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Steve Wilson, November 2005

Printed From: Progarchives.com
Category: Progressive Music Lounges
Forum Name: Interviews
Forum Description: Original interviews with Prog artists (which are exclusive to Prog Archives)
URL: http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=14590
Printed Date: January 18 2020 at 21:47
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Topic: Steve Wilson, November 2005
Posted By: maani
Subject: Steve Wilson, November 2005
Date Posted: November 17 2005 at 22:11

Steve Wilson is a very busy man.  He is planning another Blackfield collaboration soon, expects to continue collaborating with Opeth, and has other projects in the works as well.  And, oh yes – he also happens to continue to be the guitarist, songwriter, front man and chief inspiration for a little old band called Porcupine Tree.

 

I recently had the privilege of seeing PT live, and was amazed at how faithfully they are able to recreate their recorded music in concert.  Indeed, there seemed to be an even greater sense of “urgency” and complexity in the songs when performed in the immediacy of the live setting.  At the show, I was able to corral Mr. Wilson’s manager, and asked if he would be willing to arrange an interview with Mr. Wilson.  He did so, and I want to thank him for his time, patience and assistance in this regard.

 

Needless to say, I also want to express my sincere gratitude to Mr. Wilson, who took time out from his insanely hectic schedule to answer each and every query in an honest and forthright manner.  His time is greatly appreciated, and his honesty and directness are truly refreshing.

 

Here is the “official” Prog Archives interview with Steve Wilson.

 

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P: Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background, especially musically.  For example, when did you start playing guitar?  Composing?


SW:  The first thing that actually inspired me to take an interest in music was my parent's listening tastes.  When I was 7 or 8 years old I heard albums such as Donna Summer's Love to Love You Baby (still one of my favourite albums) and Dark Side of the Moon.  I became fascinated by the whole process of making records.  The first music that actually inspired me to make it myself was the early 80's New Wave of British Heavy Metal scene, bands such as Diamond Head, Saxon and Iron Maiden.  So the first band I had was a school band in this style called Paradox, with whom I played guitar and wrote most of the songs - this would have been when I was about 12-13 years old.

P: Who were your favorite groups as a young adult?  Who were your earliest influences as a guitarist?  As a songwriter?


SW:  I have a hard time answering that question.  I suppose I wasn't really so interested in groups, more in the auteurs who were responsible for creating a whole sound and style of their own - the "architects" of recorded music, people like Zappa, Pete Townsend, Jeff Lynne, Robert Fripp, Brian Wilson, Miles Davis, Roger Waters.... If I had to pick one artist whose music has meant so much to me right through my life and still touches me deeply, I think it would be Nick Drake.

P: What were your earliest professional musical experiences?


SW:  As a professional musician, No-Man was the band/project that got me started and enabled me to make music for a living for the first time.  We signed to Bjork's label One Little Indian in 1990 and started to pick up a lot of good press in the UK.

P: What were you doing immediately preceding the formation of Porcupine Tree?


SW:  I was working with No-Man.

P: Tell us about the formation of Porcupine Tree: when, where, who, how.


SW:  At first it started almost as a joke, or at least it was created to imitate various groups I liked from the sixties and seventies.  I was inspired to do this by XTC's alter egos The Dukes of Stratosphear.  It was only after I got a record deal and started to issue music commercially that I decided to try to make PT a more serious project, and less nostalgic.  I realised that there was an opportunity to make music which was rooted in the classic album music of the past, but looking firmly to the future.  The breakthrough PT piece in this respect was the 30-minute single Voyage 34 which fused ambient trance (then very popular thanks to artists like The Orb and Future Sound of London) with space rock.  PT continued as a solo project until 1994 when the band line-up came together for the first time, primarily to play the existing music live.

P: Among some of the influences that our members hear in Porcupine Tree’s music are Pink Floyd, King Crimson and Dream Theater.  Are these accurate?  If not, who would you say are the bands or artists that have influenced Porcupine Tree, beyond your own personal influences?

 

SW:  I really don't think it's relevant to talk about influences on the band at this stage in our career.  For many years PT have striven to be Porcupine Tree, unlike anyone else.  Also, inspiration comes from so many different sources - movies, books, life, experience....etc....and on top of this there are 4 very distinct personalities with the band.  At least 2 of the 4 members wouldn't listen to any of the groups you mention, and never did, and I think I can say that none of us ever listened to a Dream Theater record!

P: With regard to songwriting, how much is yours and how much is collaborative?  Also, how much is done "in studio" - i.e., as a result of "noodling," "jamming," etc. - and how much is "already written" when you go into the studio?


SW:  Historically, it's almost always been myself coming in with a very worked out set of songs/demos and a structure for the record, but actually this will probably change for the next record, which we intend to be more of a collaborative effort.

P: Many of our members are musicians, and many play in bands. Can you describe some of the guitars and equipment you use in Porcupine Tree and/or at home?


SW:  Apple computer running Logic Audio software, Digidesign Mix TDM system, EXS24 virtual sampler, Apogee Trak2 Mic Pre Amp/A-D convertor, Neumann U87 microphone, Paul Reed Smith Custom 22 guitars, Gibson Les Paul, Line6 XT POD, Marshall/Bad Cat Amplification.

P: Our site defines “prog rock” broadly as “A style that combines rock, non-rock (i.e., classical, folk et al), psychedelic and literary elements.”  And while we believe that it also often includes elements such as “shifting time signatures” and extensive use of keyboards, we believe that other important elements include a certain approach to composition (more “scored” than “linear”), with what might be termed “evolving musical themes,” and, perhaps as important as anything else, the “conscious” use of the studio (production) as an element in creating atmospheres and textures.  Would you comment on all this - i.e., the concept of “prog rock” in general, as well as how you feel Porcupine Tree “fits” into the genre?


SW:  I can't really answer this question as PT has always tried to avoid any generic classification - we make "porcupine tree" music, I guess.  These days I'm not really sure I know what "progressive" means, or if it matters, except that most of the music I hear referred to as "prog-rock" seems the opposite to me - formulaic, regressive, and very poorly executed.  But on the other hand, when I hear bands like The Mars Volta and Sigur Ros, there is a certain spirit that I associate with the original wave of ambitious album-oriented music from the 70's, with a very contemporary twist.

P: Many members consider many of your lyrics “dark.”  Would you agree?  If so, why?  Do you generally consider yourself a “dark” person, e.g., more a pessimist than an optimist?


SW:  I would certainly agree that the lyrics tend to be on the melancholic side, but writing for me is a kind of cathartic process during which I exorcise that side of me, and I think I'm generally a pretty happy person!

P: When you write, do you generally start with lyrics and add music, or do you come up with musical ideas and add lyrics later?


SW:  No rules - a song can start with lyrics, music, guitar, piano, a drum loop, a sample, a bass line...etc....

P: Are there any places, things, ideas, etc. that tend to influence you more than others in your lyric and/or song writing?


SW:  Yes, regret and loss tend to be the subjects I keep coming back to these days.

P: Can you tell us a little about your other project, Blackfield?  Particularly, how it came about, and whether we can look forward to more?


SW:  Blackfield is a collaboration with Israeli singer-songwriter Aviv Geffen - both myself and Aviv write, produce and play most of the instruments between us. We are planning to make a second record early on 2006.

P: Can you also tell us how you got involved with Opeth, what your role is, and whether you will continue to collaborate with them?


SW:  Opeth were fans of PT and I was very impressed with their album Still Life, so I agreed to work with them on an album which became Blackwater Park.  Myself and Mikael hope to collaborate on a project at some time, plus I hope I can continue to work with Opeth on their future recordings.  I think my favorite role is creating in the studio - making records, creating sounds, and mixing are what I believe I do best, so I enjoy collaborating with other artists where that is the sole extent of my job.  I'm proud of many of these collaborations, but if I had to choose two that I'm especially pleased with they would be Anja Garbarek's Smiling and Waving, and Opeth's Blackwater Park.  These 2 albums were done almost back to back, and could not be more different, but still I believe that they contain some of my most creative and sympathetic work.  In both cases my contribution helped to bring the artist to a completely new and stronger phase of their creativity.  As a producer that really is as much as you can hope for.

P:  Is there anything that you would like to add for our members?  Any info about Porcupine Tree, or about yourself, your feelings, thoughts, ideas in any regard?

SW:  No, I think that about covers it.

P:  Well, thank you so much for taking the time to answer our queries.  I know I speak for almost the entire membership when I say that we very much look forward to new music from Porcupine Tree, Blackfield and Opeth.  And, of course, we wish you continued personal and professional success!

 

SW:  Thank you.  Best of luck to Prog Archives as well.




Replies:
Posted By: stonebeard
Date Posted: November 17 2005 at 23:37

Great job, Maani!

And it's good to see you here once again, even if briefly.



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http://soundcloud.com/drewagler" rel="nofollow - My soundcloud. Please give feedback if you want!


Posted By: mortem
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 00:03
Excellent read :) good job man.
Glad to see that we're still having Wilson and Opeth working together in the future

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http://www.last.fm/user/m0rtem/ - My Last.fm


Posted By: Destrio
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 00:16

awesome, just awesome



Posted By: TheProgtologist
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 00:27

Great interview,very well done

I can't wait to hear some more Blackfield.

And it sounds like Steven or the rest of PT aren't fans of Dream Theater!!



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Posted By: John Gargo
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 08:15

Yeah, I had a good chuckle when Wilson ASSURED the reader that nobody listened to Dream Theater... 

Great interview!



Posted By: Marc Baum
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 08:37
Very interestening interview. Great job Maani!

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"All you need to do is sit back, and acquire the taste." - GENTLE GIANT


Posted By: Easy Livin
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 08:47
Well done Maani, great interview.Clap


Posted By: nimrodel
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 10:02


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We want... a shrubbery!


Posted By: sleeper
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 10:26
Impressive and enlightening interview manni, thanks

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Spending more than I should on Prog since 2005



Posted By: Sean Trane
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 10:43


Posted By: Arteum
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 11:51
Arrogant b*****d that he is, Steve Wilson!

- "I hear referred to as "prog-rock" seems the opposite to me - formulaic, regressive, and very poorly executed."

- "No, I think that about covers it."

We cannot really poke at him and say his music is poorly executed, but he shouldn't imply with all his entity that PT is the greatest band on Earth (great as it is)!

Further, I salute Maani for his effort, but I must say the interview is, in fact, poorly done. He apparently just jotted down some obvious questions on paper before the interview and then Steve Wilson replied to them. Notice that Maani never reacted to Steve Wilson's replies, never tried to clarify certain points in his interviewee's quite shocking revelations ("never listened to DT" -- I don't believe this, I think he's just bluffing), never sidetracked from the "written down" questions (as a professional interviewer would surely do!).

And one more thing, Maani: prog-rock is not a genre, it is simply the highest standard in rock-oriented music.

I never agree with Maani



Posted By: Bt-Tor
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 12:57
Steven Wilson said:

I hear referred to as "prog-rock" seems the opposite to me - formulaic, regressive, and very poorly executed.
"

---------------------------------------------------------- ------------------

He might have a point here in terms of certain throwbacks...
Progressive Rock means to progress in one's music, if you're out there to sound like Yes or Genesis well your not really progressing are you...


Posted By: Bt-Tor
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 12:58
Maani,

Solid interview by the way, well-thought out and insightful!


Posted By: Drew
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 14:04

Awesome information

Wilson is one of the best...no doubt



Posted By: sbrushfan
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 16:12
Quite well done, Maani.  I enjoyed reading it, and I think you should be encouraged to do more interviews with other prog artists.  How's about one with, say, Howe, Hackett or even Peter Gabriel?  Fish, perhaps?

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Some world views are spacious, and some are merely spaced...


Posted By: Tony R
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 18:14

Nice work Maani.Clap

Keep 'em coming!



Posted By: FishyMonkey
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 19:35
Kinda arrogant-sounding...but oh well, PTree is still my favorite band ever. Great interview!

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http://www.last.fm/user/FishyMonkey/?chartstyle=artists">


Posted By: maani
Date Posted: November 18 2005 at 22:09

Arteum:

Admittedly, it is not easy to do "back and forths" via e-mail, due to both time and logistics.  I have never purported to do so.  If that opportunity presents itself in future interviews, then I will most certainly take advantage of it.

That said, sometimes it is even more revealing when a person is not given the opportunity to "justify" or "rationalize" a statement or position.  Still, were I able to do interviews by phone, I would of course ask for clarification if something seemed to require it.

Peace.



Posted By: Chris S
Date Posted: November 19 2005 at 03:44
Thanks Maani...great to catch a glimpse. Imagine if all the interviewees filled our boring expectations!!! Steve Wilson is a rae talent for sure

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<font color=Brown>Music - The Sound Librarian

...As I venture through the slipstream, between the viaducts in your dreams...[/COLOR]


Posted By: DeadGhost
Date Posted: November 19 2005 at 19:30

good interview!! very interesting

 

BTW, i'm doing a research about PT (on English class)... could someone please tell me when Colin Edwin (the bassist) was born? I know all birth dates of the other members but him



Posted By: StumpyJoe
Date Posted: November 19 2005 at 20:40
I've read many Steven Wilson interviews that date from the early PT days until the present and it's seems most people ask him the same questions. He's rather sick of the Pink Floyd comparisons and the labeling of PT's music as progressive rock, so that usually shows up in the interviews. It was great to hear that SW is a fan of Nick Drake, as I don't recall him mentioning that before.


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"You can’t really dust for vomit."


Posted By: Nipsey88
Date Posted: November 20 2005 at 10:37
Great job Maani! Really enjoyed reading that.

...But who's Steven Wilson?


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http://www.last.fm/user/Nipsey88/?chartstyle=myspace02" rel="nofollow">



Posted By: threefates
Date Posted: November 20 2005 at 19:24
Great job Maani.  Was that interview done at the Town Hall show... because I was there and actually got to have a conversation with Steve Wilson's parents who were also there.  Which reminds me, I've got to send Colin some pictures I promised... Darn!  I forgot.

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THIS IS ELP


Posted By: Tholomyes
Date Posted: November 20 2005 at 19:32
Steven Wilson likes The Mars Volta


Posted By: thefalafelking
Date Posted: November 20 2005 at 19:59

StumpyJoe: It was great to hear that SW is a fan of Nick Drake

No-man covered a Nick Drake song on their Speakalbum, he's an influence to both wilson and tim bowness

 



Posted By: Jim Garten
Date Posted: November 21 2005 at 03:49
Great interview with a less than forthcoming interviewee, Maani; SW can occasionally come across as arrogant & condescending, but there's a good reason for this - he is arrogant & condescending.

That said, he is also one of the most significant musician/composer/producers of modern times within our chosen "genre" (sorry, Steve), and has always hated the label "progressive rock".

Incidentally, does anyone know where I can get a copy of "Voyage 34" - I like the description SW gave to this & it sounds right up my street!

I think that about covers it.

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Jon Lord 1941 - 2012


Posted By: memowakeman
Date Posted: November 21 2005 at 13:25

GOOD JOB MAANI

STEVEN WILSON RULES



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Follow me on twitter @memowakeman


Posted By: arqwave
Date Posted: November 21 2005 at 20:12

Nice, congratulations, great effort maani, is good to know something about you... i consider Steven Wilson a quite impressive guy that knows exactly what he wants and does exactly the same. Having a conversation with a guy so focused into what he does for a living is quite difficult, beacuse he might sound arrogant. I agree that progressive music is a consequence of a constant searching and improvement, but like Duke Ellington said: there's just two kinds of music: bad music and good music.

peace



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between darkness and light


Posted By: Starette
Date Posted: November 22 2005 at 01:53
Fantastic interview  Steven Wilson is a wise and logical man...so to speak

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50 tonne angel falls to the earth...


Posted By: Cinema
Date Posted: November 22 2005 at 21:28
What an egotistical, arrogant, narcissistic SOB. While Maani
did a great job of interviewing Mr. I'm-a-rock-star-so-I'm-much-better-
than-you, the interview was ultimately pointless because of Wilson's
unbriddled conceit.

Open note to Steve Wilson: You're only 'famous' to a small--very small--
group of people. Outside of those folks, no one has ever heard of you, nor
does anybody care who you are.


Posted By: Lindsay Lohan
Date Posted: November 23 2005 at 05:29
Steven Wilson is better on pop/metal that on prog


Posted By: wrax
Date Posted: November 23 2005 at 08:17
You can buy a copy at www.play.com for £6.99 inc delivery (at least in Europe).  It's one of my fave PT CDs.


Posted By: Starette
Date Posted: November 23 2005 at 20:43
Ouch- SOMEBODYdoesn't like Porcupine Tree

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50 tonne angel falls to the earth...


Posted By: Cinema
Date Posted: November 23 2005 at 21:23
^ Actually, my feelings have nothing to do with PT; just Steve Wilson. I can't
stand when people have a better-than-thou view of themselves, such as
Steve Wilson does. He needs to get over himself. I've read many an interview
with him, and his arrogance and conceit are nearly suffocating.


Posted By: necronomicon
Date Posted: November 25 2005 at 10:50
sometimes the ego is helpul when you want to create. is helpul when you believe in something that maybe no one believes. and when you are always focused in what you believe, you tend to lose that feeling of being considerative with interviews like this.( i mean, is not personal, but a lot of interviews that i've seen or reading are like this. for example the one in the King Crimson webpage, about a girl asking why Fripp didnt do autographs. thats stupid.)

i can´t imagine Waters being considerative in any interview. for f***s sake!




Posted By: Swinton MCR
Date Posted: November 25 2005 at 15:55

Good Interview Maani - But Mr Wilson - Doesn't mention his first proper Band - Karma, I still have some of their tapes - My best mate of the time, a Mr Roger paterson - used to be his northern England contact. Roger and I went to stay at Mr Wilsons Parents House in the early eighties , I remember he was really into Rush at the time though Floyd were probably still his favourite at that time. I think his interview is a little bit arrogant in parts...He should realise that his CD's like The sky moves sideways are VERY Floyd influenced...and thus could be called regressive........

I'd like to meet him again and wonder if he remembers our brief stay at his parents gaffe ?



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Play me my song, here it comes again


Posted By: memowakeman
Date Posted: November 28 2005 at 12:03

but... i cant understand why Wilson hasn´t heard any Dream Theater record

 



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Follow me on twitter @memowakeman


Posted By: Andrew Vernon
Date Posted: November 30 2005 at 09:27
I don't think he sounds arrogant, probably just pissed off with the same questions over and over, no disrespect to Manni there though.

He does a lot of stuff. Ever heard of Bass Communion? A very VERY excellent ambient project Steve started back in the 80's I think. He's not just into this type of music or that type of music, he's into MUSIC.

So when he's being pigeonholed, I can understand him sort of wanting to lash out. I'd be (and am) exactly the same.

I can imagine what it's like for him. I write guitar music, ambient music, glitchy-Satan music, calm cool trip-hop, drum and bass, a bit of techno..... so many different types of stuff.

So if someone refers to me as just an ambient artist... It feels a bit sh*t, y'know?

Has anyone watched the video's on the Porcupine Tree website? Watch them, he speaks a little about what direction he's heading in, and he mentions that stuff like the Sky Moves Sideways are being put in the record box for a while, because they're so sick of playing them live.

My mood changes, but I much prefer Deadwing to Sky Moves Sideways at the moment.


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over thinking, over analyzing separates the body from the mind.

feed my will to feel this moment, urging me to cross the line.

reaching out to embrace whatever may come.


Posted By: maani
Date Posted: December 02 2005 at 18:26

threefates:

Yes.  Sorry I missed you there.  Would have been nice to hook up.  Howz trix?

Peace.



Posted By: valravennz
Date Posted: December 02 2005 at 18:34

Nice interview Maani - though SW did not seem all that forth coming - not an easy person to interview but all kudos for your great efforts.

and it is great to see you on-line and the quick not from Threefates - has made my day

Cheers



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"Music is the Wine that fills the cup of Silence"
- Robert Fripp




Posted By: beebs
Date Posted: December 03 2005 at 19:50

 Thanks alot for posting that interview, maani. I as a newling to Porcupine Tree thank you. I gleaned some very interesting insights into the man and his creative processes reading what he had to say.

 Greatly appreciated your taking the time to post it!!



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"Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of one's own mind" * Ralph Waldo Emerson


Posted By: moncholo
Date Posted: December 22 2005 at 11:24

weird, i though that he was going to be involved in a project with Âkerfeldt and Portnoy.... but he doesn't seem to like DT THAT much...soooo........



Posted By: 70sSoundquality
Date Posted: December 23 2005 at 16:33
Wow, what a boring interview. This Steve has nothing of real interest to say. I have seen his band live and I must say, it was just as predictable and yawn inducing as this interview. 


Posted By: rudess
Date Posted: January 01 2006 at 13:20
I think that SW and PT have probably listened to quite a bit of Dream Theater since it was not so long ago(2000 I think) that PT were a support band for DT.


Posted By: cometoffire
Date Posted: January 02 2006 at 17:17
Well, I must say that I've read a lot of interviews with SW, and this is isn't
one of the best (sorry Maani!) - he sounds kinda tired. Usually he's very
entertaining (Metal Hammer just voted SW one of their best interviewees
of 2005 for example). It seems
like this was done by email and those kind of interviews
can be a pretty cold and humourless read. But the only thing I can see
that could be interpreted
as arrogant is the fact that he tries to avoid being dragged into the "how
do you define progressive" and "what are your influences" questions. He
sounds a bit weary of this and I don't blame him. Plus I think he would be
the first to admit that Sky Moves Sideways was made at a time when PT
were considerably more derivative than now - I've seen him refer to it as
their "Pink Floyd blueprint" album! Regarding Dream Theater, while
I've seen SW enthuse about bands like Meshuggah and Opeth, I've never
seen him mention DT or any of their albums so it's possible that he really
just isn't into them. Personally I can't hear any influence from them in the
music of PT. On the other hand I know he has worked with Jordan Rudess,
and Mike Portnoy is supposed to be involved in his collaboration with
Mikael Akefelt, so I don't know how that fits in.

Hey is it possible that you could do another interview with the man in
person next time? I'm sure you'd get a lot more out of him that way.


Posted By: threefates
Date Posted: January 05 2006 at 11:06

Actually last year Jordan also played with SW when he replaced the keyboardist for Blackfield at a NYC show... and then Jordan's side thing with drummer Rod Morgenstein, opened for Porcupine Tree on a few of their NE USA shows last year.

And yet SW still hasn't listened to any DT... oh well!

And to Maani:  yep, too bad we didn't see each other at the show.. You could of met Jon!  The next big shows we're planning are the two Dave Gilmour shows in NYC, two in Chicago and two at the Royal Albert Hall in London.  Dave's gonna think we're a part of his road crew after this...



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THIS IS ELP


Posted By: filipensses
Date Posted: February 06 2006 at 14:15
Actually, SW didn't say he haven't heard DT, he said none of PT members have ever heard a DT record...it's subtle, but it's different.


Posted By: BookAboutSalad
Date Posted: April 10 2006 at 16:40

Standard review but I liked it, good job but nothing more

I agree with a lot of you ppl, he sounded very tired and boring, maybe even arrogant. Probably he's tired of doing interviews or something. I doubt that he is an arrogant person... but who knows? And does it care? There's a lot of idiots making wonderful music



Posted By: pentagram_man63
Date Posted: May 06 2006 at 14:55
Thanks for the interview with this genius!

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http://folklorelegend.dmusic.com


Posted By: cscrutinizer
Date Posted: June 22 2006 at 18:06

SW:  I really don't think it's relevant to talk about influences on the band at this stage in our career.  For many years PT have striven to be Porcupine Tree, unlike anyone else.  Also, inspiration comes from so many different sources - movies, books, life, experience....etc....and on top of this there are 4 very distinct personalities with the band.  At least 2 of the 4 members wouldn't listen to any of the groups you mention, and never did, and I think I can say that none of us ever listened to a Dream Theater record!

Oh jeeze... this is such a bogus answer that many artists put forth to depict their originality. I really dig PT, but they are not the most original band in the world. The Pink Floyd influences are pretty obvious, and you can easily sing the lyrics of "Comfortably Numb" to the music of "The Sky Moves Sideways (Phase I)".
 
But I guess this makes for a better answer than a littany of bands (which would obviously include Pink Floyd).
 
I think sometimes listing bands as influences can impress the reader -- if they are bands that sound nothing like the influenced band... If he said Ethel Merman was a huge influence, I would be perplexed, amazed, and confused...
 
But it sounds cool and postmodern to dodge the influence issue... It reminds me of a lot of indie rock bands with progressive leanings, who claim the same thing, but are really just rehashing Crimson riffs... and in that case, most of the audience thinks what they are doing is original, since they are 17 years old...


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: September 05 2006 at 20:48
Miserable b*****d Wilson.


Posted By: OpethGuitarist
Date Posted: September 05 2006 at 20:50


Originally posted by swilson swilson wrote:

Miserable b*****d Wilson.




true that


LOL


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back from the dead, i will begin posting reviews again and musing through the forums


Posted By: ResidentAlien
Date Posted: September 20 2006 at 01:14
Originally posted by swilson swilson wrote:

Miserable b*****d Wilson.



AHAHAHAH!  That made my day, that seriously did.  Smile

Well, you rule and can't wait to see you and PT in 2 weeks....


Posted By: tigerfan5
Date Posted: September 25 2006 at 16:20
Originally posted by cscrutinizer cscrutinizer wrote:

<P style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 12pt; TEXT-ALIGN: justify" ="Msonormal"><FONT face="Times New Roman" color=#000000 size=3>SW:<SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes">  </SPAN>I really don't think it's relevant to talk about influences on the band at this stage in our career. <SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes"> </SPAN>For many years PT have striven to be Porcupine Tree, unlike anyone else. <SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes"> </SPAN>Also, inspiration comes from so many different sources - movies, books, life, experience....etc....and on top of this there are 4 very distinct personalities with the band. <SPAN style="mso-spacerun: yes"> </SPAN>At least 2 of the 4 members wouldn't listen to any of the groups you mention, and never did, and I think I can say that none of us ever listened to a Dream Theater record!



Oh jeeze... this is such a bogus answer that many artists put forth to depict their originality. I really dig PT, but they are not the most original band in the world. The Pink Floyd influences are pretty obvious, and you can easily sing the lyrics of "Comfortably Numb" to the music of "The Sky Moves Sideways (Phase I)".

 

But I guess this makes for a better answer than a littany of bands (which would obviously include Pink Floyd).

 

I think sometimes listing bands as influences can impress the reader -- if they are bands that sound nothing like the influenced band... If he said Ethel Merman was a huge influence, I would be perplexed, amazed, and confused...

 

But it sounds cool and postmodern to dodge the influence issue... It reminds me of a lot of indie rock bands with progressive leanings, who claim the same thing, but are really just rehashing Crimson riffs... and in that case, most of the audience thinks what they are doing is original, since they are 17 years old...


The Sky Moves Sideways was over a decade ago. Also, Steven said mentioning influences is not relevant in THIS stage of their career. Once again, the album you mentioned is over a decade old. Also, it isn't even really a Floyd influence, it was other bands of that era that inspired the songs on that album. Sure Floyd had something to do with it, but I'm sure you're disounting Ash Ra and Camel (maybe even a bit of Magma).

He's not copping out of anything. He's been very forthcoming with his influences (which you would notice in other posts on this very same forum).

Hope that clarifies things.
    

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Boom boom shake da mofo room


Posted By: ailgun
Date Posted: November 05 2006 at 04:15
Voyage 34's Phase 1 is pretty similar when we compare it with PF's Another BIW ph.1
First guitar riff is neary the same.
 
He might have ripped it off. Generaly every musician needs some times this kinda things I think. I am OK with it.


Posted By: pianoman
Date Posted: March 14 2007 at 19:02
He seems very open to questions and fan collaboration. Unlike Steve Howe.Ermm


Posted By: endlessepic
Date Posted: March 25 2007 at 13:01
Thanks, excellant interview.


Posted By: activetopics
Date Posted: September 17 2007 at 09:16
hooray!


Posted By: King Crimson776
Date Posted: November 22 2007 at 19:59
Porcupine Tree is a great band, but if Steven Wilson thinks they (or The Mars Volta and Sigur Ros for f**k's sake) are progressing music more than, for example, freaking Spock's Beard, he's a pretentious b*****d. It's all just a mix of influences at this point. When are we at the point where we can just do whatever and not have to constantly break boundaries, when are all the boundaries broken? He says progressing music isn't a big deal, but the bands he mentions are the ones who are worshiped because of their pretensions of being progressive.

Oh, and Donna Summers? That explains No-Man, I guess.


Posted By: Hamfari
Date Posted: November 24 2007 at 00:25
People have different opinions on progress, no need to call some1 a b*****d and believe you´re the only one who is King-knowitall    .... Spock´s beard? Nahh... bit too cheezy
Just dropping by this interview thread btw... seems kind of weird that this old interview seems to be in the top, always some1 reviving it.
 
 
p.s. PT fans , nice video interview w. SW http://www.delrock.it/videogallery/2007-11/intervista-a-steven-wilson-porcupine-tree.php - here  

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Nobody needs to go anywhere else. We are all, if we only knew it, already there.


Posted By: heyitsthatguy
Date Posted: November 24 2007 at 00:32
somehow I knew it was he who bumped this thread

did you find this by searching "The Mars Volta"? You must be dedicated, the 'search' function on this site's a real bitch LOL


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