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Pink Floyd: The Wall.

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Topic: Pink Floyd: The Wall.
Posted By: SteveG
Subject: Pink Floyd: The Wall.
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 11:22
I haven't listened to the entire album in years by skipping the trial section at the end, but it's still top shelf Floyd in my book. Your thoughts please.

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Replies:
Posted By: AFlowerKingCrimson
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 11:30
I agree. It might not be full blown prog but it's a great album. I haven't listened to it in a while either. I remember a few years ago one of the radio stations in my area played the whole thing in it's entirety and the listeners went crazy (in a good way) almost as if they never heard the whole thing before. 

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When you list all the qualities that you despise and you realize you're describing yourself.


Posted By: The Anders
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 11:38
It's in many ways more of a Roger Waters than a Pink Floyd project, but there is some astonishingly beautiful music on it. Not necessarily one of their most cohesive works though, but I wouldn't want to live without "Goodbye Blue Sky", "One of My Turms", "Nobody Home" or "Comfortably Numb".


Posted By: dougmcauliffe
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 11:42
I'm not really that big into it, a solid rock record for sure, but I just don't think it stands up as one of their best works. I don't think it's very cohesive for one, you can really pick out the songs where the full band had contributions compared to the ones clearly penned entirely by Waters, and I just think so many other records have explored the themes of the wall better than the wall does. Most the songs are good, maybe a couple duds, but idk, just not one of my favorites. I do really like side 3 though.

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The sun has left the sky...
...Now you can close your eyes


Posted By: nick_h_nz
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 11:52
It’s top three Floyd for me, along with Wish You Were Here and Animals (which come first and second in my personal Pink pantheon).

The opening sequence of tracks on Side One is amazing. And the whole thing is better live. Ever since In The Flesh was released, I’ve barely listened to the original album, preferring the live incarnation.

Seeing and hearing the album performed as a laser show at the Space Needle in Seattle was one of the highlights of my visit to the US many moons ago.

I can totally understand why a lot of people (and, for that matter, a lot of Floyd fans) don’t like it, and it does in many ways sound like it was a completely different band (a surrogate band?) playing it, compared to previous Floyd albums - but damn, it’s a good album. I love it. ❤️



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https://tinyurl.com/nickhnz-tpa" rel="nofollow - Reviewer for The Progressive Aspect


Posted By: suitkees
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 11:58
For me it is one of those albums that have a special place. When it came out, as adolescent, I was just starting to develop more consciously some musical preferences and The Wall was one of the most impressive things I had heard. Soon after I saw the film, which gave me an even bigger impression. Now, with some 40 years of distance, I still like it very much, but also recognize some lack of cohesiveness (not that that bothers me that much); there are more than just a few fantastic gems on it, which makes it even now a great listen. Isn't that a characteristic of something that we might call a masterpiece?


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"Maybe nothing is really true, and not even that." Multatuli


Posted By: nick_h_nz
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 12:10
Yeah, I think a lot of why I like it so much is because I came to it as I was coming of age, musically, and also at a time when I was feeling if not entirely nihilistic, very much alienated. When it was released, it passed me by. I was aware of it, but apart from ABitW, pt. 2, i wouldn’t have been able to tell you anything more about it. I think it’s lucky I didn’t cotton on to it back then, as I don’t think I’d have anywhere near the appreciation or love for it that I do now.



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https://tinyurl.com/nickhnz-tpa" rel="nofollow - Reviewer for The Progressive Aspect


Posted By: Evolver
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 12:10
Middling album for Floyd.
A handful of good songs.
Nick Mason sleeps through most of it.
Richard Wright famously barely there.
Better than The Final Cut.


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Trust me. I know what I'm doing.


Posted By: Nogbad_The_Bad
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 12:30
Originally posted by Evolver Evolver wrote:

Middling album for Floyd.
A handful of good songs.
Nick Mason sleeps through most of it.
Richard Wright famously barely there.
Better than The Final Cut.


Couldn't have said it better

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Ian






Posted By: A Crimson Mellotron
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 12:59
An absolute masterpiece in terms of ideas and their execution, musicality, expressivity, and pure emotion. Even if the listener is not absorbing the whole thing at once, he could enjoy just some individual songs. This is one of the very exceptional aspects about 'The Wall' - it works perfectly both as a continuous mammoth piece (and this is surely the way I like to listen to it) or as an album from which one can extract unbelievable songs which are at this point in time, unprecedented classics. And shall we mention the majestic movie that accompanied this achievement of rock music? With all this said, I must admit that I never understood the criticism towards 'The Wall', it is quite glorious and deserves all the praise it gets!


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 14:57
As predicted, The Wall is another split decission album. It's a bit Waters for some with too little Wright. But C'est la vie. I like it for what it is, even though I think Waters extended his reach with this one.

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Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 15:36
I adore it. While it's not one I often play now, it will always have a very special place in my heart. It is something of a sentimental fave. I was young, and my brother bought and played it for me soon after it was released (the artwork first caught my attention). Some complain of filler, but I would not be without one track off the album. I really appreciate it from beginning to end.

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"The first step on the path to wisdom is the recognition of one's own ignorance" (paraphrased from Plato).


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 15:40
It has some really good songs but a lot of mediocre stuff also....I could never sit through all of it at one time...
and mostly played the Numb side.


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One does nothing yet nothing is left undone.
Haquin


Posted By: nick_h_nz
Date Posted: January 02 2021 at 15:41
I’ve never understood the filler argument, either. There’s nothing I’d lose.
Same for Lamb Lies Down On Broadway. There’s not a single track I would wish to lose.
It’s also always the second disc that people complain of filler, I’ve noticed, on any double album. To me, this is more indicative of listener fatigue, than any real presence of filler. 🤷🏻‍♂️



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https://tinyurl.com/nickhnz-tpa" rel="nofollow - Reviewer for The Progressive Aspect


Posted By: Frenetic Zetetic
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 00:29
The Wall has always felt like Roger Waters and company, rather than a raw PF record.

Still solid music but not a go-to for me.


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"I am so prog, I listen to concept albums on shuffle." -KMac2021


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 01:37
Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 08:01
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.

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Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 08:20
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.

Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.


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...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: Catcher10
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 10:27
Originally posted by A Crimson Mellotron A Crimson Mellotron wrote:

An absolute masterpiece in terms of ideas and their execution, musicality, expressivity, and pure emotion. Even if the listener is not absorbing the whole thing at once, he could enjoy just some individual songs. This is one of the very exceptional aspects about 'The Wall' - it works perfectly both as a continuous mammoth piece (and this is surely the way I like to listen to it) or as an album from which one can extract unbelievable songs which are at this point in time, unprecedented classics. And shall we mention the majestic movie that accompanied this achievement of rock music? With all this said, I must admit that I never understood the criticism towards 'The Wall', it is quite glorious and deserves all the praise it gets!

My hero!!! Clap

The Wall today still hits me like it did in '79, I remember coming home from HS for weeks after it came out and doing one thing before anything, spinning The Wall (all 4 sides). It really is like a movie with ups and downs but as a complete movie its easily Best Picture caliber.

When I want to spin it I make sure I am ready to hear all 4 sides.....very rare I will only listen to 1-2 sides.


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Posted By: Catcher10
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 10:36
Ohh no, no flat production at all! It was mastered at The Mastering Lab and my original version sounds amazing. The 2012 remaster that was cut by Doug Sax and James Guthrie is brilliant, this version opens up the sound a bit more and the soundstage is awesome! Certain parts of the original mix have a muddy mix and this is all fixed. Also cut at The Mastering Lab.

Both versions feature Waters bass guitar out front giving the sound a huge presence.


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Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 11:16
Originally posted by The Anders The Anders wrote:

... Not necessarily one of their most cohesive works though, but I wouldn't want to live without "Goodbye Blue Sky", "One of My Turms", "Nobody Home" or "Comfortably Numb".

Hi,

Not sure how "cohesive" something has to be ... few novels and works fail to add something on the side, and different as a way to rest the story somewhat, but also to give it more depth at times.

Rock music, in general, has been cohesive, only in the way it sounds ... not in anything else ... heck ...next thing we're gonna say is that TFTO is cohesive and none of us can agree on any of its supposed meanings whatsoever.

FOR ME, The Wall was the continuation (or the end!) of the visual side of PF ... which in the early days of the 70's used sound effects and fun stuff within their QUADRAPHONIC sound system going around your ears in the concert hall, and it added an interesting thing to the shows ... a sense that life was going on and this is a little story from it ... I think they needed the minute or so to setup the synthesizers and the effects properly and it made sense. By DSOTM, the effects and visuals are well coordinated, but DSOTM might not be as well remembered without the most amazing, focused and centered light show ever. But it helped tell the story ... if there was one supposed to be there. The Wall, for me, is the culmination of all these visuals and how they were used before ... and I like to say that these visuals helped Roger write something more intelligently and better prepare for a show ... which of course was out of this world with all the cartoons and such.

In many ways ... the trial is important ... why? It's all the folks that hate it that this is about ... and the one person that feels attacked by it all ... and the general military-ness of the audience and folks, even within a progressive board. It makes perfect sense, and helps the story in The Wall really well ... the kid, alone, against the world and the masses!

In my book ... the artist against the masses and the world for new ideas and thoughts and music!

This all makes The Wall much more important and valuable, not only as a live show (my review here compares the later Wall show to the original show) ... still great ... but it's message now is diluted to just a few songs ... how sad!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now, where is your own art? An idea? www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 11:47
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

Greg, I've come to the conclusion that anyone who thinks that drums that were recorded in a real echo chamber is flat production must be have serious hearing difficulties. Muddy or congested? Yes. Flat as lacking dimension (neutral EQing is what Flat really means, btw) or dynamics? No, it's not that in the least.

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Posted By: grantman
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 12:03
Owned th.e record the 4th side ,i rarely listened to.


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: January 03 2021 at 19:22
Have gone up and down and back up with this album.

I got into Floyd long before I properly got into any of the other prog greats.  As a result, I had listened to The Wall over and over, digested the concept and also watched the movie by the time I got around to listening to full prog albums of Yes or Genesis.  

So...when I contrasted Lamb Lies Down On Broadway with Wall, I felt the latter was a little underwhelming.  Musically more so than lyrically.  It felt like the Brick In The Wall motif was repeated a zillion times. And The Trial...don't get me started on The Trial!

I also found that there were some similarities between the concept of Wall and that of Crime Of The Century but, again, liked the music of the latter more, especially Rudy, Asylum, the title track. 

I am afraid Nick Mason had become a massive liability for Floyd as rock evolved into a harder-edged direction and even subbing him with sessions hands wasn't enough to cover this up.  Rick Wright too was a passenger on this album.  It's not particularly clear to me that this was entirely Waters' doing but that's another day, another debate.  As Dark Elf said, the best songs are the ones where Gilmour is pulling all his weight and without him, the album would probably fall flat. 

And THEN, 2016 happened (actually, 2014 for me).  The rise of neo-fascism all over again made me see songs like In The Flesh reprise in a new light.  The videos of both that song and Waiting For The Worms make for chilling viewing. Suddenly, Waters' fable of a lonely guy who cannot find love turning into a Nazi fiend didn't seem so far fetched after all.  

I still cannot listen to the album in entirety anymore and prefer to pick my favourite moments from it.  But as a concept, the Wall still stands tall.  As a standalone Waters achievement, it's his most towering (though, as band efforts, I prefer DSOTM and Meddle).


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 03:13
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

Greg, I've come to the conclusion that anyone who thinks that drums that were recorded in a real echo chamber is flat production must be have serious hearing difficulties. Muddy or congested? Yes. Flat as lacking dimension (neutral EQing is what Flat really means, btw) or dynamics? No, it's not that in the least.

I've never been impressed by Floyd in terms of production, so don't care for the 'my ears are lying' tripe by people who clearly have very little idea but like to pretend otherwise. The whole 'thought police' thing on this forum is very wearing at times. I know what I hear. You of course are allowed to have an opinion but pretending you know what you are talking about is a whole other thing. As for Dark Side of The Moon being the 'gold standard' is a complete joke. What is this FM Radio or something? The most ridiculously over hyped album in terms of production there has ever been. Everything Alan Parsons has ever touched is so bland sounding. Quite strange really. 


Posted By: Blacksword
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 03:23
The Wall was an important 'entry' Floyd album for me, and a gateway album into prog. It's a very good album, but far from their best.

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Ultimately bored by endless ecstasy!


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 03:44
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

I've never been impressed by Floyd in terms of production, so don't care for the 'my ears are lying' tripe by people who clearly have very little idea but like to pretend otherwise. The whole 'thought police' thing on this forum is very wearing at times. I know what I hear. You of course are allowed to have an opinion but pretending you know what you are talking about is a whole other thing. As for Dark Side of The Moon being the 'gold standard' is a complete joke. What is this FM Radio or something? The most ridiculously over hyped album in terms of production there has ever been. Everything Alan Parsons has ever touched is so bland sounding. Quite strange really. 

But that sounds more like a music issue than a production issue.  I mean AP WAS associated with super bland adult contemp rock kinda stuff. Just listen to Nick Mason on Live at Pompeii.  There's nothing much a producer can do about that drum sound.  

The elephant in the room is why do even top notch drummers feel so compelled to rationalize or contextualize Mason?  Sure he was a creative force but his chops are hardly much to crow about.  Ergo, the dynamics you miss are really lacking in his playing itself, not the production.  And there isn't much room for the others to get dynamic when the drummer isn't.  

For that matter, based on Gilmour's long career (and I say this with the greatest respect), I don't think he can deliver Hackett like dynamics for you.  That's not his speciality.  Those albums kinda sound bland because the playing IS bland.  It's more 'classic rock' playing than prog rock playing.  Nobody wants to talk about this but it doesn't make it not true.  Floyd were the Beatles of the 70s.  They were great at putting together amazing albums, less so at playing brilliantly on those albums.


Posted By: Blacksword
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 04:27
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

I've never been impressed by Floyd in terms of production, so don't care for the 'my ears are lying' tripe by people who clearly have very little idea but like to pretend otherwise. The whole 'thought police' thing on this forum is very wearing at times. I know what I hear. You of course are allowed to have an opinion but pretending you know what you are talking about is a whole other thing. As for Dark Side of The Moon being the 'gold standard' is a complete joke. What is this FM Radio or something? The most ridiculously over hyped album in terms of production there has ever been. Everything Alan Parsons has ever touched is so bland sounding. Quite strange really. 


But that sounds more like a music issue than a production issue.  I mean AP WAS associated with super bland adult contemp rock kinda stuff. Just listen to Nick Mason on Live at Pompeii.  There's nothing much a producer can do about that drum sound.  

The elephant in the room is why do even top notch drummers feel so compelled to rationalize or contextualize Mason?  Sure he was a creative force but his chops are hardly much to crow about.  Ergo, the dynamics you miss are really lacking in his playing itself, not the production.  And there isn't much room for the others to get dynamic when the drummer isn't.  

For that matter, based on Gilmour's long career (and I say this with the greatest respect), I don't think he can deliver Hackett like dynamics for you.  That's not his speciality.  Those albums kinda sound bland because the playing IS bland.  It's more 'classic rock' playing than prog rock playing.  Nobody wants to talk about this but it doesn't make it not true.  Floyd were the Beatles of the 70s.  They were great at putting together amazing albums, less so at playing brilliantly on those albums.


An interesting perspective, and one I mostly agree with.

Floyds production could often be considered muddy IMO, with notable exceptions. WYWH is a brilliantly produced album. The Wall is also ok. Animals and Meddle are so so (although they are brilliant albums) The production job on DSOTM is somewhat over applauded due to the huge success of the album I suspect. As for Mason's drumming, it's basic but I wouldn't say it was bad. Floyds whole schtick was slow, thoughtful, drifting music, which could be considered lugubrious, but presumably that was the intention of the band, rather than a restriction imposed by Mason's playing style. Virtuoso playing is not a prerequisite of making prog rock - it can help - but it's about composition and feel IMO.

In any case, yes I agree about Alan Parsons. Again I think he is 'over applauded' due to his work on DSOTM. I have heard around four APP albums, and they are almost completely unremarkable, and I don't really consider them prog rock. Mildly progressive at a push.

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Ultimately bored by endless ecstasy!


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 05:53
Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Floyds whole schtick was slow, thoughtful, drifting music, which could be considered lugubrious, but presumably that was the intention of the band, rather than a restriction imposed by Mason's playing style.

I think it's a bit of both.  I read in a recent Classic Rock interview that Mason could not play the time sig of Mother and a session hand played on the recording.  NOW you have to say it is difficult to imagine any of Bruford/Collins/Palmer/Weathers having any difficulty playing that song. And while it may not have been necessary for him to play balls out most of the time, I think the ability to produce lots of variations in your drumming is also correlated to a reasonable amount of virtuosity and the exceptions only prove the rule. They are both related to the amount of control a drummer has over his instrument.

There can't be too many drummers who could only play the most basic patterns but somehow had the most awesome dynamic range. I don't think Mason falls into that basket at any rate. 


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 06:11
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

Greg, I've come to the conclusion that anyone who thinks that drums that were recorded in a real echo chamber is flat production must be have serious hearing difficulties. Muddy or congested? Yes. Flat as lacking dimension (neutral EQing is what Flat really means, btw) or dynamics? No, it's not that in the least.


I've never been impressed by Floyd in terms of production, so don't care for the 'my ears are lying' tripe by people who clearly have very little idea but like to pretend otherwise. The whole 'thought police' thing on this forum is very wearing at times. I know what I hear. You of course are allowed to have an opinion but pretending you know what you are talking about is a whole other thing. As for Dark Side of The Moon being the 'gold standard' is a complete joke. What is this FM Radio or something? The most ridiculously over hyped album in terms of production there jhas ever been. Everything Alan Parsons has ever touched is so bland sounding. Quite strange really. 
We are not talking about DSotM or any APP albums or, indeed, Alan Parsons as a recording engineer. Parsons and EMI/Abbey Road studios had nothing to do with the production of The Wall. If you base your opinions on the sound of The Wall by other albums that have proceeded it, then I can only surmise that you have worse problems than just poor hearing. In an effort to be fair, The Wall is no super detailed audiophile grade recording. It wasn't meant to be. Bob Ezrin, a hard rock producer (Alice Cooper/Kiss) was employed to give the album a live "rock concert" sound which he did admirably. He used just enough heavy echo and reverb on certain key instruments, like bass, drums and vocals, to keep the recordings from sounding like a Phil Spector Wall of Sound production. Indeed, if you listen to old Spector records you will almost hear the same degree of muddiness and congestion. It's part of the process, unfortunately. If this is indeed what you object to, I can understand. But I don't think it is as that has nothing to do with sounding "flat", as in "lifeless".

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Posted By: Blacksword
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 06:21
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Floyds whole schtick was slow, thoughtful, drifting music, which could be considered lugubrious, but presumably that was the intention of the band, rather than a restriction imposed by Mason's playing style.


I think it's a bit of both.  I read in a recent Classic Rock interview that Mason could not play the time sig of Mother and a session hand played on the recording.  NOW you have to say it is difficult to imagine any of Bruford/Collins/Palmer/Weathers having any difficulty playing that song. And while it may not have been necessary for him to play balls out most of the time, I think the ability to produce lots of variations in your drumming is also correlated to a reasonable amount of virtuosity and the exceptions only prove the rule. They are both related to the amount of control a drummer has over his instrument.

There can't be too many drummers who could only play the most basic patterns but somehow had the most awesome dynamic range. I don't think Mason falls into that basket at any rate. 


I must admit I didn't know that about Mother. Jeff Porcaro played on the track apparently. You learn something every day! :-)



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Ultimately bored by endless ecstasy!


Posted By: Blacksword
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 06:35
Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Floyds whole schtick was slow, thoughtful, drifting music, which could be considered lugubrious, but presumably that was the intention of the band, rather than a restriction imposed by Mason's playing style.


I think it's a bit of both.  I read in a recent Classic Rock interview that Mason could not play the time sig of Mother and a session hand played on the recording.  NOW you have to say it is difficult to imagine any of Bruford/Collins/Palmer/Weathers having any difficulty playing that song. And while it may not have been necessary for him to play balls out most of the time, I think the ability to produce lots of variations in your drumming is also correlated to a reasonable amount of virtuosity and the exceptions only prove the rule. They are both related to the amount of control a drummer has over his instrument.

There can't be too many drummers who could only play the most basic patterns but somehow had the most awesome dynamic range. I don't think Mason falls into that basket at any rate. 


I must admit I didn't know that about Mother. Jeff Porcaro played on the track apparently. You learn something every day! :-)



I've just re-listened to Mother after some considerable time. It's not difficult to play, despite the fluctuating meter. I've just played along to it on my practice kit, and it's fairly easy. I'm surprised Mason had problems with that! He coped with Money, and that's 7/4 with a switch to 4/4 for the middle section.

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Ultimately bored by endless ecstasy!


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 07:45
Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Floyds whole schtick was slow, thoughtful, drifting music, which could be considered lugubrious, but presumably that was the intention of the band, rather than a restriction imposed by Mason's playing style.


I think it's a bit of both.  I read in a recent Classic Rock interview that Mason could not play the time sig of Mother and a session hand played on the recording.  NOW you have to say it is difficult to imagine any of Bruford/Collins/Palmer/Weathers having any difficulty playing that song. And while it may not have been necessary for him to play balls out most of the time, I think the ability to produce lots of variations in your drumming is also correlated to a reasonable amount of virtuosity and the exceptions only prove the rule. They are both related to the amount of control a drummer has over his instrument.

There can't be too many drummers who could only play the most basic patterns but somehow had the most awesome dynamic range. I don't think Mason falls into that basket at any rate. 


I must admit I didn't know that about Mother. Jeff Porcaro played on the track apparently. You learn something every day! :-)



I've just re-listened to Mother after some considerable time. It's not difficult to play, despite the fluctuating meter. I've just played along to it on my practice kit, and it's fairly easy. I'm surprised Mason had problems with that! He coped with Money, and that's 7/4 with a switch to 4/4 for the middle section.
I think that Roger Waters said that Nick couldn't play it and that was that. ;)

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Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 07:58
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

...
 What is this FM Radio or something? The most ridiculously over hyped album in terms of production there has ever been. Everything Alan Parsons has ever touched is so bland sounding. Quite strange really. 

Hi
I wonder if this is unfair ... for the time and place that it came out, it was the cleanest and best thing in recording ... that only George Martin and Tom Dowd could come close to ... but unlike the others, Allan's ability was the clarity of each instrument ... and yeah, I suppose that makes things a bit bland, but you are hearing something that most musicians would love to hear themselves ... a nice clear sound all around ... and in some ways, this made for a bit more simplicity in the whole thing and likely better equipment behind it all ... instead of just the studio "making the band" ... like George did and Tom did, specially with "Layla" ... and how it was discovered ... see his special for details ... it was not exactly an accident, but more of a person's attention to their work as they rehearsed ... once recorded, it becomes easy for them to learn what they did!

Allan, in some ways made things sound cleaner ... a lot more than before ... and I'm OK with that, and for the history of "recording" it was really good ... 

My only concern is us comparing a recording done in 1972/1973 to something that is done in 2021 inside a nice clean digital setup, which makes things easier, not not necessarily better ... bland as heck, since I doubt that as many musicians have the knowledge and ability to use effects so cleanly and well.

Saying a recording from yesterday was crap ... is bad ... it was the best there was at the time ... just like folks here can't relate to the RED SEAL recordings of a few records in the late 1960's ... which were beautifully done ... but today we have no idea what that meant for the business of recording ... essentially, Allan Parsons did the same thing ... and made sure it was clean and clear ... which is what made the RED SEAL albums famous, specially for people with high end stereo systems, where you could hear the clarity.

DSOTM sounds bland, on mp3 ... PERIOD. But get a good stereo, with very good speakers, and a nice stylus for the turntable (cost of all three past 2K on all these) ... and the difference is MASSIVE ... and I don't think you know about it ... because if you did, I doubt you would have made that comment about bland ... but many other things by Allan did not sound "bland" ... they cleaned up and made the artist sound a lot better than before!

PF's earlier recordings were muddled and not clean by comparison, sort of like a microphone hanging from the ceiling picking it all up ... and hoping that SW can clean these up 45 years later. SW's work is not better than what Allan did, or Tom, or George. He just thinks it is, and because he talks good game, everyone thinks he is better.


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now, where is your own art? An idea? www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 09:04
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by Blacksword Blacksword wrote:

Floyds whole schtick was slow, thoughtful, drifting music, which could be considered lugubrious, but presumably that was the intention of the band, rather than a restriction imposed by Mason's playing style.


I think it's a bit of both.  I read in a recent Classic Rock interview that Mason could not play the time sig of Mother and a session hand played on the recording.  NOW you have to say it is difficult to imagine any of Bruford/Collins/Palmer/Weathers having any difficulty playing that song. And while it may not have been necessary for him to play balls out most of the time, I think the ability to produce lots of variations in your drumming is also correlated to a reasonable amount of virtuosity and the exceptions only prove the rule. They are both related to the amount of control a drummer has over his instrument.

There can't be too many drummers who could only play the most basic patterns but somehow had the most awesome dynamic range. I don't think Mason falls into that basket at any rate. 


I must admit I didn't know that about Mother. Jeff Porcaro played on the track apparently. You learn something every day! :-)



I've just re-listened to Mother after some considerable time. It's not difficult to play, despite the fluctuating meter. I've just played along to it on my practice kit, and it's fairly easy. I'm surprised Mason had problems with that! He coped with Money, and that's 7/4 with a switch to 4/4 for the middle section.
I think that Roger Waters said that Nick couldn't play it and that was that. ;)

From what I remember of that article, Mason himself said he could no longer play that stuff by then.  That was shocking.  But maybe not so shocking considering the arsenal of musicians Gilmour seemed to have to employ for the Delicate Sound of Thunder/Pulse shows. Multiple keyboardists, multiple drummers...while he continued to sing and play guitar just the same. 


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 09:07
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

DSOTM sounds bland, on mp3 ... PERIOD. But get a good stereo, with very good speakers, and a nice stylus for the turntable (cost of all three past 2K on all these) ... and the difference is MASSIVE ... and I don't think you know about it ... because if you did, I doubt you would have made that comment about bland ... but many other things by Allan did not sound "bland" ... they cleaned up and made the artist sound a lot better than before!





Never heard DSOTM...or any prog album...on vinyl but I have the 30th anniversary remaster and listening to the opening bars of Breathe on a good speaker system with proper separation is an experience to behold. Not many recordings sound like that.  


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 09:54
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

DSOTM sounds bland, on mp3 ... PERIOD. But get a good stereo, with very good speakers, and a nice stylus for the turntable (cost of all three past 2K on all these) ... and the difference is MASSIVE ... and I don't think you know about it ... because if you did, I doubt you would have made that comment about bland ... but many other things by Allan did not sound "bland" ... they cleaned up and made the artist sound a lot better than before!





Never heard DSOTM...or any prog album...on vinyl but I have the 30th anniversary remaster and listening to the opening bars of Breathe on a good speaker system with proper separation is an experience to behold. Not many recordings sound like that.  
indeed, DSotM and Abbey Road are still my old go test recordings.

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Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 10:26
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

...
Never heard DSOTM...or any prog album...on vinyl but I have the 30th anniversary remaster and listening to the opening bars of Breathe on a good speaker system with proper separation is an experience to behold. Not many recordings sound like that.  

Hi,

Even more important, was the fact that the ENGLISH original pressing was pristine clear and the AMERICAN recording was taken from a trash can from a Hollywood party tape! The difference is astronomical, and the "remaster" only makes it closer to the ENGLISH pressing of the album, which was very clean, and not muddled.

The same thing happened to Sgt. Pepper's where the original ENGLISH pressing was vastly superior with all the background stuff shining like crazy which was all muddled for the AMERICAN pressing. An absolute travesty if you ask me.

Some records, whether one likes them or not ... deserve a good listen ... the problem is, that I think that less that 5% (maybe 10%) of the folks here on PA have never even had a strong stereo system with outstanding equipment, with which they could have heard something ... and let me tell you that some of those RED SEAL albums, the classical music was phenomenal ... it gave you an understanding and an appreciation for the compositions that was unreal ... true music from the spheres (so to speak) and absolutely stunning! If you thought you needed Kubrick to show it to you, then you didn't know what you were missing sonically!

Nowadays, we have nothing like that ... and SW thinks his recordings are good and the ones he does for others better, and they aren't. They are mere manipulations and a little cleaning along the way but kinda "switching" the positions of the instruments with each other on KC does not make it better ... for me it made it stupid and worse! The charm got replaced with some plastic! And unfortunately that is just about all the folks know these days ... and speaking about those recordings 50 years ago, is really difficult because they never got to hear anything like it! Not to mention that the LP's being made today are bad and do not even come close or stand up to the original!


-------------
... none of the hits, none of the time ... now, where is your own art? An idea? www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Catcher10
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 10:41
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

DSOTM sounds bland, on mp3 ... PERIOD. But get a good stereo, with very good speakers, and a nice stylus for the turntable (cost of all three past 2K on all these) ... and the difference is MASSIVE ... and I don't think you know about it ... because if you did, I doubt you would have made that comment about bland ... but many other things by Allan did not sound "bland" ... they cleaned up and made the artist sound a lot better than before!





Never heard DSOTM...or any prog album...on vinyl but I have the 30th anniversary remaster and listening to the opening bars of Breathe on a good speaker system with proper separation is an experience to behold. Not many recordings sound like that.  

Hearing Dark Side what maybe 45yrs ago for the first time on my Montgomery Wards all in one stereo with small krappy speakers (of course back then I thought it was the shat!!) I was floored by the production of sound and the whole experience. 
Today, hearing it on what I have now its not even fair to compare....the system brings me walls of sound off the record, it's utterly crazy what Alan Parsons did back in the 72/73 at Abbey Road studios.....Even if you think the music is bland, the production of the record, the engineering is brilliant. And what Alan Parsons has received in accolades is well deserved, the music industry acknowledges what that record has done for the past 45+yrs.

If one does not like the music, that's fine although I could not imagine how or why?? Rogerthat is spot on, not many recordings sound like that, especially ones that are 45+ yrs old. It will remain as one of the top choices for people to play to "show off" their system, analog or digital.


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Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 11:19
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

Greg, I've come to the conclusion that anyone who thinks that drums that were recorded in a real echo chamber is flat production must be have serious hearing difficulties. Muddy or congested? Yes. Flat as lacking dimension (neutral EQing is what Flat really means, btw) or dynamics? No, it's not that in the least.

I've never been impressed by Floyd in terms of production, so don't care for the 'my ears are lying' tripe by people who clearly have very little idea but like to pretend otherwise. The whole 'thought police' thing on this forum is very wearing at times. I know what I hear. You of course are allowed to have an opinion but pretending you know what you are talking about is a whole other thing. As for Dark Side of The Moon being the 'gold standard' is a complete joke. What is this FM Radio or something? The most ridiculously over hyped album in terms of production there has ever been. Everything Alan Parsons has ever touched is so bland sounding. Quite strange really. 
I would suggest the only one in this conversation who has no idea what they are talking about is you. Clearly clueless. I am not even going to waste my time explaining why you are clueless about production techniques or studio production in a historical context because it would be a waste of time.


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...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 17:21
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

...
What is this FM Radio or something? The most ridiculously over hyped album in terms of production there has ever been. Everything Alan Parsons has ever touched is so bland sounding. Quite strange really. 

Hi,

Just so you know, in LA the FM signals from KMET and KLOS (the two biggies at the time) was pristine and really clean, and in fact there was a lot of issues when one asked why a record sounded so good then, and the album was not as good.

There are various thoughts, on that, but I think the original FM signal was actually two signals combined, and it created an atmosphere that was very different due to the air waves of transmission by the FM signal ... I don't think it is a dual signal anymore but I lost track of that information a long time ago.

It is POSSIBLE (and somewhat likely) that the signal was thought to be dual because of the cheesiness and crappiness of the AM signal which was really poor anywhere you went unless you were looking for Wolfman Jack, and even then the only thing that was insane was the power of that signal he was on! None of the stations here in Portland, for example, are even half as good as those early ones, and that would even include KTYD where Guy Guden did his show, and I have quite a few shows from 1974, and the quality of the stereo EVEN THEN is excellent, and I recorded most of these on a Maxell, or TDK 120 cassettes on an UHER deck and later on a Pioneer deck.

I have always thought the quality through a station was superior to the records, and I had the system to show it ... but the best we could do was get the albums. There might be some secrets here, as one of the engineers that worked in Santa Barbara on that station happened to do part time work also for KMET and went on to put together a show of jazz music that ran for many years. Joe Collins was his name. Another famous one is on that pay thing ... Jim Ladd ... the weird thing being that he had a huge hand in a lot of our favorite top 5 and he has said nothing about it all these years! 


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now, where is your own art? An idea? www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Rednight
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 17:43
A little goofy and much too mainstream for me. I actually enjoy A Momentary Lapse of Reason more, for what that's worth.

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"It just has none of the qualities of your work that I find interesting. Abandon [?] it." - Eno


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 21:56
I find it somewhat disappointing compared to the previous albums, and I'm really missing the longer songs with longer instrumental passages, and the contributions from Gilmour and Wright, but even so, I do believe it's a masterpiece in it's own right. It's actually the album (and song, you know which one) that got me into Pink Floyd, and so, among other artists, into prog. Yet, of course, once I got to know the rest of their discography, I found even better gems than this one.


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: January 04 2021 at 22:00
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.



As far as I remember, Gilmour only has writing credits on "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell". The rest of the album is all Waters... though I do remember reading once about the development from the album, and as far as I remember, Another Brick in the Wall 2 was only the vocal part as it was presented by Waters, only once, and it was Gilmour's idea to get the children's choir added to the song... and obviously he must have had some input on the creation of the guitar solo.


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 08:20
Originally posted by Rednight Rednight wrote:

A little goofy and much too mainstream for me. I actually enjoy A Momentary Lapse of Reason more, for what that's worth.

Hi,

Sadly, if you were there ... it was NOT mainstream ... it was completely different and for once, people were playing on the FM dial the whole of side one of the album ... 

You can't get that attention today, and appreciation ... but the lack of understanding of the history of the time and place ... makes a difference ... of course one might like AMLOR ... it is much more "modern" and more suited to today's audience than the conceptual nature of the SHOW (I don't think the album on its own is strong enough concept of anything except ideas!) ... which helped make it very famous!

But I can see why 2020 fan would say something like that ... sadly, the effect of how the music grew, just like the Beatles and Rolling Stones, or even Miles and many others that deserve to be studied and appreciated, has been lost because all folks can think about is "hit songs" and "pop songs" ... and that history is non-existent except for a top ten that continues on in classic rock ... complete with a cut up version of "Money" just to show you the hippocrisy!


-------------
... none of the hits, none of the time ... now, where is your own art? An idea? www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 08:22
Not mainstream rock but the album did get mainstream FM airplay.

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This message was brought to you by a proud supporter of the Deep State.


Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 09:09
Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

 

As far as I remember, Gilmour only has writing credits on "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell". The rest of the album is all Waters... though I do remember reading once about the development from the album, and as far as I remember, Another Brick in the Wall 2 was only the vocal part as it was presented by Waters, only once, and it was Gilmour's idea to get the children's choir added to the song... and obviously he must have had some input on the creation of the guitar solo.
Your information is incorrect. Gilmour has writing credits on all the songs I mentioned. Refer to Wiki for further info.


-------------
...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 09:21
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Not mainstream rock but the album did get mainstream FM airplay.

And as a millennial, I have seen the We Don't Need No Education video a bunch of times on VH1. It's an anthem like We Will Rock You. In fact, though DSOTM sold more copies, no single track on that album has the notoriety of ABITW pt2. 


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 11:04
I recall a few FM stations that spliced together ABitW parts 1, 2 and 3. My son was disappointed that they didn't appear on the album that way!

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Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 12:23
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

 

As far as I remember, Gilmour only has writing credits on "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell". The rest of the album is all Waters... though I do remember reading once about the development from the album, and as far as I remember, Another Brick in the Wall 2 was only the vocal part as it was presented by Waters, only once, and it was Gilmour's idea to get the children's choir added to the song... and obviously he must have had some input on the creation of the guitar solo.
Your information is incorrect. Gilmour has writing credits on all the songs I mentioned. Refer to Wiki for further info.

Rare we disagree, but I have just pulled out my old vinyl copy, and the only joint writing credits are (with Gilmour) Young Lust, Comfortably Numb, and Run Like Hell, and (with Ezrin) The Trial.


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In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 12:25
I overplayed it, years ago, now I rarely listen to it. Good album, PF at its most theatrical in places.


Posted By: nick_h_nz
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 12:59
Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

As far as I remember, Gilmour only has writing credits on "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell". The rest of the album is all Waters... though I do remember reading once about the development from the album, and as far as I remember, Another Brick in the Wall 2 was only the vocal part as it was presented by Waters, only once, and it was Gilmour's idea to get the children's choir added to the song... and obviously he must have had some input on the creation of the guitar solo.
Your information is incorrect. Gilmour has writing credits on all the songs I mentioned. Refer to Wiki for further info.

Rare we disagree, but I have just pulled out my old vinyl copy, and the only joint writing credits are (with Gilmour) Young Lust, Comfortably Numb, and Run Like Hell, and (with Ezrin) The Trial.

I think the confusion comes from misreading the Wikipedia page?  The Wiki page actually shows that Dellinger and Lazland are correct about writing credits, and The Dark Elf  is getting confused by who is listed as providing lead vocals..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wall#Track_listing" rel="nofollow - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wall#Track_listing



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https://tinyurl.com/nickhnz-tpa" rel="nofollow - Reviewer for The Progressive Aspect


Posted By: MortSahlFan
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 13:20
One of the greatest albums ever. And what ideas!


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https://www.scribd.com/document/382737647/MortSahlFan-Song-List


Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 13:30
Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

 

As far as I remember, Gilmour only has writing credits on "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell". The rest of the album is all Waters... though I do remember reading once about the development from the album, and as far as I remember, Another Brick in the Wall 2 was only the vocal part as it was presented by Waters, only once, and it was Gilmour's idea to get the children's choir added to the song... and obviously he must have had some input on the creation of the guitar solo.
Your information is incorrect. Gilmour has writing credits on all the songs I mentioned. Refer to Wiki for further info.

Rare we disagree, but I have just pulled out my old vinyl copy, and the only joint writing credits are (with Gilmour) Young Lust, Comfortably Numb, and Run Like Hell, and (with Ezrin) The Trial.

You and Dellinger are correct. My mistake. Vocals shared on those several songs, not writing credits. 


-------------
...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: January 05 2021 at 13:51
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

 

As far as I remember, Gilmour only has writing credits on "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell". The rest of the album is all Waters... though I do remember reading once about the development from the album, and as far as I remember, Another Brick in the Wall 2 was only the vocal part as it was presented by Waters, only once, and it was Gilmour's idea to get the children's choir added to the song... and obviously he must have had some input on the creation of the guitar solo.
Your information is incorrect. Gilmour has writing credits on all the songs I mentioned. Refer to Wiki for further info.

Rare we disagree, but I have just pulled out my old vinyl copy, and the only joint writing credits are (with Gilmour) Young Lust, Comfortably Numb, and Run Like Hell, and (with Ezrin) The Trial.

You and Dellinger are correct. My mistake. Vocals shared on those several songs, not writing credits. 

Actually, you do raise an interesting sort of general query or point, when you make reference to Gilmour having to have had some input on the guitar solo of Brick Part Two. I agree. It has Gilmour written all over it, yet he didn’t get a credit.

Earlier today, whilst working, I put on Asia Alpha as a bit of background. The Last to Know is one of my favourite Asia tracks, and one of the reasons for that is a lovely Steve Howe lick in between Wetton’s vocals in the chorus. I can’t imagine for the life of me Wetton and Downes, who have the writing credit, telling Howe to play that particular piece in that particular way. I can imagine Howe telling the pair of them to piss off if they did. However, he doesn’t have a credit.

There are probably many other examples. What defines who gets what credits on a song? The only thing I can think of are band politics in many instances.


-------------
In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 06 2021 at 15:09
Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by lazland lazland wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Massively important album for me as I left my teens and entered adulthood. Didn't listen to anything else around 1980-81 at all. Then became a bit bored of it . The biggest problem fore me is the flat production although admittedly this is a feature of most Floyd albums.
Flat production? It's perfect for what it was intended for. Producer Bob Ezrin had to move between sounding like a live band recording and studio work without sonically clashing and did a great job, imho.


Yes, "flat production that is a feature most Floyd albums". Because Dark Side of the Moon is a gold standard and most emulated and revered album for flat production. LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

Anyway, I think The Wall works best when David Gilmour is fully engaged, hence songs like "The Thin Ice", "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", "Mother", "Goodbye Blue Sky", "Young Lust, "Hey You", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell", all of which Gilmour has writing credits, and basically the best and most memorable parts of the album.

 

As far as I remember, Gilmour only has writing credits on "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell". The rest of the album is all Waters... though I do remember reading once about the development from the album, and as far as I remember, Another Brick in the Wall 2 was only the vocal part as it was presented by Waters, only once, and it was Gilmour's idea to get the children's choir added to the song... and obviously he must have had some input on the creation of the guitar solo.

Your information is incorrect. Gilmour has writing credits on all the songs I mentioned. Refer to Wiki for further info.


Rare we disagree, but I have just pulled out my old vinyl copy, and the only joint writing credits are (with Gilmour) Young Lust, Comfortably Numb, and Run Like Hell, and (with Ezrin) The Trial.


You and Dellinger are correct. My mistake. Vocals shared on those several songs, not writing credits. 


Actually, you do raise an interesting sort of general query or point, when you make reference to Gilmour having to have had some input on the guitar solo of Brick Part Two. I agree. It has Gilmour written all over it, yet he didn’t get a credit.

Earlier today, whilst working, I put on Asia Alpha as a bit of background. The Last to Know is one of my favourite Asia tracks, and one of the reasons for that is a lovely Steve Howe lick in between Wetton’s vocals in the chorus. I can’t imagine for the life of me Wetton and Downes, who have the writing credit, telling Howe to play that particular piece in that particular way. I can imagine Howe telling the pair of them to piss off if they did. However, he doesn’t have a credit.

There are probably many other examples. What defines who gets what credits on a song? The only thing I can think of are band politics in many instances.
Some how, long ago, contributions from other musicians were designated as arrangements, not songwriting. And has become the standard practice, unfortunately.

-------------
This message was brought to you by a proud supporter of the Deep State.


Posted By: Ruby900
Date Posted: January 18 2021 at 16:06
I have tried and wanted to love or even like this album. Every year I drag it and try it again - but every year I am left with the same feeling. I just don't like it. It's just doesn't have in it what I love about the Floyd - leaves me cold. It's partly the music, partly the dire production and quite a lot the concept. 




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"I always say that it’s about breaking the rules. But the secret of breaking rules in a way that works is understanding what the rules are in the first place". Rick Wakeman


Posted By: Zeph
Date Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:36
Not my favourite PF album. I used to rank it higher, but it hasn’t grown as well on me as some of their other albums. It has some excellent tracks, but I find the album to drag out a bit. I wouldn’t mind if it was cut down a bit.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:48
The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 20 2021 at 07:52
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile

are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL


Posted By: nick_h_nz
Date Posted: January 20 2021 at 08:35
Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile

are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL

I’m presuming he’s meaning the Roger Water album of The Wall live in Berlin? 🤷🏻‍♂️



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https://tinyurl.com/nickhnz-tpa" rel="nofollow - Reviewer for The Progressive Aspect


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: January 20 2021 at 20:31
Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile


are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL


I’m presuming he’s meaning the Roger Water album of The Wall live in Berlin? 🤷🏻‍♂️



Actually, that statement makes Perfect Sense. Though it would actually make even better sense if he were talking about The Final Cut.


Posted By: geekfreak
Date Posted: January 20 2021 at 20:52
Originally posted by Catcher10 Catcher10 wrote:

Originally posted by A Crimson Mellotron A Crimson Mellotron wrote:

An absolute masterpiece in terms of ideas and their execution, musicality, expressivity, and pure emotion. Even if the listener is not absorbing the whole thing at once, he could enjoy just some individual songs. This is one of the very exceptional aspects about 'The Wall' - it works perfectly both as a continuous mammoth piece (and this is surely the way I like to listen to it) or as an album from which one can extract unbelievable songs which are at this point in time, unprecedented classics. And shall we mention the majestic movie that accompanied this achievement of rock music? With all this said, I must admit that I never understood the criticism towards 'The Wall', it is quite glorious and deserves all the praise it gets!


My hero!!! Clap

The Wall today still hits me like it did in '79, I remember coming home from HS for weeks after it came out and doing one thing before anything, spinning The Wall (all 4 sides). It really is like a movie with ups and downs but as a complete movie its easily Best Picture caliber.

When I want to spin it I make sure I am ready to hear all 4 sides.....very rare I will only listen to 1-2 sides.





Sums up the album, in a impressive way imho

-------------
Where All Mad Here...




Music is my absolute escape form all of realistic realms of reality


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 03:57

The only digestable song off this wimpy album is Comfortably Numb. Nuff said !!!Big smileWinkTongueSmile
CryCry Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh where are you Syd!!!!!CryCry


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 05:04
Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:


The only digestable song off this wimpy album is Comfortably Numb. Nuff said !!!Big smileWinkTongueSmile
CryCry Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh where are you Syd!!!!!CryCry

digestible? why, are you eating it? 
LOL


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 05:20
He's probably allergic to vinyl.

-------------
This message was brought to you by a proud supporter of the Deep State.


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 06:29
Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:



The only digestable song off this wimpy album is Comfortably Numb. Nuff said !!!Big smileWinkTongueSmile
CryCry Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh where are you Syd!!!!!CryCry



digestible? why, are you eating it? 
LOL


Do you know what figurative speech means ??!


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 06:31
Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:



The only digestable song off this wimpy album is Comfortably Numb. Nuff said !!!Big smileWinkTongueSmile
CryCry Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh where are you Syd!!!!!CryCry



digestible? why, are you eating it? 
LOL


Figurative language refers to the use of words in a way that deviates from the conventional order and meaning in order to convey a complicated meaning, colorful writing, clarity, or evocative comparison. It uses an ordinary sentence to refer to something without directly stating it.


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 06:33
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

He's probably allergic to vinyl.


I'm not, but you might well be !!


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 06:36
Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:



The only digestable song off this wimpy album is Comfortably Numb. Nuff said !!!Big smileWinkTongueSmile
CryCry Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh where are you Syd!!!!!CryCry



digestible? why, are you eating it? 
LOL


Figurative language refers to the use of words in a way that deviates from the conventional order and meaning in order to convey a complicated meaning, colorful writing, clarity, or evocative comparison. It uses an ordinary sentence to refer to something without directly stating it.

thank you Captain Obvious, you've saved us all. 
I was only joking, it's even funnier that you got annoyed with what I said (which I did not think it was possible, but anyway). LOL


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 06:40
Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:



The only digestable song off this wimpy album is Comfortably Numb. Nuff said !!!Big smileWinkTongueSmile
CryCry Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh where are you Syd!!!!!CryCry



digestible? why, are you eating it? 
LOL


Figurative language refers to the use of words in a way that deviates from the conventional order and meaning in order to convey a complicated meaning, colorful writing, clarity, or evocative comparison. It uses an ordinary sentence to refer to something without directly stating it.

thank you Captain Obvious, you've saved us all. 
I was only joking, it's even funnier that you got annoyed with what I said (which I did not think it was possible, but anyway). LOL

Wow !!! so now we have a guilty conscience, don't we ??!!LOLLOLLOLLOL


Posted By: nick_h_nz
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 06:48
Cristi was quite clearly joking, so the only one with egg on their face is you. 🤷🏻‍♂️

I find eggs digestible, but only in certain forms.

I do not like green eggs, though - ham or not.

Cristi vs Triptych is looking like it could be the new Cristi vs Paul.

Paul more or less rhymes with Wall, which is eggs in a form I enjoy. I find it easily digestible, and so good that I often come back for seconds. You can’t have any pudding I’d you don’t eat your meat, but honestly Wall is meaty enough to fill me up, without needing any pudding. 👍🏻



-------------
https://tinyurl.com/nickhnz-tpa" rel="nofollow - Reviewer for The Progressive Aspect


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 06:52
Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Cristi vs Triptych is looking like it could be the new Cristi vs Paul.


God no... 
Have I got the reputation of the one that argues all the time? LOL
I guess the nonsense some users go into here bothers me more than others. LOL


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 08:35
Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile

are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL

I’m presuming he’s meaning the Roger Water album of The Wall live in Berlin? 🤷🏻‍♂️

Exactly! I meant Roger Waters' The Wall: Live in Berlin album, so what I said makes perfect sense, which makes a nice change. Smile


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 08:47
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile

are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL

I’m presuming he’s meaning the Roger Water album of The Wall live in Berlin? 🤷🏻‍♂️

Exactly! I meant Roger Waters' The Wall: Live in Berlin album, so what I said makes perfect sense, which makes a nice change. Smile

awful live album, I agree with the overall rating it's got here on PA. 


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 08:52
Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

He's probably allergic to vinyl.


I'm not, but you might well be !!
Yeah, I gave up on vinyl ages ago. The vinyl craze is just a hoax, but don't tell that to my friend Catcher10. LOL  Seriously, you are one of few that I've ever seen disparage The Wall with such disdain!. It's actually kind of refreshing!

-------------
This message was brought to you by a proud supporter of the Deep State.


Posted By: Psychedelic Paul
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 09:03
Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile

are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL

I’m presuming he’s meaning the Roger Water album of The Wall live in Berlin? 🤷🏻‍♂️

Exactly! I meant Roger Waters' The Wall: Live in Berlin album, so what I said makes perfect sense, which makes a nice change. Smile

awful live album, I agree with the overall rating it's got here on PA. 
It appears Roger Waters' Live in Berlin album has come up against The Wall of indifference from you. Tongue 
 
Not surprisingly, I disagree. It's a brilliant Live album with a well-deserved 5-star rating from me. Thumbs Up


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 10:32
Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

He's probably allergic to vinyl.


I'm not, but you might well be !!
Yeah, I gave up on vinyl ages ago. The vinyl craze is just a hoax, but don't tell that to my friend Catcher10. LOL  Seriously, you are one of few that I've ever seen disparage The Wall with such disdain!. It's actually kind of refreshing!

The Wall as a whole is of little worth musically speaking, esp if we compare it to other more SERIOUS Floyd albums. Most people have played the record sales card when arguing about The Wall ! Frankly, I don't care if an album has sold millions of copies around the world....it just means that there are people who like to throw their hard-earned money out the window and not that there are people who really like and appreciate REAL music. But that's all fine with me. All I can say to round up this post is that Syd wouldn't have liked The Wall one single bit :)


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 10:34
Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Cristi was quite clearly joking, so the only one with egg on their face is you. 🤷🏻‍♂️

I find eggs digestible, but only in certain forms.

I do not like green eggs, though - ham or not.

Cristi vs Triptych is looking like it could be the new Cristi vs Paul.

Paul more or less rhymes with Wall, which is eggs in a form I enjoy. I find it easily digestible, and so good that I often come back for seconds. You can’t have any pudding I’d you don’t eat your meat, but honestly Wall is meaty enough to fill me up, without needing any pudding. 👍🏻


Again, no-one asked your opinion EGGHEAD Big smileLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL


Posted By: triptych
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 10:36
Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Cristi vs Triptych is looking like it could be the new Cristi vs Paul.


God no... 
Have I got the reputation of the one that argues all the time? LOL
I guess the nonsense some users go into here bothers me more than others. LOL
Really? The one that has the reputation of the one that argues all the time? I hadn't noticed LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOLLOL


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 10:37
Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile

are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL

I’m presuming he’s meaning the Roger Water album of The Wall live in Berlin? 🤷🏻‍♂️

Exactly! I meant Roger Waters' The Wall: Live in Berlin album, so what I said makes perfect sense, which makes a nice change. Smile

awful live album, I agree with the overall rating it's got here on PA. 
It appears Roger Waters' Live in Berlin album has come up against The Wall of indifference from you. Tongue 
 
Not surprisingly, I disagree. It's a brilliant Live album with a well-deserved 5-star rating from me. Thumbs Up

2.25 rating here on PA, so yeah, I agree. 


Posted By: Cristi
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 10:39
Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Cristi vs Triptych is looking like it could be the new Cristi vs Paul.


God no... 
Have I got the reputation of the one that argues all the time? LOL
I guess the nonsense some users go into here bothers me more than others. LOL
Really? The one that has the reputation of the one that argues all the time? I hadn't noticed. LOL
as long as you spew nonsense, I am gonna argue and disagree. Evil Smile


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 10:53
Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

Originally posted by triptych triptych wrote:

Originally posted by SteveG SteveG wrote:

He's probably allergic to vinyl.


I'm not, but you might well be !!
Yeah, I gave up on vinyl ages ago. The vinyl craze is just a hoax, but don't tell that to my friend Catcher10. LOL  Seriously, you are one of few that I've ever seen disparage The Wall with such disdain!. It's actually kind of refreshing!

The Wall as a whole is of little worth musically speaking, esp if we compare it to other more SERIOUS Floyd albums. Most people have played the record sales card when arguing about The Wall ! Frankly, I don't care if an album has sold millions of copies around the world....it just means that there are people who like to throw their hard-earned money out the window and not that there are people who really like and appreciate REAL music. But that's all fine with me. All I can say to round up this post is that Syd wouldn't have liked The Wall one single bit :)
is not the paranoia of The Wall's main character "Pink" a bit SERIOUS? And the album's social commentary? And songs like Good Bye Blue Sky, Mother, and Hey You not serious, either musically or lyrically?

-------------
This message was brought to you by a proud supporter of the Deep State.


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: January 21 2021 at 22:23
Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:

Originally posted by nick_h_nz nick_h_nz wrote:

Originally posted by Cristi Cristi wrote:

Originally posted by Psychedelic Paul Psychedelic Paul wrote:


The Wall isn't my favourite Pink Floyd album, but it is my favourite Roger Waters album. Smile


are you sure what you wrote there makes any sense? LOL


I’m presuming he’s meaning the Roger Water album of The Wall live in Berlin? 🤷🏻‍♂️


Exactly! I meant Roger Waters' The Wall: Live in Berlin album, so what I said makes perfect sense, which makes a nice change. Smile


awful live album, I agree with the overall rating it's got here on PA. 

It appears Roger Waters' Live in Berlin album has come up against The Wall of indifference from you. Tongue 
 
Not surprisingly, I disagree. It's a brilliant Live album with a well-deserved 5-star rating from me. Thumbs Up



2.25 rating here on PA, so yeah, I agree. 


As a whole, I guess a prefer the original album, or the newer album. The Berlin one has some really amazing parts, but some others that don't really work so well, mostly because of the use of so many guests. Still, things like What Shall we do Now, Another Brick in the Wall 3, In the Flesh sound really amazing. And the trial thing with the guests doing each characters parts sounds great... too bad the heavy guitars at the end were ruined in this version. I read once that Waters wanted Clapton as a guest too, but he declined... I don't know what he wanted him to play, but it would have been wonderful to have him play guitars and sing Gilmour's parts on Comfortably Numb.


Posted By: Hercules
Date Posted: January 22 2021 at 13:57
If it was a choice of being flayed alive or listening to The Wall, I would have to think about it.

The only track on the album I like is the wonderful Comfortably Numb.

The rest is utter bilge, especially the cringeworthy Another Brick in the Wall part 2 (despite Gilmour's attempt to rescue it with a lovely guitar solo).


-------------
A TVR is not a car. It's a way of life.


Posted By: AZF
Date Posted: January 23 2021 at 07:12
I feel it was the American tour of Animals that did what Punk was supposed to have done. In killing off Pink Floyd. The crowds got louder. This supposedly fragile music seemed unable to withstand people shouting or letting off fireworks.
The Who album "Who's Next" was taken from the better tracks of that infernal Lifehouse project.
Imagine if Pink Floyd were told to scrap The Wall and put an album of the best bits instead?
Would make a good EP!


Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: January 23 2021 at 08:07
Originally posted by AZF AZF wrote:

I feel it was the American tour of Animals that did what Punk was supposed to have done. In killing off Pink Floyd. The crowds got louder. This supposedly fragile music seemed unable to withstand people shouting or letting off fireworks.

I've seen Floyd three times. The first was the In The Flesh Tour 1977 at Cleveland Municipal Stadium. It's still one of the greatest concerts I've ever seen (and I've seen hundreds). I think anyone who was there would agree. So, I have no idea what you are talking about.


-------------
...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: IndigoStar
Date Posted: January 23 2021 at 08:53
It's the first Pink Floyd album I ever listened to and I still love it. 

I share the thoughts about Nick Mason being asleep through it though, but I think he's asleep for all their work.


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 23 2021 at 09:15
Originally posted by IndigoStar IndigoStar wrote:

It's the first Pink Floyd album I ever listened to and I still love it. 

I share the thoughts about Nick Mason being asleep through it though, but I think he's asleep for all their work.


-------------
This message was brought to you by a proud supporter of the Deep State.


Posted By: AZF
Date Posted: January 23 2021 at 09:46
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by AZF AZF wrote:

I feel it was the American tour of Animals that did what Punk was supposed to have done. In killing off Pink Floyd. The crowds got louder. This supposedly fragile music seemed unable to withstand people shouting or letting off fireworks.


I've seen Floyd three times. The first was the In The Flesh Tour 1977 at Cleveland Municipal Stadium. It's still one of the greatest concerts I've ever seen (and I've seen hundreds). I think anyone who was there would agree. So, I have no idea what you are talking about.


https://youtu.be/i05XNORlFM4
^
Try that. Rick left the band for a bit midtour and had to be begged back. Roger was really pissed off with the audience shouting and off fireworks.
I'm glad you enjoyed the show you saw. But for the band, it seemed nothing but the death knell of how their previous shows were.
That's what I'm talking about.


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: January 23 2021 at 20:38
Originally posted by AZF AZF wrote:

 
https://youtu.be/i05XNORlFM4
^
Try that. Rick left the band for a bit midtour and had to be begged back. Roger was really pissed off with the audience shouting and off fireworks.
I'm glad you enjoyed the show you saw. But for the band, it seemed nothing but the death knell of how their previous shows were.
That's what I'm talking about.

Thanks, that was an interesting watch.  But what I get from that is not that the album Animals itself precipitated the issues, but that they had become too big of a band for the kind of music they made. They took their music very seriously but neither the promoters nor the fans seemed to and that made them disillusioned.  Beatles retreated permanently to the studio when it became impossible to play live.  But for Floyd, that was understandably not an option.


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: January 25 2021 at 20:33
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

Originally posted by AZF AZF wrote:

I feel it was the American tour of Animals that did what Punk was supposed to have done. In killing off Pink Floyd. The crowds got louder. This supposedly fragile music seemed unable to withstand people shouting or letting off fireworks.


I've seen Floyd three times. The first was the In The Flesh Tour 1977 at Cleveland Municipal Stadium. It's still one of the greatest concerts I've ever seen (and I've seen hundreds). I think anyone who was there would agree. So, I have no idea what you are talking about.


I'm jealous, I would really love to have been able to see a show from that tour... but of course, there was the small problem that I wasn't born yet. I didn't get into Pink Floyd in time to know that I wanted to see them before they stopped touring (though I have seen Roger Waters a few times, and still wish Gilmour had come around here in order to get to see a show from him).


Posted By: olgaol3
Date Posted: February 18 2021 at 06:54
I agree with you


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: February 19 2021 at 12:48
I saw Floyd at MSG in NY for DSotM and WYWH. Missed them for Animals and the Wall, but the two I saw should hold me over.

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