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your opinion about blood sweat and tears

Printed From: Progarchives.com
Category: Other music related lounges
Forum Name: General Music Discussions
Forum Discription: Discuss and create polls about all types of music
URL: http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=29757
Printed Date: September 18 2014 at 16:55
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Topic: your opinion about blood sweat and tears
Posted By: markosherrera
Subject: your opinion about blood sweat and tears
Date Posted: October 12 2006 at 21:02
StarStarEmbarrassed  i make that question based in other of chicago ,i believe bst is the best in theirs style.



Replies:
Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 00:03
Love them; a true class act and one the first pop bands to adeptly use classical and jazz motifs. Great music.


Posted By: Dick Heath
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 05:48
We need a brass rock subsection in jazz fusion. Tower Of Power may have edged the jazz with rock bit - but I've only been educated in ToP in the last 3 years.


Posted By: Eetu Pellonpää
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 05:52

I love their self titled album! Are they on inclusion concideration?

Could "Mogul Thrash" fit as brass rock too?



Posted By: Peter
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 08:57
They're okay -- perhaps best enjoyed from the beer tent....Ermm

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Let the monkey drive.



Posted By: Dick Heath
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 10:21
Mogul Thrash do have that feel about them. I've mentioned before that I compiled myself a burn of the evolution of brass rock, which expanded to a second disc to take in brass rock/funk. What I (re)discovered is the genre has roots right back to jazz dance - e.g. Louis Jordan and before. It underwent considerable development in the soul and hard r'n'b scene during the 60's (e.g. James Brown, e.g. Musselshoals, BarKays with the Stax and Atlantic labels) and then BST came out with their mix of rock tunes in part jazzed up by mostly jazz musicians. However, Billy Cobham with the Breckers and John Abercrombie etc. had pulled together a brass rock type outfit in the late 60's called Dream - 2nd album appeared in 73, that band evolved into Billy Cobham's band for his 2nd to 4th solo album, and then the Brecker Brothers band appeared (I suggest influenced by the success of the Scot's Average White Band). Another early variant was Electric Flag who were more a blend of Chess brass with Atlantic Stax brass, behind modern electric blues.
 
I included  a track from Flock's first album on that burn, but with hindsight I am rather surprised to have found the woodwind/brass of Flock never seemed to take the lead during an instrumental - whilst all the most reputable brass rock bands made plenty of space. BTW Traffic seemed to have their tunes most commonly covered by brass rockers.
 
Main-stream jazzers jumpers on the bandwagon - e.g. Chase (named after leader Bill Chase) and in the UK the short lived Satisfaction - lead by trad jazzer Mike Cotton. Perhaps after BST and Chicago the UK band If was the most popular and its lead players had paid their dues in British 60's jazz groups. Brass rock can be still heard in a further developed form, e.g. Canadian band Glueleg, the occasional jazz rock of the Austrian band Extravaganza (their 1996 album Save The Robots, has polled as the best jazz rock of the 90's - sort of Steve Vai sound with jazz chords and a Tower of Power brass backing), and some of the early/middle period albums by Jamarequai always reminded me of sounding like Stevie Wonder with ToP or Chicago backing.


Posted By: Sean Trane
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 10:26
Originally posted by markosherrera

StarStarEmbarrassed  i make that question based in other of chicago ,i believe bst is the best in theirs style.
 
I much prefer Chicago until their 8th album. After that.................
 
In the brass rock genre, we have The Flock in the Archives.
 
If was the UK equivalent to Chicago and BST. Also a few mention for Electric Flag.


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Posted By: Dick Heath
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 13:30
Mogul Thrash do have that feel about them.
 
I've mentioned before that I compiled myself a burn of the evolution of brass rock, which expanded to a second disc to take in brass rock/funk. What I (re)discovered is the genre has roots right back to jazz dance - e.g. Louis Jordan and before. It underwent considerable development in the soul and hard r'n'b scene during the 60's (e.g. James Brown, e.g. Musselshoals, BarKays with the Stax and Atlantic labels) and then BST came out with their mix of rock tunes in part jazzed up by mostly jazz musicians. However, Billy Cobham with the Breckers and John Abercrombie etc. had pulled together a brass rock type outfit in the late 60's called Dream - 2nd album appeared in '73, that band evolved into Billy Cobham's Band for his 2nd to 4th solo album, and then the Brecker Brothers band appeared (I suggest influenced by the success of the Scot's Average White Band). Another early variant was Electric Flag who were more a blend of Chess brass with Atlantic Stax brass, behind modern electric blues.
 
I included  a track from Flock's first album on that burn, but with hindsight I am rather surprised to have found the woodwind/brass players of Flock never seemed to take the lead during an instrumental (at least on the evidence of the first album) - whilst all the most reputable brass rock bands made plenty of space. BTW Traffic seemed to have their tunes most commonly covered by brass rockers.
 
Main-stream jazzers jumped on the bandwagon - e.g. Chase (named after leader Bill Chase) and in the UK the short lived Satisfaction - lead by trad jazzer Mike Cotton. Perhaps after BST and Chicago, the UK band If was the most popular and its lead players had paid their dues in British 60's jazz groups. Brass rock can be still heard in a further developed form, e.g. Canadian band Glueleg, the occasional jazz rock of the Austrian band Extravaganza (their 1996 album Save The Robots, has polled as the best jazz rock of the 90's - sort of Steve Vai sound with jazz chords and a Tower of Power brass backing), and some of the early/middle period albums by Jamarequai always reminded me of sounding like Stevie Wonder with ToP or Chicago backing.
 
Mentioned it before but the DVD Chicago & Earth Wind & Fire Live At The Greek Theatre, is fun but not to be taken too seriously.
 
Finally useless fact No.1045367: David Clayton-Thomas the lead singer with BST (from BST album onwards), naturalised Canadian was born in the same town as Julie Andrews: Walton -On-Thames in England where Monty Python filmed the historical part of their famous  silly walks sketch.
 
 
(Apologies hit the wrong button).


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: October 13 2006 at 19:40
...for horns you must hear In Cahoots 'All That'. Just be careful the Rova Saxophone Quartet doesn't show up in a brass forum- experimental but not Progressive.



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