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Possibly Underrated Bassists?

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Topic: Possibly Underrated Bassists?
Posted By: Cylli Kat (0fficial)
Subject: Possibly Underrated Bassists?
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 16:03
My apologies if this topic has been touched on prior to this...

I was just listening to Fates Warning's Perfect Symmetry and it struck me how really solid the playing of Joe DiBiase is.
So, I thought it might be nice to show some love for some possibly underappreciated bassists out there.
I'm interested in seeing your selections and who I've overlooked!


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Replies:
Posted By: Shadowyzard
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 16:06
Randy Coven!!! Not possibly, but definitely extremely underrated. R.I.P. BTW. He passed away several years ago. 


Posted By: Cylli Kat (0fficial)
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 16:49
Another player that comes to my mind is the late, great Charles Tumahai (Be Bop Deluxe).
In the pocket, or wandering 'round, that man could play!!!


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Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 17:23
Bryan Beller. The Aristocrats, Mike Keneally, solo, Joe Satriani, and others. Fierce player with a killer groove.


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 17:43
I donít know if Francis Moze is exactly underrated, but I do feel he is overlooked and overshadowed by other bassists, particularly in Magma. Yeah, maybe he is underrated in comparison to Top and Paganotti and Bussonet. And I like Moze for his Gong work. I donít know what the general consensus would be for people who know Moze work on how highly they would regard him on bass, and I donít recall reading disparaging comments about him, but, yes, he does get overshadowed. Maybe he is less showy generally, but I doubt many would not consider him to be competent. I canít really judge it well from a technical standpoint or have much data to say how people feel about him. But possibly underrated, oh yes, I do think so, and I strongly suspect he is most probably underrated by some. Or should that be Moze probably?

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Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 17:59
What springs directly to mind is Helmut Koellen of Triumvirat, who sadly left us on May 3rd, 1977. Unfairly in the shadow of big name players like Chris Squire and Greg Lake, Helmut was also very good at vocals, and six and twelve string guitar, as well! It is his prowess on the Rickenbacker bass guitar, though, that I find the most appealing of all. As a musician/singer/songwriter, the "soul" of Triumvirat, it must be said, but rarely mentioned in magazines or books devoted to bass players. I do what I can to generate interest in this "from the heart" musician. RIP, Helmut Koellen.


Posted By: JD
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 18:26
I don't know that Greg Lake was ever discussed as a great bass player. Now don't get me wrong. I think He WAS ! But he was thought of more as a singer and acoustic guitar player in my opinion. But I always pipe up during bass discussions to say "Just listen to it". Forget the keys and the drums and even the singing. Focus on that bass play. He was an incredible bassist.


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Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 18:37
Helmut Hattler.

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Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 18:50
Originally posted by Cylli Kat (0fficial) Cylli Kat (0fficial) wrote:

My apologies if this topic has been touched on prior to this...

I was just listening to Fates Warning's Perfect Symmetry and it struck me how really solid the playing of Joe DiBiase is.

"Monument" alone elevates Joe DiBiase above the run-of-the-mill. Great bass player. Perfect for Fates.

Originally posted by Cylli Kat (0fficial) Cylli Kat (0fficial) wrote:

Another player that comes to my mind is the late, great Charles Tumahai (Be Bop Deluxe). In the pocket, or wandering 'round, that man could play!!!

Indeed. He does not get enough cred.


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Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 18:51
Originally posted by JD JD wrote:

I don't know that Greg Lake was ever discussed as a great bass player. Now don't get me wrong. I think He WAS !

Don't worry, Greg Lake was an excellent bassist. I rate John Wetton above him, but both were excellent bassists whose vocals and songs got more attention.


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Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 18:58
The late Marcel Jacob of Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force and Talisman fame. This video collects some solo bass compositions (and straight-up solos). Some beautiful music here.






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Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 20:02
Originally posted by presdoug presdoug wrote:

What springs directly to mind is Helmut Koellen of Triumvirat, who sadly left us on May 3rd, 1977. Unfairly in the shadow of big name players like Chris Squire and Greg Lake, Helmut was also very good at vocals, and six and twelve string guitar, as well! It is his prowess on the Rickenbacker bass guitar, though, that I find the most appealing of all. As a musician/singer/songwriter, the "soul" of Triumvirat, it must be said, but rarely mentioned in magazines or books devoted to bass players. I do what I can to generate interest in this "from the heart" musician. RIP, Helmut Koellen.

Fantastic, Doug!!  Right on the money, he was amazing (I can say that as I saw them live). 

I'd suggest a couple:

a)  Mike Howlett, of Gong - check out his work on Gong's "You" LP 

b)  Lothar Meid, of Amon Duul II - great work on "Wolf City" and others, RIP! 


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I am not a Robot, I'm a FREE MAN!!


Posted By: Necrotica
Date Posted: November 12 2021 at 22:59
Thomas Miller of Symphony X was always one of my underrated favorites. While I like the band's current bassist Michael Lepond, something about Miller's work on Divine Wings of Tragedy is just on another level.

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Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 02:30
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Originally posted by presdoug presdoug wrote:

What springs directly to mind is Helmut Koellen of Triumvirat, who sadly left us on May 3rd, 1977. Unfairly in the shadow of big name players like Chris Squire and Greg Lake, Helmut was also very good at vocals, and six and twelve string guitar, as well! It is his prowess on the Rickenbacker bass guitar, though, that I find the most appealing of all. As a musician/singer/songwriter, the "soul" of Triumvirat, it must be said, but rarely mentioned in magazines or books devoted to bass players. I do what I can to generate interest in this "from the heart" musician. RIP, Helmut Koellen.

Fantastic, Doug!!  Right on the money, he was amazing (I can say that as I saw them live). 

I'd suggest a couple:

a)  Mike Howlett, of Gong - check out his work on Gong's "You" LP 

b)  Lothar Meid, of Amon Duul II - great work on "Wolf City" and others, RIP! 

Thanks so much, Chuck!  How lucky you were to have seen Helmut live.
         That Gong bassist is new to me, will check him out; Lothar Meid was great in AD 2 and also the debut album of Klaus Doldinger's Passport! 


Posted By: chopper
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 02:56
Originally posted by Cylli Kat (0fficial) Cylli Kat (0fficial) wrote:

Another player that comes to my mind is the late, great Charles Tumahai (Be Bop Deluxe).
In the pocket, or wandering 'round, that man could play!!!

Good call, brilliant bass player. ClapClapClapClapClap


Posted By: tszirmay
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 06:12
John G.Perry (Caravan, Quantum Jump, Ant Phillips, Aviator and solo) 
Mick Karn (Japan and solo)
John Jowitt (Arena, IQ, Drifting Sun, Rain)
Lee Pomeroy (Wakeman, Hackett and sessions galore)
Paul Webb (Talk Talk)
Ralphe Armstrong (Ponty, sessions) 
Percy Jones (Brand X, sessions)
Fabio Zuffanti (Finisterre, La Maschera di Cera) 

I have many more....



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Posted By: dwill123
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 06:13
Rarely do I ever hear Hadrien Feraud name mentioned.  First bass player in John McLaughlin & The 4th Dimension.




Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 09:43
Originally posted by tszirmay tszirmay wrote:

John G.Perry (Caravan, Quantum Jump, Ant Phillips, Aviator and solo) 
Mick Karn (Japan and solo)
John Jowitt (Arena, IQ, Drifting Sun, Rain)
Lee Pomeroy (Wakeman, Hackett and sessions galore)
Paul Webb (Talk Talk)
Ralphe Armstrong (Ponty, sessions) 
Percy Jones (Brand X, sessions)
Fabio Zuffanti (Finisterre, La Maschera di Cera)

Percy Jones is not underrated. One can make a case for any of the others.

I noticed "new bassist" John Jowitt immediately when I first heard IQ's Ever. Glad I was able to see Arena and see the Jowster get his bass on. Clap



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Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 09:49
Fabio Pignatelli of Goblin & Goblin Rebirth. The very definition of underrated. This man has recorded some of my favorite basslines.





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Posted By: dwill123
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 10:35
Another name not often mentioned even thou a little more known that some is Richard Bona.






Posted By: Grumpyprogfan
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 10:39
Fred Baker, played with Phil Miller, Pip Pyle, and others.


Posted By: Progishness
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 11:42
Ian Eyre - Curved Air 1970-71.


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Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 12:03
John Lodge - Moody Blues
John Glasscock - Carmen/Jethro Tull



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to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: miamiscot
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 20:34
Randy George - The Neal Morse Band
Ray Shulman - Gentle Giant
Justin Chancellor - Tool


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Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 21:06
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

...
a)  Mike Howlett, of Gong - check out his work on Gong's "You" LP 

b)  Lothar Meid, of Amon Duul II - great work on "Wolf City" and others, RIP! 

Hi,

Mike was always on the money and he could play and not worry about being up front or behind. He was really tight and careful and detailed and it showed many times. His work on some of the live albums is just as good, and we also did not see that he played with Pip, Pierre and then the S2S kid ... three very different drummers, and his playing still fit ... did we miss a beat? Never.

Lothar Meid is one of the great ones, that is ignored. His work on the MM Soundtrack is even better and shows some patience and touch that is not a part of most bass players ... it's about the silence and when not to play and still have a touch left to help propel the music forwards.

I seriously doubt that these two will get any credit. However there are/were several very nice choices, though I do not think they are necessarily the best. John G. Perry did an outstanding job with Caravan for one album and quit the bass it seems. Helmut Hattler is very special but I don't think that most folks here listen to Kraan, Guru Guru (in a couple of albums), and other bits here and there. The live Kraan albums are a good start for what this guy can do! 

I was thinking that Hugh Hopper should also be mentioned in this group.

Honorable mention ... thx to DE for putting John Glascock on this list. His work in Carmen was out of this world, and I'm not sure that he shined as much on JT albums as he did on Carmen, but maybe this was because he was not to be as close to the front as he was in Carmen.

Last addon. Dave Pegg of Fairport Convention and with Richard Thompson on a couple of live albums ... outstanding!


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Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: November 13 2021 at 23:33
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

...
a)  Mike Howlett, of Gong - check out his work on Gong's "You" LP 

b)  Lothar Meid, of Amon Duul II - great work on "Wolf City" and others, RIP! 

Hi,

Mike was always on the money and he could play and not worry about being up front or behind. He was really tight and careful and detailed and it showed many times. His work on some of the live albums is just as good, and we also did not see that he played with Pip, Pierre and then the S2S kid ... three very different drummers, and his playing still fit ... did we miss a beat? Never.

Lothar Meid is one of the great ones, that is ignored. His work on the MM Soundtrack is even better and shows some patience and touch that is not a part of most bass players ... it's about the silence and when not to play and still have a touch left to help propel the music forwards.

I seriously doubt that these two will get any credit. However there are/were several very nice choices, though I do not think they are necessarily the best. John G. Perry did an outstanding job with Caravan for one album and quit the bass it seems. Helmut Hattler is very special but I don't think that most folks here listen to Kraan, Guru Guru (in a couple of albums), and other bits here and there. The live Kraan albums are a good start for what this guy can do! 

I was thinking that Hugh Hopper should also be mentioned in this group.

Honorable mention ... thx to DE for putting John Glascock on this list. His work in Carmen was out of this world, and I'm not sure that he shined as much on JT albums as he did on Carmen, but maybe this was because he was not to be as close to the front as he was in Carmen.

Last addon. Dave Pegg of Fairport Convention and with Richard Thompson on a couple of live albums ... outstanding!

Thanks, M, great comments!  Also, thanks for Dave Pegg and Rich Thompson!  You listen!  

I have a soft-spot for self-taught bassists....Bob Fripp taught Boz Burrell how to play the instrument, and when he joined Bad Company, he brought the sweet sound of fretless bass to the AM radio waves!  

Geoffrey Hammond-Hammond of Jethro Tull was another "project" bassist, taught to play by Ian Anderson.  His work on Tull's albums was sublime, and he was nearly as flamboyant onstage as Ian!!  Great thread!!


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I am not a Robot, I'm a FREE MAN!!


Posted By: ExittheLemming
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 00:17
Underrated is maybe not the best terminology for this type of thing. Perhaps under appreciated or deserving more attention would be more apt? Anyways, let's not split hairs:

Lee Jackson (the Nice and Refugee)
Jim Rodford (Argent)
Jan Patrick Djivas (PFM)
Petr Vink (Finch)
Holger Czukay (Can)
Victor Wooten (Bela Fleck & the Flecktones)
Colin Hodgkinson (Back Door)

Non Prog
John Deacon (Queen)
Simon Gallup (the Cure)
Andy Rourke (the Smiths)
Les Pattinson (Echo & the Bunnymen)
Barry Adamson (Magazine, Bad Seeds and others)
Steve Hanley (the Fall)
Geezer Butler (Black Sabbath)
Steve Severin (Siouxsie & the Banshees)
Jean-Jacques Burnel (the Stranglers)
Fred Smith (Television)
Bruce Thomas (Elvis Costello & the Attractions)
Colin Moulding (XTC)
Bruce Moreland (Wall of Voodoo)






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Posted By: Guy Guden
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 03:34
  Jon Camp of RENAISSANCE, perhaps?  listening to the live 1976 Nottingham show which is on the new Scheherazade remaster release.  strong work there.  he was an early guest on SPACE PIRATE RADIO as well.

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Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 05:14


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Posted By: BrufordFreak
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 06:23
Steve Rodby. Ares Tavolazzi.



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https://progisaliveandwell.blogspot.com/


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 08:05
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

...
I have a soft-spot for self-taught bassists....Bob Fripp taught Boz Burrell how to play the instrument, and when he joined Bad Company, he brought the sweet sound of fretless bass to the AM radio waves!  

Geoffrey Hammond-Hammond of Jethro Tull was another "project" bassist, taught to play by Ian Anderson.  His work on Tull's albums was sublime, and he was nearly as flamboyant onstage as Ian!!  Great thread!!

Hi,

I'm not sure it was that these folks were taught by Bob or Ian ... more than likely those folks wanted a very specific touch of the bass on this or that passage which helped make the piece more attractive. The majority of bass players are too concerned with beat and the drum, than they are with the whole of the music in front of them, so a bass player being asked/told to do this or that is not out of the question (see note below) ... it only means that one person is much more attuned to what their music is about, which another player would not be, thus being asked/told to do this bit or that bit this or that way, is far out. But the "talent" inherent in the player himself/herself is the issue, and Boz went on to do even better work on the fretless which is a credit to his ability. Geoffrey had become one of the folks that added the "personality" to JT, which Ian slowly took out and replaced as his own vision and take on things, although it seems that Geoffrey left on his own. John G was a very nice substitution, but I think he lost the ability to be out front and drive the music, since Ian was the driver not any other musician! That's when I fell out of JT ... I thought the touch of "band" was gone. Still fine and really well done, but not half as valuable or important as the older stuff that we all love and still talk about. But that's not to say that JT albums were not good at all from then on. 

I think there is a lot more to the bass playing than we think about ... the ones that stand out are not just about the beat and staying with the drummer ... when you hear Dave Pegg with Richard Thompson in those live albums (specially Live More/Less), you will find that Dave is magnificent at adding to the space that Richard intentionally leaves open when taking his time on the piece or notes! Those versions, of "Night Comes In" and "Calvary Cross" still are the best I have ever heard, and I think that Dave Pegg is the difference.

Note: One of the worst bass lessons of all, is when a teacher tells you that you are rhythm, and have to play with the drums ... meaning that you learn your instrument without learning to hear and pay better attention to the rest of the music. In rock music, I suppose the simplest thing to say is stay on the drummer, but by the time you get to jazz and more free form music, staying with the drummer, means you can't play!


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Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 10:13
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

...
I have a soft-spot for self-taught bassists....Bob Fripp taught Boz Burrell how to play the instrument, and when he joined Bad Company, he brought the sweet sound of fretless bass to the AM radio waves!  

Geoffrey Hammond-Hammond of Jethro Tull was another "project" bassist, taught to play by Ian Anderson.  His work on Tull's albums was sublime, and he was nearly as flamboyant onstage as Ian!!  Great thread!!

Geoffrey had become one of the folks that added the "personality" to JT, which Ian slowly took out and replaced as his own vision and take on things. As such Geoffrey ended up in the scrap heap.

Your historical revisionism is laughable and dead wrong. Jeffrey Hammond left Tull on his own accord to continue his painting career (which was always his first concern, and he has been quite successful as an artist). Jeffrey even tried to rejoin the band in the late 80s,  "but the bass player declared himself unable to play the rather difficult music of Jethro Tull and decided to give up."

Actually, Ian and Jeffrey were great old school friends, and Ian included Jeffrey in several songs: "A song for Jeffrey", Jeffrey Goes to Leicester Square" and "For Michael Collins, Jeffrey and Me".

Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

John G was a very nice substitution, but he lost the ability to be out front and drive the music, since Ian was the driver not any other musician! That's when I fell out of JT ... I thought the touch of "band" was gone, and that Ian's version of things was not as strong or complete. Still fine and really well done, but not half as valuable or important as the older stuff that we all love and still talk about.

I would suggest that neither Jeffrey Hammond nor Glenn Cornick, both fine bass players, had the chops to play the bass lines found in Songs from the Wood or Heavy Horses. I would suggest further that the change you mention did not occur until after Stormwatch, when Ian fired John Evan, David (Dee) Palmer and Barriemore Barlow. They became more Ian-centric after that point and lost the magic.

Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

I think there is a lot more to the bass playing than we think about ... the ones that stand out are not just about the beat and staying with the drummer ... when you hear Dave Pegg with Richard Thompson in those live albums (specially Live More/Less), you will find that Dave is magnificent at adding to the space that Richard intentionally leaves open when taking his time on the piece or notes! Those versions, of "Night Comes In" and "Calvary Cross" still are the best I have ever heard, and I think that Dave Pegg is the difference.

Dave Pegg joined Tull after Glascock's death and remained as Tull's bass player for over 15 years while continuing to make albums with Fairport Convention. In fact, one of the best concerts I've seen was in 1988 when Fairport backed up Tull on tour. Pegg was onstage for the entirety of both band's sets. He was fantastic.


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to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 12:27
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

I would suggest that neither Jeffrey Hammond nor Glenn Cornick, both fine bass players, had the chops to play the bass lines found in Songs from the Wood or Heavy Horses. I would suggest further that the change you mention did not occur until after Stormwatch, when Ian fired John Evan, David (Dee) Palmer and Barriemore Barlow. They became more Ian-centric after that point and lost the magic.

I agree with both points re: bassists and post-Stormwatch Tull. I've long maintained the late John Glascock, who was taken far too soon, was the best bassist Tull ever had. I shudder when I wonder what all the Broadsword songs would sound like with his basslines.


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Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 12:32
Originally posted by ExittheLemming ExittheLemming wrote:

Underrated is maybe not the best terminology for this type of thing. Perhaps under appreciated or deserving more attention would be more apt? Anyways, let's not split hairs:

Lee Jackson (the Nice and Refugee)
Jim Rodford (Argent)
Jan Patrick Djivas (PFM)
Petr Vink (Finch)
Holger Czukay (Can)
Victor Wooten (Bela Fleck & the Flecktones)
Colin Hodgkinson (Back Door)

Non Prog
John Deacon (Queen)
Simon Gallup (the Cure)
Andy Rourke (the Smiths)
Les Pattinson (Echo & the Bunnymen)
Barry Adamson (Magazine, Bad Seeds and others)
Steve Hanley (the Fall)
Geezer Butler (Black Sabbath)
Steve Severin (Siouxsie & the Banshees)
Jean-Jacques Burnel (the Stranglers)
Fred Smith (Television)
Bruce Thomas (Elvis Costello & the Attractions)
Colin Moulding (XTC)
Bruce Moreland (Wall of Voodoo)

Some of these bassists will never get the attention they arguably deserve because some of these bands are no longer on the radar. You also have two who were in very high-profile bands that will never fall off the radar.

Vic Wooten is regarded by jazz/fusion aficionados as one of the best.

Nice to see a mention for Colin Hodgkinson! He's really good.




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Posted By: timothy leary
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 12:54
John Ferrara from Consider the Source


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: November 14 2021 at 19:50
Originally posted by The Dark Elf The Dark Elf wrote:

...
Your historical revisionism is laughable and dead wrong. Jeffrey Hammond left Tull on his own accord to continue his painting career (which was always his first concern, and he has been quite successful as an artist).
...

Hi,

Updated and cleaned up per your comments. I'm not afraid to be wrong and definitely not stupid enough to know when to correct things. If I'm wrong, I'm wrong and will try to fix things the best I can, and did here!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... favoritism is not an artistic merit! www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: November 15 2021 at 01:04
Originally posted by Cylli Kat (0fficial) Cylli Kat (0fficial) wrote:

Another player that comes to my mind is the late, great Charles Tumahai (Be Bop Deluxe).
In the pocket, or wandering 'round, that man could play!!!

that was a fantastic band generally. I've probably listened to them as much as anyone in the last 12 months or so. Bill Nelson is one of the great rock talents , just too good to be pigeon holed!


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: November 15 2021 at 01:10
Steve Babb gets better with age and I'm not aware of a better current Rickenbacker player now that Chris Squire has left us. The latest Glass Hammer album is a real stonker by the way!
Another guy who surely deserves a mention is Gregory Spawton (Big Big Train). Maybe not that 'showy' but rock solid as it comes and he plays with NDV so he must be good!


Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: November 15 2021 at 23:01
Must-read interview with Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond of Jethro Tull!

https://www.greatbritishlife.co.uk/people/jethro-tull-guitarist-jeffrey-hammond-7012490" rel="nofollow - https://www.greatbritishlife.co.uk/people/jethro-tull-guitarist-jeffrey-hammond-7012490


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Posted By: Ronstein
Date Posted: November 16 2021 at 02:52
Scott Thunes is pretty handy!!


Posted By: Cylli Kat (0fficial)
Date Posted: November 16 2021 at 04:17
Originally posted by ExittheLemming ExittheLemming wrote:

Underrated is maybe not the best terminology for this type of thing. Perhaps under appreciated or deserving more attention would be more apt? Anyways, let's not split hairs:



I mistakenly titled the thread, but tried to rectify it in the OP:

"So, I thought it might be nice to show some love for some possibly underappreciated bassists out there."

Nice list of players that you had, BTW!


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I'm actually this guy: https://www.progarchives.com/Collaborators.asp?id=17597" rel="nofollow - Cylli Kat


Posted By: tszirmay
Date Posted: November 16 2021 at 07:30
Originally posted by verslibre verslibre wrote:

Fabio Pignatelli of Goblin & Goblin Rebirth. The very definition of underrated. This man has recorded some of my favorite basslines.




Pignatelli is a monster , one of my all-time faves . Clap


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Posted By: Lewian
Date Posted: November 16 2021 at 07:42
I'd like to mention Klaus-Peter Matziol of Eloy, Jon Camp of Renaissance, Hansford Rowe of Pierre Moerlen's Gong, and all (?) Magma bassists.  


Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 16 2021 at 11:17
Originally posted by tszirmay tszirmay wrote:

[QUOTE=verslibre]Fabio Pignatelli of Goblin & Goblin Rebirth. The very definition of underrated. This man has recorded some of my favorite basslines.

Pignatelli is a monster , one of my all-time faves . Clap

We are brothers-in-arns! Clap


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Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: November 16 2021 at 11:18
Originally posted by Lewian Lewian wrote:

I'd like to mention Klaus-Peter Matziol of Eloy

Yes!! I can't believe I forgot to mention KPM. Eloy would not be the same without him. Clap


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Posted By: ExittheLemming
Date Posted: November 21 2021 at 23:25
Originally posted by Cylli Kat (0fficial) Cylli Kat (0fficial) wrote:

Originally posted by ExittheLemming ExittheLemming wrote:

Underrated is maybe not the best terminology for this type of thing. Perhaps under appreciated or deserving more attention would be more apt? Anyways, let's not split hairs:



I mistakenly titled the thread, but tried to rectify it in the OP:

"So, I thought it might be nice to show some love for some possibly underappreciated bassists out there."

Nice list of players that you had, BTW!

Sorry, I missed this and yes you did tweak the terminology


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Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: November 21 2021 at 23:56
Originally posted by Guy Guden Guy Guden wrote:

  Jon Camp of RENAISSANCE, perhaps?  listening to the live 1976 Nottingham show which is on the new Scheherazade remaster release.  strong work there.  he was an early guest on SPACE PIRATE RADIO as well.

Definitely Jon Camp!  He was one of the 1970s "Rickenbacker Masters" including Squire, Rutherford, Ray Bennett (Flash), Gary Strater (Starcastle) and a few others I can't recall this late at night! 

Speaking of which, I'm quite remiss in not nominating my friend, bassist Ray Bennett of Flash!  He was a flat-mate of Chris Squire in London, and they seemed to cross-pollenate each other's style!  Here, dig! 






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