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Powered Monitors Position

Printed From: Progarchives.com
Category: Other music related lounges
Forum Name: Tech Talk
Forum Description: Discuss musical instruments, equipment, hi-fi, speakers, vinyl, gadgets,etc.
URL: http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=124563
Printed Date: December 05 2021 at 17:23
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 11.01 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Powered Monitors Position
Posted By: JD
Subject: Powered Monitors Position
Date Posted: November 14 2020 at 12:02
I have a pair of JBL LSR2328p monitors.
I've always had them in the upright position but now I want to lay them over on their side.
Would you be inclined to have the tweeters to the inside or outside? I'm sitting about 3' from them.

Please explain your rational for me.

Many thanks.


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Replies:
Posted By: Vompatti
Date Posted: November 14 2020 at 13:06
Outside, for aesthetic reasons.

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Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: November 14 2020 at 13:12
No right or wrong. Try both positions and choose the one you prefer.


Posted By: JD
Date Posted: November 14 2020 at 16:23
Came across this article on Presonus.com

Many studio monitors shouldn’t be placed horizontally, as horizontal placement can degrade the stereo image, so it’s important to read the monitors’ documentation. Some monitors, like the PreSonus Eris https://www.presonus.com/products/Eris-E5" rel="nofollow - E5 , https://www.presonus.com/products/Eris-E44" rel="nofollow - E44 , and https://www.presonus.com/products/Eris-E66" rel="nofollow - E66 , can be placed horizontally or vertically. When orienting your studio monitors horizontally, they should form a mirror image of each other, with the tweeters on the outside.

But they don't say why.


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Posted By: Catcher10
Date Posted: November 14 2020 at 22:30
Originally posted by JD JD wrote:

I have a pair of JBL LSR2328p monitors.
I've always had them in the upright position but now I want to lay them over on their side.
Would you be inclined to have the tweeters to the inside or outside? I'm sitting about 3' from them.

Please explain your rational for me.

Many thanks.

Ideally, you want the tweeters as close to ear level as possible. 3' is very close, closer than what most call near field listening. So I really don't think it will matter much because of your distance, but I would have the tweeters to the outside to maximize the dispersion and potentially increase the soundstage....but honestly I don't think you will hear any difference.


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Posted By: Frenetic Zetetic
Date Posted: November 14 2020 at 23:44
Originally posted by Catcher10 Catcher10 wrote:

Originally posted by JD JD wrote:

I have a pair of JBL LSR2328p monitors.
I've always had them in the upright position but now I want to lay them over on their side.
Would you be inclined to have the tweeters to the inside or outside? I'm sitting about 3' from them.

Please explain your rational for me.

Many thanks.

Ideally, you want the tweeters as close to ear level as possible. 3' is very close, closer than what most call near field listening. So I really don't think it will matter much because of your distance, but I would have the tweeters to the outside to maximize the dispersion and potentially increase the soundstage....but honestly I don't think you will hear any difference.

^This is sound (pun fully intended!) advice.

What I do after something like that is established, is I close my eyes. Sounds dumb but you might find that, despite all logic, your speakers sound best with one tweeter inside and the other outside. I tune my guitar and bass amps and EQ this way; close your eyes and let the ears lead! Smile


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"I am so prog, I listen to concept albums on shuffle." -KMac2021


Posted By: JD
Date Posted: November 15 2020 at 07:03
Thanks everyone.
In the past when I've had bookshelf speakers that I wanted to set horizontally I always put the high end out. It just made sense to me. I'm a self taught soundman who never had the benefit of  a formal education in the field. It was baptism by fire the first time I had a 16ch board and 4way PA fired up. God, the first 4-6 months were brutal (1978-79). But then I began to understand the gear and did just that...focused on my hearing.
As has been suggested, I learned to close my eyes and listen.

Final story:
I was hired by Janice Morgan for her band (Network) for a west coast tour. We ended up in Calgary at the Four Seasons for a gig but when we arrived it looked like we had been double booked. The band setting up was Bobby Curtola (famous for his 'Things Go Better With Coka-Cola' ad) They were in the process of doing a sound check and it did NOT sound good. I wondered over to the desk to see if it was a room thing but it sounded the same there. What I found was a guy with a book on acoustical engineering open trying to work a formula for sound absorption coefficients to set his main EQ up. I had never seen anything like it or have since. I think I may have even told him, put the book down and just listen to what's going on.
I once thought that I'd like to  get an RTA, but never did. In the end I just learned how to listen.



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Thank you for supporting independently produced music


Posted By: Catcher10
Date Posted: November 16 2020 at 11:02
Originally posted by JD JD wrote:

Thanks everyone.
In the past when I've had bookshelf speakers that I wanted to set horizontally I always put the high end out. It just made sense to me. I'm a self taught soundman who never had the benefit of  a formal education in the field. It was baptism by fire the first time I had a 16ch board and 4way PA fired up. God, the first 4-6 months were brutal (1978-79). But then I began to understand the gear and did just that...focused on my hearing.
As has been suggested, I learned to close my eyes and listen.

Final story:
I was hired by Janice Morgan for her band (Network) for a west coast tour. We ended up in Calgary at the Four Seasons for a gig but when we arrived it looked like we had been double booked. The band setting up was Bobby Curtola (famous for his 'Things Go Better With Coka-Cola' ad) They were in the process of doing a sound check and it did NOT sound good. I wondered over to the desk to see if it was a room thing but it sounded the same there. What I found was a guy with a book on acoustical engineering open trying to work a formula for sound absorption coefficients to set his main EQ up. I had never seen anything like it or have since. I think I may have even told him, put the book down and just listen to what's going on.
I once thought that I'd like to  get an RTA, but never did. In the end I just learned how to listen.

You cannot second guess your ears, unless you don't have any Cry LOL. Its a combination of hearing and technical process, and some understanding of electronics. Gear makers make gear to sound a certain way, its inherent in the designer they will make what sounds good to them, or what they learned in EE school.

Like you said, you learned by listening and tweaking your setup.


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