifties. The plot is the basic one about our planet being invaded by a plant-like organism which takes over humanity. The new version, with Donald Sutherland and Leonard Nimoy, is directed by Philip Kaufman from a screenplay by W.D. Richter. All the tension and scariness of the original has gone and in its place is a bit of floppy old cabbage. See the Fifties version if you can.


Well, it is a conservative publication and conservatives tend not to favour change. Plus, perhaps the political allegory of the original resonated more when the cold war and fear of the spread of communism, McCarthyism, was at its height.

Said it before, but while I tend not to like remakes, the 1978 one resonated with me (It was also the first version that I saw). And perhaps since it is also a fresh adaptation of the source novel even though I haven't read it (though also inspired by the earlier film), perhaps it works better than if it was one of those just based on an earlier film films. No matter how many versions of, say, Macbeth that there are, there remains room to come up with an interesting take on the source material.

Anyway, here's a negative "review" (I use the term loosely and for an audience member and I would just call it an uninteresting comment) of the 1956 version.

Originally posted by Scott M Scott M wrote:


The most over-rated science fiction movie ever. I give it an A+ for the idea, but an F for the execution. Just drags on and on and on. Really bad movie.


You, sir, are a really bad reviewer, and I give you an F for execution and an F for conceptualisation.   At least your review doesn't drag on and on. If just one person thinks this "review" is good, then your review is grossly overrated.

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: BaldJean
Date Posted: July 26 2018 at 10:09
I saw the original first. the remake doesn't have the almost claustrophobic atmosphere of the original. this may partly be because the remake is in color. b/w is in my opinion definitely the better medium for such a tale


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A shot of me as High Priestess of Gaia during our fall festival. Ceterum censeo principiis obsta


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 26 2018 at 10:39
I agree about the claustrophobic atmosphere. Various Philip K. Dick would suit black and white too, methinks, because of the oppressiveness and sense of paranoia in his works. The later The Twilight Zone did not nearly appeal to me as much as the original, partially that was because of the writing ancd acting, but also a big part was the look of them.

I see the films as different enough for me to really appreciate both in their own rights, and I really like the look of both, but I respect differences in opinion (generally-speaking).

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: July 26 2018 at 12:26
I find the '78 film has allegory as well, just for a different time.   I feel it reflects the intellectual and social upheavals of the 1970s and the quiet war between the new intellectual Left and old vigilante Right of San Francisco, a kind of variation on the Red Scare and paranoia of the original film.   And as a lifelong San Franciscan, I can tell you the mood that was captured and cultural details were spot on.





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"Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought."   -- John F. Kennedy


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: July 26 2018 at 21:43
Hi,

Wow ... a list that I have seen almost all of the films! And reviewed most of them!

Do you realize the incredible number of directors involved in your putting together this?

Kubrick, Godard, Tarkovsky, Truffaut, Coppola, Wise, Jones, Roeg, Vadim, Cammell ... 

I kinda did not vote, as my choices in this poll are so out there and weird, that I found it hard to decide. For example, DEMON SEED, was the followup film by Don Cammell, who was responsible along with Nicolas Roeg for PERFORMANCE, which still is, for me, one of the best and most literary films ever made, but a really hard one for most people to wrap their heads around, I think. It used to be a big midnight flick draw ... but the filming style and its presentation is probably something that would make this film in this list for me. Don's followup in DEMON SEED is a bit scary, but the whole thing stands up strongly due to Julie Christie. The ending kinda became ... showtime ... which I did not think was necessary, but that's me.

ALPHAVILLE, for me, is more Godard, than it is anything for this list. It was satirical in many ways, and its filming style reminiscent of a style of film that film school loves to study ... but for me, it never stood out that much. 

Both Tarkovsky films are good, although some folks do not like SOLARIS, and I think this may have been because the novel is such a visual treat that satisfying all of our tastes is hard. STALKER, is a sort of post-apocaliptyc film for me, and despite its length, it's still an interesting thing, though you kinda know from the start that ... yeah ... but the performances are good, and it carries the interest well.

NICHOLAS ROEG's The Man Who Fell to Earth is a wonderful film, however the story is so sad that you already know that you are not going to like the film  a lot, is what I thought at the time. There are some far out bits in there, but the political stuff with the government, gets to your skin ... and sadlyu, took the taste of the film out for me. I really liked the first half of the film, but the taking down of Mr. Newton, kinda became a really sad story. Very strong film, but it is told very fast, and that has a tendency to lose some of its greatness ... example ... the trip on a car looking out the window ... it's like ... what the heck ... what's that? And then the whole thing with Candy Clark is sad, and when she is scared witless, leaves us very cold, and it is very difficult to pick things up from there ... 

BARBARELLA was fun to watch, but the comic book was far better!

SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE is one of a kind ... very special book, too!

Lastly ... I like Arthur C. Clarke, however I was never totally enthralled with 2001. I thought at the time, that it was a bit off kilter, and in the end, took a LSD trip for our benefit. It has moments in it, that are not as clear as the novel, and I think that the film was probably cut up too much for it to have a much better linear sense. It is, however, a VISUALLY STUNNING film, as are many of Kubrick's films. Like David Lean, you can just about freeze any frame ... and you have a painting.

Some of the other films I thought were more for the Hollywood audience than they were serious films, but that's just an "aside" from me, since many of these films, when I saw them I did not take as seriously ... for example, I did see PLANET OF THE APES, but I was too stoned, and I did not enjoy the film. Same thing with ZARDOZ and LOGAN'S RUN as at that time, it was the thing to do. Same with FANTASTIC VOYAGE.

BTW, the Czech film FANTASTIC PLANET probably should be on this list? Nice film also.


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now try finding your own mirror/art! www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 27 2018 at 06:50
I caught Logan's Run, Zardoz, and Planet of the Apes as a child and the themes resonated with me then, and continue to (my username references Logan's Run). Zardoz is quite often considered to be a bad movie -- I think the final scenes very moving. It can be very absurd, but that's part of the fun for me. It's become a cult classic.   Every one of the films in the poll has some personal meaning to me.

That Fantastic Planet is one of my favourite animated films, and it is has one of my favourite soundtracks (Alain Goraguer's La planete sauvage).   By the way, for those who like that Alain Goraguer soundtrack, I recommend Karl Heinz Schäfer's Les Gants Blancs du Diable.

Side-note: I'm rather surprised that Woody Allen's Sleeper did not get a single vote or mention.   Since Woody Allen's Stardust Memories was mentioned in another of my polls of http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=114957&PID=5579400#5579400" rel="nofollow - fantastic cinema , (the 80s edition), I thought Sleeper might get a vote or a mention.

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: July 27 2018 at 07:29
I love Zardoz. Sean Connery in a red diaper with ammo belts across his bare chest, Charlotte Rampling (one of my favorite actresses), green bread, a flying stone head, "The gun is good! The penis is evil"! - what's there not to love?

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BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 27 2018 at 08:56
Originally posted by BaldFriede BaldFriede wrote:

I love Zardoz. Sean Connery in a red diaper with ammo belts across his
bare chest, Charlotte Rampling (one of my favorite actresses), green
bread, a flying stone head, "The gun is good! The penis is evil"! -
what's there not to love?


Sean Connery in a red diaper AND a wedding dress. While I think it has very interesting premise, and can be powerful, it's also a fun romp that shouldn't be taken too seriously.



This is rather gratuitous since I wrote and posted this silly "review" many years ago, and it's not well written, but...

Zardoz speakz to you, hiz chozen onez!



A really big, toothy, and freaky stone head magnificently soars through the azure sky. A group of men in red diapers (Exterminators) rush to meet it. Wearing masks with the same visage as the stone head, they gather worship-fully before the stone-head which gracefully lands. With a booming voice it addresses the Exterminators, "The gun is good. The penis is evil. The penis shoots seeds, and makes new life, and poisons the earth with a plague of men, as o­nce it was. But the gun shoots death, and purifies the earth. Now go forth and kill." The stone head, which is the Exterminator's God, Zardoz, spews forth guns which they greedily lap up.

The Exterminator Zed (Sean Connery like you’ve never seen him before) secretly enters the head which is the o­nly path into the Vortex – a land of immortals (the Eternals) with big mental powers and scanty clothing.

He has worked in the service of Zardoz, cleansing the Earth of Brutals (the masses outside the Vortex) but has learned that it was all based o­n a lie and seeks revenge! But while Zed resents the underhanded manipulation by the immortal denizens of the Vortex, who was manipulating the Eternals? And to what ends?

"We’ve all been used!"
"And re-used."
"And abused!"
"And amused."
"Hahahaha blech uhgah."

It seems that Zardoz, by director John Boorman who went o­n to make Excalibur, is a love it or hate it film – truly weird, truly different, and I think, truly wonderful. The final scenes are incredibly moving and powerful.

It’s a very surreal, satirical, sometimes disturbing, sometimes just plain bad, but ultimately poignant film. If fear of seeing Sean Connery in a bright red diaper AND a wedding dress doesn’t deter you, be warned, there are lots of topless females frolicking about, and a depraved orgy scene with seniors involved.

Scene to look out for: Super-human Zed punches through some saran wrap whilst incredulous bystanders exclaim, "It can’t be done, it’s impossible." This may require some suspension of disbelief on the part of the audience.



And Charlotte Rampling is a terrific actress -- I've liked her in everything I have seen. In terms of her recent work, I liked her character in the film version of Never Let Me Go (yes, the film is not as good as the novel, but the novel is amazing) very much, and while I wasn't terribly keen on the second season/ series of Broadchurch on the whole, she was great in it.

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: July 27 2018 at 09:10
I love her in the highly controversial "The Night Porter", "Farewell, My Lovely" (with a great Robert Mitchum too) and "Angel Heart"


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BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: July 27 2018 at 10:08
I haven't seen "Farewell, My Lovely". "The Night Porter" is quite something -- understandably controversial, very provocative, and fascinating in a morbid sort of way.

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: July 27 2018 at 13:50
Originally posted by Logan Logan wrote:

I haven't seen "Farewell, My Lovely". "The Night Porter" is quite something -- understandably controversial, very provocative, and fascinating in a morbid sort of way.

Well, here is "Farewell, My Lovely":



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BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: July 27 2018 at 18:19
Zardoz is an interesting surreal send-up...at times laughingly bad and at other times brilliantly weird.....that's what makes it so much fun.
;)


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One does nothing yet nothing is left undone.
Haquin


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: August 07 2020 at 03:14
Since we have been discussing 70s sci-fi in another topic. This list does miss many of my favourites, and as I said, Close Encounters of the Third Kind is not here because that was in another related poll of the time and I did not want to duplicate any of those entries. The Black Hole is another that left its mark on me as did Star Trek: The Motion Picture. And yes, I also like World on a Wire.
I cant remember if I did a part two, but I did a series of these through different decades/ eras.

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: August 07 2020 at 17:25
Originally posted by BaldJean BaldJean wrote:

I saw the original first. the remake doesn't have the almost claustrophobic atmosphere of the original. this may partly be because the remake is in color. b/w is in my opinion definitely the better medium for such a tale

IMHO, Kaufman's remake is far more scary and freaky and certainly claustrophobic. The final few minutes are sheer terror, especially since it's made even more painfully clear in the remake that there is simply no beating the invading lifeform.


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Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: August 07 2020 at 17:57
Hi,

I was thinking silly again ... the day they GROK my favorite book properly, and completely, I might become a better Sci-Fi person ... but in general, BLADE RUNNER for me is a nice Sci-Fi thing ... and I seem to like it that way, where some humanity is valuable and important. I'm not sure that even Lars von Trier could do a good job on it ... it would be too psychedelic for me, more than likely!

Some of the Sci-Fi I have read, left the human everything somewhere in the closet, or killed it off quickly! Wink


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Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: August 07 2020 at 19:16
Since you mention Blade Runner, I bumped my 80s poll that i had done as part of this series. I love Philip K. Dick and Blade Runner is an interesting very loose adaptation of his work. I also liked Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049 from 2017. As to the grok, Heinlein's Stranger in A Stranger Land is one of my very favourite novels -- I love how humanity is explored through alienation-- his otherness. Blade Runner is an interesting exploration of what it means to be human. A reason I like The Man Who Fell to Earth is because of the humanity of it.(that's a common thread in so much that I like).

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: Catcher10
Date Posted: August 07 2020 at 19:44
Out of all of these The Andromeda Strain takes the crown for me. The start of the movie is simply like WTF is going on in this town! A very serious movie

The remake of Farhenheit 451 was terrible, the original is good but the book was awesome. And yes Fantastic Voyage hopefully will be remade, G. del Torro needs to get it going again!


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Posted By: Hrychu
Date Posted: August 08 2020 at 03:54
I've only seen Logan's Run. I didn't really enjoy it. It's full of plot holes and the plot itself is kinda bland.

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“To fly with the canyon on a cliff, see the river crash and roar, see how it flows...”


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: August 08 2020 at 10:08
Originally posted by Hrychu Hrychu wrote:

I've only seen Logan's Run. I didn't really enjoy it. It's full of plot holes and the plot itself is kinda bland.


Surprised of all of these that would be the one you've seen, and the only one you've seen (be more surprised if you lived in an English-speaking country). I would guess that you're not big on sci-fi (or not of that period). You're hardly alone on Logan's Run -- it's a flawed film. Who knew the future would seem so much like a shopping mall? It's important enough to me to have chosen my username based on that. I can work my way around plot holes, fill in the gaps as I see fit, make sense of things, and not get too hung up on those in films generally. Where others often find plot holes, I can usually think of ways to explain those.   That would make an interesting topic. It's the atmosphere in part that I really like, and the concept, and it is one of those films I saw when I was about nine that had an indelible impact on my psyche. I originally caught it on TV with a friend, who is now a very good psychologist, at the Carousel scene. He said as they were floating up, "That looks like fun", then it clearly wasn't. He didn't like it, I, on the other hand, was fascinated and fixated by this spectacle with the cheering crowds shouting "Renew, renew!" I think I'd go the runner route, but who knows what or who I'd be if brought up in such a society. The idea of a whole society, system, dogma, ideology, religion based on a lie or misunderstanding is one of interest to me.

I almost wish I could get you to watch Zardoz, I think this image from A Clockwork orange might fit your reaction.



And no,I;m not suggesting you watch it. I don;t know enough about your tastes in film to make any recommendations. Logan;s Run is considered by many to be a poor film, but not quite to the extent that Zardoz (which has become a cult classic) is. I love Zardoz, but I am something of an oddball. Ultimately films like Zardoz and Logan's Run i find poignant, resonate with me, and move me. There's something I find ultimately very humanistic about those films, and how they approach living and dying. I feel like I grok them, and they have topics of interest to me philosophically and psychologically. They deeply resonate with me despite the flaws, and are to me never dull.

Maybe one could do one on Polish films, could make a Pole on that. Krzysztof Kieślowski, a Polish director, is one of my very favourite directors, and played a major role in me wanting to go into film studies. As did Agnieszka Holland. I had a wonderful time in Warsaw and would like to spend more time in Poland.

By the way, missed the A in Clockwork Orange despite it being one of my very favourite films (not a film I can easily watch now, though). Watched 2001 with my wife; wasn't for her. To each his or her own tastes.

By the way, for those who haven't seen the fairly little known A Boy and His Dog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F6Iw5NSS8A" rel="nofollow - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F6Iw5NSS8A

What are some of your favourite films, Hrychu, of any time or style?

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"I'll see you again in 25 years. Meanwhile..." (Laura Palmer).


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: August 08 2020 at 10:36
I saw almost all of these movies. Jean and I are huge fans of "Barbarella" and "Zardoz". "Slaughterhouse Five", "2001: A Space Odyssey", "Clockwork Orange", "Fahrenheit 451", "Stalker", "Solaris", "Silent Running", "The Man Who Fell to Earth", The Andromeda Strain", "Soylent Green" (the only SF movie my father liked) and "Alphaville" are excellent too. I prefer the original of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" to the remake.

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BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: I prophesy disaster
Date Posted: August 08 2020 at 11:03
A Clockwork Orange was the first R-rated movie I saw after turning 18. I found it to be quite disturbing and I am not sure I can say I enjoyed it although I am glad I saw it. However, it is Fantastic Voyage that receives my vote for the listed film I most enjoyed as a young person. But there is one movie that seems to me to be a glaring omission: The Time Machine.
 
 
 


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Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: August 08 2020 at 14:43
Originally posted by I prophesy disaster I prophesy disaster wrote:

A Clockwork Orange was the first R-rated movie I saw after turning 18. I found it to be quite disturbing and I am not sure I can say I enjoyed it although I am glad I saw it.

Did you know Malcolm was quite upset with Stanley because the latter never rang him again after production was completed on Clockwork? Malcolm loved Stanley and loved working with him. Apparently, they never, ever spoke again. Not even a phone call. I can only assume Stanley never returned any of his calls.


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