Print Page | Close Window

Robert Fripp - Please make him amazing for me

Printed From: Progarchives.com
Category: Progressive Music Lounges
Forum Name: Prog Bands, Artists and Genres Appreciation
Forum Discription: Discuss specific prog bands and their members or a specific sub-genre
URL: http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=58670
Printed Date: July 30 2014 at 17:16
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 9.69 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Robert Fripp - Please make him amazing for me
Posted By: rushfan4
Subject: Robert Fripp - Please make him amazing for me
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:08
I was drawn to King Crimson because of my love for Yes, and was interested because King Crimson was the band that Bill Bruford left Yes to join.  As I mentioned in at least one of my KC reviews, I viewed King Crimson as a Bill Bruford side project.  Because of this my focus when listening to KC has always been more on the drums and percussion than it has been on Robert Fripp's guitar playing.  And with the earlier albums it was sort of on Greg Lake's and Jon Anderson's vocals, as well as the drum and sax work of the earlier members of the earlier incarnations.  I've never really been wowwed by the guitar work.  I know that Mr. Fripp also played the mellotron and of course he is famous for Frippertronics.  At this point I am showing my naivete in saying that I would like to "hear" which KC songs are the ones that feature the most impressive guitar work from Mr. Fripp and I am kindly asking for your assistance.  Do I just not notice his genius because instead of the guitar he is more focused on the mellotron? Or is it because his guitar doesn't sound like a guitar because of the Frippertronics? 
 
I realize that Mr. Fripp is a big favorite amongst many prog fans and it is not my intention to disparage him here.  I am genuinely interested in more closely listening to some KC songs to hear this guitar playing that others find so amazing so that I can hear it for myself.  Thank you for your assistance in this adventure. 


-------------



Replies:
Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:12
Robert Fripp is not one of my favorite guitarists, but he is damned creative when it comes to what comes up with.  Part of that is due to his "New Standard Tuning" he began using in 1983, which makes cliche riffs and voicings all but useless.

I think Fripp's best work comes alongside Belew.  They compliment each other well.  Check out The Power to Believe if you have not already.  It is an excellent record (heavy prog, really).


-------------
http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:17
Originally posted by Epignosis

Robert Fripp is not one of my favorite guitarists, but he is damned creative when it comes to what comes up with.  Part of that is due to his "New Standard Tuning" he began using in 1983, which makes cliche riffs and voicings all but useless.

I think Fripp's best work comes alongside Belew.  They compliment each other well.  Check out The Power to Believe if you have not already.  It is an excellent record (heavy prog, really).

Hey, I was just listening to that one today.  Big smile


Posted By: The Quiet One
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:18
I'm in the same side as you Scott, never really got amazed by Fripp for his guitar playing, neither really concentrated(or maybe never "found" his guitar) on his guitar, with the exception of Sailor's Tale and some stuff from Red.

However, I haven't heard The Power to Believe that Robert has recomended..





-------------

http://www.last.fm/user/GordonComstock" rel="nofollow - "For me, music and life are all about style.” Miles Davis(last.fm)


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:25
If you want us to attempt to make Fripp amazing us Fripp fans have to know what you've heard and what you haven't in order to make any kind of case that will be meaningful in anyway at all.


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:29
Originally posted by The Quiet One

I'm in the same side as you Scott, never really got amazed by Fripp for his guitar playing, neither really concentrated(or maybe never "found" his guitar) on his guitar, with the exception of Sailor's Tale and some stuff from Red.

However, I haven't heard The Power to Believe that Robert has recomended..





How foolish of me.  The title track of Red is his best work.  Very creative.


-------------
http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: TGM: Orb
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:31
Originally posted by rushfan4

I realize that Mr. Fripp is a big favorite amongst many prog fans and it is not my intention to disparage him here.  I am genuinely interested in more closely listening to some KC songs to hear this guitar playing that others find so amazing so that I can hear it for myself.  Thank you for your assistance in this adventure. 


Yeah, the reason Fripp doesn't so much shock as a lead guitarist is that he is so focussed on playing for the song... he doesn't go out of the way to give you a blinding solo. Particularly neat, though,

Starting on the electrics:

1) the solo on Prince Rupert's Lament off Lizard, partly because the solo itself is very expressive, and partly because he introduces it so brilliantly by tagging himself onto the mellotron earlier.
2) Fracture... Starless and Bible Black features a lot of Fripp's best work, even if it is rather difficult to get into, and Fracture is particularly interesting... little melodic runs creeping in slowly to form a cohesive complete idea... very, very intense.
3) The Night Watch is the obvious place for a plain good guitar work piece. Despite the odd intro and outro, the guitar and vocals are among the best bits of all Crimson.
4) if you've got any live Crimson material, always worth a look... Fripp's a bit less specific with his guitars there, and is consequently a bit more prone to pulling off a great solo... live versions of Providence (well, the one with the full guitar mix), Cat Food and Easy Money (I mean, that riff kicks already, but live it becomes a monster) are great. Not to mention 80s live Crimson, which overshadows the studio records.
5) The opening of Moonchild... such a gorgeous tone.

And yeah, I sort of had the same thing for a while... I think the listen where Lizard clicked was probably the decider, though I did already like his work.


-------------


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:48
Originally posted by Slartibartfast

If you want us to attempt to make Fripp amazing us Fripp fans have to know what you've heard and what you haven't in order to make any kind of case that will be meaningful in anyway at all.
I have the entire Crimson studio discography.  I've just never walked away from listening to a Crimson album and said wow that was some great guitar playing.  I've said wow that was some great music, and excellent drumming and sax and mellotron playing but never guitar playing. Embarrassed  I don't have much of his solo work so maybe that is where I am missing out?

-------------


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:53
Originally posted by rushfan4

Originally posted by Slartibartfast

If you want us to attempt to make Fripp amazing us Fripp fans have to know what you've heard and what you haven't in order to make any kind of case that will be meaningful in anyway at all.
I have the entire Crimson studio discography.  I've just never walked away from listening to a Crimson album and said wow that was some great guitar playing.  I've said wow that was some great music, and excellent drumming and sax and mellotron playing but never guitar playing. Embarrassed  I don't have much of his solo work so maybe that is where I am missing out?


Then I think you've got the point.  I think the guitar in the supportive role is a most tasteful thing.


-------------
http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: The Quiet One
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 19:55
Originally posted by Epignosis

Originally posted by rushfan4

Originally posted by Slartibartfast

If you want us to attempt to make Fripp amazing us Fripp fans have to know what you've heard and what you haven't in order to make any kind of case that will be meaningful in anyway at all.
I have the entire Crimson studio discography.  I've just never walked away from listening to a Crimson album and said wow that was some great guitar playing.  I've said wow that was some great music, and excellent drumming and sax and mellotron playing but never guitar playing. Embarrassed  I don't have much of his solo work so maybe that is where I am missing out?


Then I think you've got the point.  I think the guitar in the supportive role is a most tasteful thing.


100% agree. Fripp seems more like a subtle guitarist, yet his few solo spots, are really tasteful, while not surprisingly amazing like a Howe or Gilmour solo to name well-known guys.


-------------

http://www.last.fm/user/GordonComstock" rel="nofollow - "For me, music and life are all about style.” Miles Davis(last.fm)


Posted By: Man With Hat
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:03
Perhaps my favorite Fripp solo is on the Neal And Jack And Me live DVD.
 
I believe the song is Larks Tongues Part III...Fripp  gives a really powerful solo and he gets quite into his playing (some might even classify it as rocking out). Its easy to be distracted by these antics (which are funny to me...and thus a plus) but the solo is a real winner.


-------------
Dig me...But don't...Bury me
I'm running still, I shall until, one day, I hope that I'll arrive
Warning: Listening to jazz excessively can cause a laxative effect.


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:11
to echo what other's have pointed to, Fripp was/is a composer much more than a soloist, a creator of big ideas more than small ones, and so it's his approach to music that impresses so much - musicians especially I suspect - with materials as Red, Larks' Tongues, Discipline and PtB.  The whole of the music is where he shines.







Posted By: Cygnus X-2
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:13
Fripp said Fracture is the hardest song he's ever played, and that'd be the one I'd say to listen to first.

-------------


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:14
Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

Fripp said Fracture is the hardest song he's ever played, and that'd be the one I'd say to listen to first.


agreed, especially in this case





Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:18
I love his work in the "Larks' Tongues in Aspic" tracks.

-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:52
Originally posted by rushfan4

Originally posted by Slartibartfast

If you want us to attempt to make Fripp amazing us Fripp fans have to know what you've heard and what you haven't in order to make any kind of case that will be meaningful in anyway at all.
I have the entire Crimson studio discography.  I've just never walked away from listening to a Crimson album and said wow that was some great guitar playing.  I've said wow that was some great music, and excellent drumming and sax and mellotron playing but never guitar playing. Embarrassed  I don't have much of his solo work so maybe that is where I am missing out?

Me too, I think, with regards to the KC studio discography.

Well, then if you aren't amazed by Fripp by now you may never be.  Really, amazing isn't really the adjective I'd apply anyway.  Even if you go to his truly solo stuff, I'd use the adjective subtle.  Fripp's strength for me is more in how well he works with in an ensemble context or even in a duo. 

Hey have you tried that live League Of Gentlemen album?  Really good stuff.  That might do it for you.  Big smile


Posted By: Cygnus X-2
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:56
If you want other Fripp stuff, here are a few songs he did as a session guitarist where he really tears it up.

Brian Eno- St. Elmo's Fire
Brian Eno- Babies on Fire
Peter Gabriel- Excuse Me
Talking Heads- I Zimbra
David Bowie- Teenage Wildlife
David Bowie- Scary Monsters


-------------


Posted By: Atavachron
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 20:57
and Summers/Fripp I Advance Masked  Thumbs Up





Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:23
Originally posted by Atavachron

and Summers/Fripp I Advance Masked  Thumbs Up





Horrible, horrible album.  It turned me into a fan of The Police. AngryLOL

Seriously, if it had not been for that album I would never have checked in to The Police.   Which, by the way, I find Summer's work on Synchronicity to be very heavily Frippian.  Frippertarian?  Frippnotistic?

Also if you don't have a low tolerance for popistic stuff, you might find his work on Darryl Hall's Sacred Songs interesting.  I didn't discover that one until early in this decade.

What I like about Fripp's style the most is his ability to be heaving hitting and to go atmospheric.


-------------


Posted By: mrcozdude
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:44
He's simply so diverse that you could not recommend some songs to summarise his playing.But my favourite is swastika Girls & Larks' Tounges in Aspic I & II.Very simply due to diversity and not knowing anyone who could of come up with something that great yet so perfect.

All hail Fripp!


-------------
http://www.last.fm/user/cozfunkel/" rel="nofollow">




Posted By: Valdez
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:52
I would say that the most interesting guitar work that RF has ever done resides in the song "Starless" on RED.  Starting at 4:29...
 
And i am not kidding either... it's the most effective (albeit economical) guitar solo I have ever heard.   
 


-------------
http://bakullama.com


Posted By: WalterDigsTunes
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:53
Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

If you want other Fripp stuff, here are a few songs he did as a session guitarist where he really tears it up.

Brian Eno- St. Elmo's Fire
Brian Eno- Babies on Fire
Peter Gabriel- Excuse Me
Talking Heads- I Zimbra
David Bowie- Teenage Wildlife
David Bowie- Scary Monsters


If these don't do it for you, I don't know what will.


-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 21:55
Now, you are getting verrry sleepy and when you awake, you will find Fripp not only amazing, but AMAZINGLY AMAZING!!!!


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 22:12
Probably the reason for The ConstruKction of Light having both FraKctured and Larks Tongue in Aspic IV.  There is actually some decent guitar playing on this album, but it is not a very enjoyable album to listen to in my opinion.  You can definitely pick up on some of the repeated themes within these songs.

-------------


Posted By: jammun
Date Posted: June 10 2009 at 22:25
Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 


-------------
Can you tell me where we're headin'?
Lincoln County Road or Armageddon.


Posted By: harmonium.ro
Date Posted: June 11 2009 at 07:15
I absolutely love Fripp's playing, even though I can't name any spectacular moments (maybe except some in "Red" the album). I'm just starting to explore his solo discography. "The Repercussions of Angelic Behaviour" shows some impressive playing, but it's not easy-listening at all... It might not suit your taste.


../album.asp?id=8140">
3.83 | 4 ratings
../album.asp?id=8140 - The Repercussions of Angelic Behavior (with Trey Gunn and Bill Rieflin)
1999



-------------


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: June 11 2009 at 07:33
Originally posted by jammun

Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 

I totally agree with the acoustic guitar in "Circus". If you don''t go "wow" over that one you have no idea of guitar playing.
Also have a look at this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4V9pQsOc30 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4V9pQsOc30
If this still does not convince you, you can't be helped.




-------------

BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: Raff
Date Posted: June 11 2009 at 07:35
I'll go against the grain here, and tell you that it is not mandatory to find Fripp (or anyone else) amazing. From what you know about your tastes, Scott, you are into a more 'traditional' guitar style, as in classic rock (something that I share with you, so it is not surprising that Fripp's style may leave you somewhat cold.

Personally speaking, I appreciate him more as an all-round musician (composer, innovator, etc.) than as a mere guitarist. He may be the only constant in the endless variations of the KC lineup, but the band sure would have never been the icon of progressive rock they are without the contribution of the other musicians - Lake, Wetton, McDonald, Bruford, and all the rest.

-------------


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: June 11 2009 at 08:38
Originally posted by Raff

I'll go against the grain here, and tell you that it is not mandatory to find Fripp (or anyone else) amazing. From what you know about your tastes, Scott, you are into a more 'traditional' guitar style, as in classic rock (something that I share with you, so it is not surprising that Fripp's style may leave you somewhat cold.

Personally speaking, I appreciate him more as an all-round musician (composer, innovator, etc.) than as a mere guitarist. He may be the only constant in the endless variations of the KC lineup, but the band sure would have never been the icon of progressive rock they are without the contribution of the other musicians - Lake, Wetton, McDonald, Bruford, and all the rest.

I believe it is quite possible to recognize instrumental mastership without having to like what is being played; I see absolutely no contradiction there.
Example: I dislike double bass drumming and would NEVER resort to it myself (I am a drummer); nevertheless I won't deny the skills of drummers that use it.


-------------

BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: June 11 2009 at 09:00
Its infact hard to think of him as trying to do the more Basic stuff, or rather where does he move down to the level of a Rock lead guitar player,
His talent is not trying to compete with steve Vai, thanks god for that.
But try Heroes, by bowie, the hole record is full of playfull fripp Leadguitar.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


-------------
My Music: www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com
My blog: www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com" rel="nofollow - www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com


Posted By: Vibrationbaby
Date Posted: June 11 2009 at 09:24
I like Bob`s mirthful Saxon wit. 

-------------
                


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: June 11 2009 at 12:53
Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

If you want other Fripp stuff, here are a few songs he did as a session guitarist where he really tears it up.

Brian Eno- Babies on Fire
 
Just get the album "Here Come the warm Jets" ... Robert is all over that album and folks like eno trust him enough to let him do his thing and there are some fine things in there ... and the best one is the bombastic one ... fabulous.
 
I also like his involvement in a couple of other places. In Peter Hammill's album H to He, he also does some really nice things ...
 
A lot of people prefer KC for many reasons, but sadly the discussions of his music and processes are rarely taken on, and some folks would rather consider this "prog" than actually look at what he does ... and he does it well -- and it has a lot to do with something else ... that is "progressive" and widely used in many arts ... but rarely seen in music, specially when too much of it is centered around a concept (like "jazz", "rock" and other styles) that precludes anyone's ability to be creative, original and special in their own way.
 
The sad result of treating it this way is that it brings down the value of the music in the context of the musical history itself, and the appreciation for Robert Fripp's magnanimous work in helping develop the guitar playing into something much more tangible than ... a rock guitar playing rock'n'roll ... and not even the "prog" boards and reviewers credit him on that account.
 
Taking an instrument and "expanding" it, is what Robert is about ... the musical context is less important per se ... and this is widely seen in so many King Crimson albums ... there is an incredible difference between a lot of things in there and styles and experiments over the years. And this is the legacy that the band is not receiving when it is being cornered into being a "prog" band, which even Robert Fripp does not accept and denies.
 
In theater, there are some exercises that are used in acting to help season the actor some ... and improve the quality of the eventual performance. And some of these things could be simple, weird, and crazy, but in the end, it adds to the result some surprising details. Let's say that a scene is stuck and sounds boring. And you are trying to figure out how to make it better. Saying the words differently is not helping. Having you face the wall is not helping. Having the stage colored in blue is not helping ... what do you do?
 
In acting terms, you do not throw the wrench in, but you throw a left curve in the middle of things ... and this often has unexpected results and the acting training is important ... for it to work ... so all of a sudden you have a pause ... and when you re-enter the scene/play/music, it sounds ... slightly different ... because you changed it's procedure. If you apply this to King Crimson, it becomes clear that there are moments when something similar to this happens ... and instead of a chord change you have a song change ... a completely different something that brings a different personna to the table.
 
Now apply this to the 1st album by King Crimson ... and you find that ... there are a couple of open ended pieces (Moonchild for example) ... and then it breaks into a massive anthem ... Epitath ... taken from a poem written by a friend, and a vociferous attack on the warmongering mentality around the world, from Ireland -- not too far away from London and the shameless bombings with or without reason, to VietNam the TV war, to the Cold War also a few miles out from London ... in a town where the arts are its biggest attraction ... no one goes to London for anything else (well ... victorian england writers might say it differently!) ... and a lot of these people sit and drink together ... and ohhh by the way ... his wife was an actress and singer -- like he wouldn't know some of this stuff?
 
It should be said, that King Crimson helped validate the rock music medium a lot more with its expressive and poetic tuning, than anything else ... since at the time, a lot of rock music was still tied to popular music and radio specially ... and its ability to show itself as more intelligent, more classical and more in tune with a higher knowledgable sense and part of ourselves, was its greatest gift to you and I.
 
And a tribute to a giant in that area ... not the only one, mind you ... but a Giant ... and he knows it ... but he is also intelligent enough to know that the media world of stars is fickle (witness fans here demanding that their favorite bands kiss their behinds and not do what they see fit for their art!) and often times brutal, and more often than not folks like Robert Fripp can not deal with that well, and will closet himself and stay focused on the music, instead of what could come across as anger on his part ...
 
You can also tell that he is more "classically minded" with his instrument, when he is playing it sitting down, and trying to get more out of the instrument than otherwise many of us are capable of imagining ... and I think this is important ... some people think that this takes the emotional side of rock music out ... and that is a sin, since we can not imagine that music without it ... but what we are not seeing is ... here is a modern day Paganini ... and I'm not sure that you could EVER ask for more.
 
If you read this far ... I applaud you ... and commend you for being so kind ... the music itself and the artists are much greater than any words I could possibly ever come up with ...


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 08:34
Originally posted by Valdez

I would say that the most interesting guitar work that RF has ever done resides in the song "Starless" on RED.  Starting at 4:29...
 
And i am not kidding either... it's the most effective (albeit economical) guitar solo I have ever heard.   
 


This is my favourite too, and not just at 4.29, as subtle and great as that passage is, it's also the tasteful introduction as well. The title track, Red, is also a colossus of prog.

He is such a clever and eclectric musician that it is somewhat difficult to pick out blinding solos, as King Crimson, in whatever lineup, were always about the whole, and not the individual. Depending on my mood, I enjoy Belew as much as Wetton, Lake, Anderson et al.


-------------


In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: Evolver
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 09:20
Originally posted by jammun

Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 
I must agree with this, as well.  LTIA part one, after the second wave of power chords, Fripp's playing always amazes me here.
 
Cirkus, also.


-------------
Trust me. I know what I'm doing.


Posted By: Jim Garten
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 09:56
I've always seen KC as Fripp's way of getting stunning collections of diverse musicians together in one place; I mean look at the people who've moved through KC over the last 40 years - it reads like a prog rock who's who (I guess the American equivalent would have been the Frank Zappa Finishing School ).

So many albums have been listed here from KC & outside interests, but another I'd like to stick in the mix would be his work with David Sylvian - these two in particular:



Gone To Earth (Fripp and Bill Nelson on the same album )



The First Day

Grumpy old bugger he may be, but Fripp has never stood still - in this respect, he could possibly be cited as one of the ultimate & true progressive rock guitarists.

Just my opinion, you understand.

-------------

Jon Lord 1941 - 2012


Posted By: A B Negative
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 10:45
Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

If you want other Fripp stuff, here are a few songs he did as a session guitarist where he really tears it up.

Brian Eno- St. Elmo's Fire
Brian Eno- Babies on Fire
Peter Gabriel- Excuse Me
Talking Heads- I Zimbra
David Bowie- Teenage Wildlife
David Bowie- Scary Monsters
 
I'd add Blondie - Fade Away and Radiate.
 


-------------
"The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar.... Now, that's my idea of a good time."


Posted By: harmonium.ro
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 18:52
Fripp has played on a Blondie album? Shocked

-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 19:21
Originally posted by harmonium.ro

Fripp has played on a Blondie album? Shocked

I had heard that and then read somewhere he was only considering working with them, but I see two songs named, so I'll buy it.

As I mentioned earlier, he has also played on a Darryl Hall album. ShockedLOL


Posted By: prog4evr
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 20:07
From the same album as "Neal and Jack and Me," the last song "Requiem" on KC 'Beat' (1982) is some of the best Fripp guitar work I have ever heard.  Belew complements well also on that song, as does Bruford's exceptional jazzy drumming...

-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 22:46
How about some Fripp with the Roches?
Prog Folk perhaps?
  1. we
  2. hammond song
  3. mr. sellack
  4. damned old dog
  5. the troubles
  6. the train
  7. the married men
  8. runs in the family
  9. quitting time
  10. pretty and high


Liner Notes:

WE
Words & Music by Maggie, Terre & Suzzy Roche

HAMMOND SONG
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

MR. SELLACK
Words & Music by Terre Roche

DAMNED OLD DOG
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

THE TROUBLES
Words & Music by Maggie, Terre & Suzzy Roche

THE TRAIN
Words & Music by Suzzy Roche

THE MARRIED MEN
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

RUNS IN THE FAMILY
Words & Music by Terre Roche

QUITING TIME
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche

PRETTY AND HIGH
Words & Music by Margaret A. Roche



PRODUCED IN AUDIO VERITE BY ROBERT FRIPP
Engineer: Ed Sprigg
Assitant Engineer: Jon Smith
Recorded at the Hit Factory in New York during September, October & November 1978

MUSICIANS:
Suzzy Roche - Vocals, Guitar
Maggie Roche - Vocals, Guitar, Synthesizer (on "Quitting Time")
Terre Roche - Vocals, Guitar
Robert Fripp - Electric Guitar, Fripperies
Tony Levin - Bass
Jim Maelen - Triangle, Shaker
Larry Fast - Synthesizer Programmer
Special thanks to everyone who came to the shows
Art Direction: Peter Whorf
Design Brad Kanawyer
Photography: Gary Heery

NOTES

With one of the most distinctive and diverse vocal sounds in the modern musical spectrum, the Roche sisters -- Maggie, Suzzy and Terre -- weave barbershop harmonies, traditional Irish melodies, doo-wop, bee bop and a dozen other styles into a sound wholly their own on their acclaimed 1979 release, The Roches. Featuring ten original songs written by the trio singly or in various combinations, The Roches spotlights the wry humor, subtle arrangements and consummate musical craftsmanship that has brought the group both critical and popular acclaim.

Maggie and Terre Roche first began singing together professionally in the late '60s, when both left school to pursue a musical career. In 1970, they were recruited by Paul Simon to sing backup on his best-selling LP There Goes Rhymin' Simon. Shortly thereafter, the duo released their own LP, Seductive Reasoning (1975). After relocating briefly to Louisiana, the pair appeared as a duo for the last time at the Women's Music Festival in the summer of 1976.

Suzzy Roche, who had been attending college in upstate New York, joined her sisters that same year. Now a trio, The Roches immediately earned a loyal following on the Greenwhich Village club scene, where their wide ranging musical tastes and penchant for lyric wordplay garnered critical raves. Signed to Warner Bros. Records in late 1978, they began work immediately on their debut album with renowned producer and conceptualist Robert Fripp.

The result is The Roches, produced in "Audio Verite" and featuring such standout cuts as the introductory "We," "The Married Men" (subsequently covered by Phoebe Snow), the moody "Hammond Song" and "Pretty And High."



He's amazingly amazing in his being all over the place. Big smile

It's really weird.  Every place I run into Fripp in the prog music web I've run into something musically that I haven't experienced before...


-------------


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 23:09
I just felt like sharing this:

[TUBE]LTTHQgmpQII[/TUBE]




-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 12 2009 at 23:34
I'd never seen that, thanks for sharing.  I had totally dismissed the Police until I heard I Advanced Masked.  Appreciating Sting, after that, then recognizing Stewart Copeland had played with Curved Air.  I like to call it the prog rock web.   I don't know if someone's launched a thread on that yet...

There's been a big interconnectedness in artists and it's spanning the two prog generations so far.


Posted By: American Khatru
Date Posted: June 13 2009 at 07:21
I haven't taken the time to read all the replies, sorry to say, so please excuse me if I repeat things already said. 

Robert Fripp is different, so far as I know, from all rock electric guitarists in his complete discipline (bear with me, I know there are people who don't consider that meritorious).  If I'm not mistaken, he is a proper very-British man of staid emotions and cool detachment (who, within the one context of the Les Paul, will suddenly rip your head off!).  Look at a picture of him playing, the myspace page for instance; most times you'll see a man calmly sitting on a stool, posture and technique perfect.  Most rock guitarists are far more about physically emoting while playing (not a knock, just a fact).  I saw KC in NYC at the Pier that summer when they supported ToaPP.  It's been a long time, but I'll try: he came out with a smile and a gentle wave to the cheering fans, sat erect with his guitar in that stool, and played a solo that floored everyone; I think a lot of it has to do with the wide difference between apparent manner (him sitting there, almost classical) and the intensity and honesty of the expression hitting the ear.  The members came out and (again, if I remember correctly) they broke into Larks' II.  Holy smokes it was great!

KC has to be understood I think within the crucible of classical musician and composer practices.  Look at the use of materials on the first side of Red, most especially the title track.  Fracture is a rondo (and if you're looking for a song to "make him amazing", you'd do worse than to start with Starless and Bible Black).

If someone decided to do a Mahler-orchestra-sized transcription of those middle-period KC masterpieces it would be easier than doing the same for all other prog bands, even those termed 'symphonic', because it's already there



Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: June 13 2009 at 08:28
Originally posted by Slartibartfast

I'd never seen that, thanks for sharing.  I had totally dismissed the Police until I heard I Advanced Masked.  Appreciating Sting, after that, then recognizing Stewart Copeland had played with Curved Air.  I like to call it the prog rock web.   I don't know if someone's launched a thread on that yet...

There's been a big interconnectedness in artists and it's spanning the two prog generations so far.

Actually the Police are a Gong spin-off; they were originally called Strontium 90 and had an additional member, Mike Howlett of Gong on bass guitar; Sting played rhythm guitar at first. They played on the Gong festival which took place on May 23rd 1977. "Gong Est  Mort - Vive Gong" was recorded at that festival.


-------------

BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: June 13 2009 at 08:45
Originally posted by BaldFriede

Originally posted by jammun

Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 

I totally agree with the acoustic guitar in "Circus". If you don''t go "wow" over that one you have no idea of guitar playing.
Also have a look at this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4V9pQsOc30 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4V9pQsOc30
If this still does not convince you, you can't be helped.



You see what I mean? This is passive/ aggresive. If someone doesn't share your view...well then.....they know nothing!

Wink


-------------
Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 13 2009 at 10:47
Originally posted by BaldFriede

Originally posted by Slartibartfast

I'd never seen that, thanks for sharing.  I had totally dismissed the Police until I heard I Advanced Masked.  Appreciating Sting, after that, then recognizing Stewart Copeland had played with Curved Air.  I like to call it the prog rock web.   I don't know if someone's launched a thread on that yet...

There's been a big interconnectedness in artists and it's spanning the two prog generations so far.

Actually the Police are a Gong spin-off; they were originally called Strontium 90 and had an additional member, Mike Howlett of Gong on bass guitar; Sting played rhythm guitar at first. They played on the Gong festival which took place on May 23rd 1977. "Gong Est  Mort - Vive Gong" was recorded at that festival.

I did not know that.  Pretty cool.


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 09:55
Originally posted by Slartibartfast

...  after that, then recognizing Stewart Copeland had played with Curved Air.  I like to call it the prog rock web.   I don't know if someone's launched a thread on that yet...
 
The Copeland in Curved Air was Miles, not Stewart ... and I've been told that is his brother ... also, was it not Stewart that was married to Sonja Kristina? ... or something like that?
 
...
 
Actually the Police are a Gong spin-off; they were originally called Strontium 90 and had an additional member, Mike Howlett of Gong on bass guitar; Sting played rhythm guitar at first. They played on the Gong festival which took place on May 23rd 1977. "Gong Est  Mort - Vive Gong" was recorded at that festival.
 
I doubt this very much ... Gong was there way before the Police ever came around, and while it is possible that Sting munched around and might have played, I doubt it ... during that time in the early 70's prior to the Police, both Andy Summers and Sting were involved with Eberhard Schoenner in Germany and I am inclined to believe that is where they met. While a couple of songs Sting sings in there are not great, they do show an ability to create words on the fly and adjust well, and that, I'm sure, is what got Andy and him together to make a band ...


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 10:07
Originally posted by moshkito

The Copeland in Curved Air was Miles, not Stewart ... and I've been told that is his brother ... also, was it not Stewart that was married to Sonja Kristina? ... or something like that?

I often goof when working off the top of my head but it was Stewart that drummed with Curved Air.  I remember Miles for being a total jerk as manager with regard to the compensation for the musicians who were working with Stin-g on his first solo album in the film about it.

While were at it, let's confuse Aaron into the mix...


Posted By: A B Negative
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 13:23
Originally posted by harmonium.ro

Fripp has played on a Blondie album? Shocked
 
Parallel Lines Wink


-------------
"The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar.... Now, that's my idea of a good time."


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 13:30
This ain't called the archives for nothing.  Pretty much any question can be answered and you never know what you might learn.


Posted By: Captain Capricorn
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 13:40
The most impressive thing, for me, about Fripp's playing is his uncanny ablilty to produce sonic fluid arpeggos at will ...if Fripp was a superhero, that'd be his super power Wink Tongue

-------------


Posted By: Logan
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 13:41
[TUBE]weyBdXDg0Ro[/TUBE]

Awesome, I like Blondie.




-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 17:46
Had a lotta beans
and I got some gas
made a big fart
blew it out my ass LOL


-------------


Posted By: Captain Capricorn
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 17:50
Originally posted by Slartibartfast

I had totally dismissed the Police until I heard I Advanced Masked.
 
Behind My Camel wasn't too shabby either Approve


-------------


Posted By: WalterDigsTunes
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 17:51
Originally posted by moshkito

...
 
Actually the Police are a Gong spin-off; they were originally called Strontium 90 and had an additional member, Mike Howlett of Gong on bass guitar; Sting played rhythm guitar at first. They played on the Gong festival which took place on May 23rd 1977. "Gong Est  Mort - Vive Gong" was recorded at that festival.
 
I doubt this very much ... Gong was there way before the Police ever came around, and while it is possible that Sting munched around and might have played, I doubt it ... during that time in the early 70's prior to the Police, both Andy Summers and Sting were involved with Eberhard Schoenner in Germany and I am inclined to believe that is where they met. While a couple of songs Sting sings in there are not great, they do show an ability to create words on the fly and adjust well, and that, I'm sure, is what got Andy and him together to make a band ...


Well, of course Gong came first: You can't  say The Police are a Gong spin-off if Gong wasn't around already Tongue


-------------


Posted By: BaldFriede
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 18:03
Originally posted by moshkito

Originally posted by Slartibartfast

...  after that, then recognizing Stewart Copeland had played with Curved Air.  I like to call it the prog rock web.   I don't know if someone's launched a thread on that yet...
 
The Copeland in Curved Air was Miles, not Stewart ... and I've been told that is his brother ... also, was it not Stewart that was married to Sonja Kristina? ... or something like that?
 
...
 
Actually the Police are a Gong spin-off; they were originally called Strontium 90 and had an additional member, Mike Howlett of Gong on bass guitar; Sting played rhythm guitar at first. They played on the Gong festival which took place on May 23rd 1977. "Gong Est  Mort - Vive Gong" was recorded at that festival.
 
I doubt this very much ... Gong was there way before the Police ever came around, and while it is possible that Sting munched around and might have played, I doubt it ... during that time in the early 70's prior to the Police, both Andy Summers and Sting were involved with Eberhard Schoenner in Germany and I am inclined to believe that is where they met. While a couple of songs Sting sings in there are not great, they do show an ability to create words on the fly and adjust well, and that, I'm sure, is what got Andy and him together to make a band ...

Sting's involvement with Eberhard Schoener was in the late 70s, not the early 70s, at the time that "Video Magic" came out. Which fits pretty well with what I have said. The Gong festival I speak of took place on May 23rd 1977; there was an article about it in the the German "Musik Magazin"; they mentioned Strontium 90 as one of the opening acts of that festival and gave the complete line-up, which is the one I mentioned. My brother collected Musik Magazin at that time, and I remember reading that article.
Also have a look at this Wikipedia entry:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_police#Formation - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_police#Formation
And no, this entry was not written by me.




-------------

BaldJean and I; I am the one in blue.


Posted By: Bitterblogger
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 18:28
Originally posted by Slartibartfast

Originally posted by harmonium.ro

Fripp has played on a Blondie album? Shocked

I had heard that and then read somewhere he was only considering working with them, but I see two songs named, so I'll buy it.

As I mentioned earlier, he has also played on a Darryl Hall album. ShockedLOL
 
I can go one better--he played on a Hall & Oates album (Along The Red Ledge). Confused


Posted By: hitting_singularity2
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 18:38
Originally posted by Atavachron

Originally posted by Cygnus X-2

Fripp said Fracture is the hardest song he's ever played, and that'd be the one I'd say to listen to first.


agreed, especially in this case


 
I read this then went and listened to Starless and Bible Black.. which I have not heard before.  I must say, Fracture was imidiately one of my favorite KC songs I have heard.. I just find that guitar part so addictive, even tho its pretty repetative.  I enjoyed the entire album immesly as well, which i can say to some but not all KC albums (especially not most of the early ones)


-------------


Posted By: ProgressiveAttic
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 23:28
*21rst Century Schizoid Man
*Red
*Tremelo study In A Major (Giles Giles & Fripp-->amaizing solo on spanish guitar, it shows why fripp is the master of speed)
*Lark's...(1,2 and 3)
*Frame by Frame
*Level Five
*FraKctured
*Into the Frying Pan
*Thrack
*Vroom
*Elektrik

-------------
Michael's Sonic Kaleidoscope Mondays 5:00pm EST(re-runs Thursdays 3:00pm) @ Delicious Agony Progressive Rock Radio(http://www.deliciousagony.com)


Posted By: ProgressiveAttic
Date Posted: June 15 2009 at 23:39
Do you have The Power To Believe or The CostruKction Of Light?...no mellotrons, no sax...almost no distraction from the guitar

-------------
Michael's Sonic Kaleidoscope Mondays 5:00pm EST(re-runs Thursdays 3:00pm) @ Delicious Agony Progressive Rock Radio(http://www.deliciousagony.com)


Posted By: Tengent
Date Posted: June 17 2009 at 12:22
I am surprised nobody has mentioned what he did on Evening Star. The second track of the same name has the most beautiful guitar solo I have ever heard (and tone imo).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5J_FvEqY--0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzfVYB4UsQ4&feature=channel_page (me attempting to play like Fripp Tongue)


Posted By: Progosopher
Date Posted: June 17 2009 at 14:59
As others have said, there are many layers to Fripp's playing.  He can work within the context of the song exclusively, be subtle, full of delicacy and nuance, or he can be so blatant his playing is like stabbing hot pokers into your eardrums.  He is very precise, even when playing fast, and brother, he is fast.  Where it gets difficult for me to appreciate him is in the very early Crimson work where so many of his solos were atonal with really harsh tones.  I even got to the point where I wondered if he even understood what a key was.  His song construction is fabulous, and he makes really weird chords and changes that somehow work.  Any version of Larks' Toungues shows him off well.  Some of his best work came from the 80s version of Crimson IMO, and that's where he concentrated more on serving the song rather than wailing.

-------------
The world of sound is certainly capable of infinite variety and, were our sense developed, of infinite extensions. -- George Santayana, "The Sense of Beauty"


Posted By: Anderson III
Date Posted: June 18 2009 at 09:31
Originally posted by jammun

Two great KC songs where we get to hear Fripp at his best:
 
Cirkus, from Lizard.  The acoustic guitar work on this song...the manner in which it provides texture to the song proper...is amazingly amazingly amazing
 
Then check out the guitar solo on LITA Part One, which solo to this day makes no sense to me but is still one of my favorite guitar solos by any guitarist.  It addles my already-addled brain. 


ClapClapClap
Clap

-------------
"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and cannot remain silent" - Victor Hugo


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: June 18 2009 at 09:55
Originally posted by Progosopher

Any version of Larks' Toungues shows him off well.  Some of his best work came from the 80s version of Crimson IMO, and that's where he concentrated more on serving the song rather than wailing.
 
Thank you everybody for your contributions to this thread.  I will give a re-listen to some of the songs that have been mentioned. I am in agreement that Larks' Tongue in Aspic is an excellent musical piece, and is quite possibly my favorite piece from King Crimson.  But what I love about that song is the percussion and drum work.  I will have to give it a re-listen for the guitar work. 
 
What I find interesting are the couple of comments similar to what I have quoted.  In case any one is interested, prior to starting this thread, I have actually reviewed all of the King Crimson albums from their debut to Starless and Bible Black.  Not some of my better reviews, but they were an exercise to get me to re-listen to King Crimson and see what makes them so popular here at PA.  It was during these re-listens and reviews that I began wondering about what made Robert Fripp so popular as a guitarist, as to my ears, there wasn't all that much that stood out in the guitar category.  Translated: no Eddie Van Halen or Yngwie Malmsteen moments.  It is interesting the number of comments regarding his composition skills as opposed to his "shredding" skills, and like with comments regarding Steve Hackett's contributions to Genesis, how his guitar work is meant to be a part of the music versus being something that stands out above and beyond the music.  I am one that does enjoy King Crimson's 80's output, again mostly because of Bill Bruford's involvement and contributions.  I will hopefully get around to finishing my review tour of the King Crimson catalogue and I will give special care to listen for Robert Fripp's guitar contributions to these albums.
 
Cheers and thank you again to everyone for your assistance with this matter.
 
Scott


-------------


Posted By: American Khatru
Date Posted: June 18 2009 at 10:13
Originally posted by rushfan4

... It was during these re-listens and reviews that I began wondering about what made Robert Fripp so popular as a guitarist, as to my ears, there wasn't all that much that stood out in the guitar category...
 
You might be interested to know:  Last night I watched, on YouTube, a 3-part interview that BBC2 did with him back in 1985 (search "robert fripp wimborne" and you'll find them; it's a half-hour total).  It's a great piece for a number of reasons, but your wrap-up caused me to remember something that might explain Fripp's not being so front-and-center in his band (as opposed to, say, Eddie in Van Halen or whatever).  At one point he talks about how playing with Bowie was great because Bowie gave him "freedom" as a guitarist.  He goes on to explain that, with Crimson, his role tended to be more "organizational" and that his guitar work was really secondary.  This is how he saw the band and how he best felt it would succeed (and it did).  Again, the Fripp is a different animal than most.  Anyway check out the interview.
 


Posted By: Stooge
Date Posted: June 20 2009 at 15:07
Nobody can appreciate Robert Fripp more than this guy does:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCAQAlw6cAU&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCAQAlw6cAU&feature=related

http:///www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2iTo63Fl48 - http:///www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2iTo63Fl48





Posted By: Dominic
Date Posted: June 20 2009 at 15:10
Originally posted by Progosopher

As others have said, there are many layers to Fripp's playing.  He can work within the context of the song exclusively, be subtle, full of delicacy and nuance, or he can be so blatant his playing is like stabbing hot pokers into your eardrums.  He is very precise, even when playing fast, and brother, he is fast.  Where it gets difficult for me to appreciate him is in the very early Crimson work where so many of his solos were atonal with really harsh tones.  I even got to the point where I wondered if he even understood what a key was.  His song construction is fabulous, and he makes really weird chords and changes that somehow work.  Any version of Larks' Toungues shows him off well.  Some of his best work came from the 80s version of Crimson IMO, and that's where he concentrated more on serving the song rather than wailing.


These are pretty much my feelings exactly. Clap


-------------


Posted By: Drummerboy
Date Posted: June 29 2009 at 09:22
Originally posted by Epignosis

Robert Fripp is not one of my favorite guitarists, but he is damned creative when it comes to what comes up with.  Part of that is due to his "New Standard Tuning" he began using in 1983, which makes cliche riffs and voicings all but useless.

I think Fripp's best work comes alongside Belew.  They compliment each other well.  Check out The Power to Believe if you have not already.  It is an excellent record (heavy prog, really).


Posted By: Drummerboy
Date Posted: June 29 2009 at 09:24
Sorry, I have to say when Belew joined forces Fripp really lost me, although I tried several times over a period of years to get back to what was one of the original greats: listen to Lark's Tongue or Red.


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: July 01 2009 at 13:44
As a strange aside to this thread, I do have 4 albums from the California Guitar Trio and I think that these guys are phenomenal guitarists.  If my reading ability and memory serve me right, they all learned their trade under Mr. Fripp. 

-------------


Posted By: Lodij van der Graaf
Date Posted: July 21 2009 at 06:38
Robert Fripp is highly-acclaimed for his creativity and innovation. About his playing-style, he is one of the most uniquest guitarist ever.

His contributions on two VDGG albums are also a highlight.


Posted By: JLocke
Date Posted: July 21 2009 at 15:05
Here's the thing: I wholeheartedly believe that Fripp could easily out-play many of the 'shredders' out there if he wanted to. He has proved his capability and skill on the Guitar many times. However, he chooses not to go in that direction much because he is more concerned with whether or not his instrument compliments the music itself or not. Most of the time Guitar solos are there simply to impress the ear and not enhance the song.

I think Fripp's impressiveness comes from what Robert mentioned earlier; his incredibly fresh take on the instrument itself. Wink It's how he approaches Guitar playing that is so amazing, not soecifically how fast or technically he plays, if that makes any sense . . .


-------------


Posted By: harmonium.ro
Date Posted: July 23 2009 at 10:48
BTW this goes for all those who say Fripp is grumpy and has no humour.

Check out his blog for July 13 here http://www.dgmlive.com/diaries.htm?entry=15134 - http://www.dgmlive.com/diaries.htm?entry=15134 and see his photo-collage with the adventures of Willifred, his rabbit LOL


-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: July 23 2009 at 11:42
Originally posted by harmonium.ro

BTW this goes for all those who say Fripp is grumpy and has no humour.

Check out his blog for July 13 here http://www.dgmlive.com/diaries.htm?entry=15134 - http://www.dgmlive.com/diaries.htm?entry=15134 and see his photo-collage with the adventures of Willifred, his rabbit LOL

The Cheerful Insanity Of Giles Giles and Fripp also makes the case. Big smile
It couldn't possibly be gust the Gileses that were cheerfully insane.


-------------


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: July 24 2009 at 08:19
Sadly the original League of gentlemen is very hard to get,for those that havent got it allready., but its again proves his great sence of humour, musicaly and otherwise.
 
I think if you go trough his hole production without finding a great sence of humour, something must be wrong with your sence of houmour.
 
The David Byrne vocals on Under Heavy Manners,  For Fripp Sake -  its fun. 


-------------
My Music: www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com
My blog: www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com" rel="nofollow - www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com


Posted By: Triceratopsoil
Date Posted: May 09 2010 at 22:51
Listen all the way through the song Fracture with the volume loud enough to pick up the quiet guitar in the middle

then listen to Starless

then listen to the guitar solo work on The Night Watch

then listen to his noodly guitar bits on Brian Eno's album Another Green World, especially the song Saint Elmo's Fire

then pick up the minimalist space jam album The Equatorial Stars by Fripp and Eno

That might be a good start

PS Rushfan4 told me to necropost here


-------------
http://www.last.fm/user/TullDerGraff" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: Peter
Date Posted: May 09 2010 at 23:09
Fripp's smokin' solo on Bowie's "Scary Monsters" is very cool, and supposedly one of Fripp's own faves. Cool

-------------
Let the monkey drive.



Posted By: TODDLER
Date Posted: May 10 2010 at 00:06
As Greg Lake once said...Fripp is an underrated guitarist. He explained that what Fripp did on guitar with Crimson was not a full representation of his vast knowledge on the strings. There is this Paganini piece  he plays which displays him as a superior guitarist. You wouldn't be able to spot that upon hearing the beautiful, simple, and melodic chord changes that guide us through "Cadence and Cascade". "Pictures Of A City" has some very errie and rapid harmony overdubs on electric guitar. I didn't hear very many guitarists playing like that in the early 70's. I can picture him playing the bass notes and the lead melody of "The Day The Earth Stood Still" by Bernard Hermann. He is that kind of guitarist where he could figure out almost anything played by an orchestra to be transcribed for the guitar. On the "Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles, and Fripp he performs amazingly on Suite No. 1. King Crimson wasn't about guitar playing as much as it was composition. Fripp did some careful planning with Crimson. Especially the early recordings when he worked with Pete Sinfield.  


Posted By: American Khatru
Date Posted: May 10 2010 at 06:13
Originally posted by HTCF

Listen all the way through the song Fracture with the volume loud enough to pick up the quiet guitar in the middle

then listen to Starless

then listen to the guitar solo work on The Night Watch

then listen to his noodly guitar bits on Brian Eno's album Another Green World, especially the song Saint Elmo's Fire

then pick up the minimalist space jam album The Equatorial Stars by Fripp and Eno

That might be a good start

PS Rushfan4 told me to necropost here
Then listen to the acoustic guitar on Cirkus, carefully now, miss nothing (the in-betweens are as impressive as the parts that jump out).  You tell me, of all the electric guitarists out there who'll tear down the house once there's a little distorted warmth in the line, who else have this high level of skill and consistency on an unadulterated acoustic guitar?  Maybe you'll find, what, a few?

[edit: Cirkus, first track on album Lizard]



-------------

Why must my spell-checker continually underline the word "prog"?



Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: May 10 2010 at 09:49
Presto changeo, Robert Fripp is now amazing for you.
Wait a second, is it not working??? Tongue


-------------


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: May 10 2010 at 09:50
Originally posted by Slartibartfast

Presto changeo, Robert Fripp is now amazing for you.
Wait a second, is it not working??? Tongue
It really isn't working.  LOL 

-------------


Posted By: Kojak
Date Posted: May 10 2010 at 09:58
Originally posted by American Khatru

Originally posted by HTCF

Listen all the way through the song Fracture with the volume loud enough to pick up the quiet guitar in the middle

then listen to Starless

then listen to the guitar solo work on The Night Watch

then listen to his noodly guitar bits on Brian Eno's album Another Green World, especially the song Saint Elmo's Fire

then pick up the minimalist space jam album The Equatorial Stars by Fripp and Eno

That might be a good start

PS Rushfan4 told me to necropost here
Then listen to the acoustic guitar on Cirkus, carefully now, miss nothing (the in-betweens are as impressive as the parts that jump out).  You tell me, of all the electric guitarists out there who'll tear down the house once there's a little distorted warmth in the line, who else have this high level of skill and consistency on an unadulterated acoustic guitar?  Maybe you'll find, what, a few?

[edit: Cirkus, first track on album Lizard]



I really should have children, then sell their kidneys to pay for all the albums recommended on this site. Big smile


-------------


Posted By: Triceratopsoil
Date Posted: May 10 2010 at 18:05
Originally posted by rushfan4

Originally posted by Slartibartfast

Presto changeo, Robert Fripp is now amazing for you.
Wait a second, is it not working??? Tongue
It really isn't working.  LOL 


Did you actually follow my step-by-step instructions?


-------------
http://www.last.fm/user/TullDerGraff" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: The Monodrone
Date Posted: May 10 2010 at 18:34
Discipline has some very nice interlocking and layered guitars alongside Adrian Belew... it's not one of my favorite KC albums, but it has some very nice guitar work.  I also really like (some might find this weird) the solo from " I Talk to the WInd " from KC's first album.. i don't know , i just really like its tone and subleties.. so check that one out and, if you're like me, you might find it quite interesting.  Also, as stated before, The Power to Believe is definitely one of KC's better and more guitar-oriented albums of the last decade.

-------------
    


Posted By: harmonium.ro
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 10:25
I just found the most touching piece of guitar work I've listened to in years:  http://www.progarchives.com/mp3.asp?id=1401 - http://www.progarchives.com/mp3.asp?id=1401 (audio sample)

Makes me Cry, I Heart it...


-------------


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 10:47
Originally posted by harmonium.ro

I just found the most touching piece of guitar work I've listened to in years:  http://www.progarchives.com/mp3.asp?id=1401 - http://www.progarchives.com/mp3.asp?id=1401 (audio sample)

Makes me Cry, I Heart it...
Thanks Alex.  That was a nice piece of music.  Unfortunately, that is the kind of stuff that is better at putting me to sleep than getting my blood pumping.  It was too ambient for my tastes. 

-------------


Posted By: harmonium.ro
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 10:55
If you think that's too ambient, wait till you hear what he's doing now... Compared to what he's doing now, "Evening Star" is like a Hollywood action blockbuster LOL

-------------


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 11:05
Yikes! LOL

-------------


Posted By: ProgressiveAttic
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 14:05
This should make you love Fripp:
[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4W3wX2aX7_s[/tube]

If not... check Fracture out (the Starless and Bible Black or Great Deceiver version)...

If it doesn't work... you have no cure...



-------------
Michael's Sonic Kaleidoscope Mondays 5:00pm EST(re-runs Thursdays 3:00pm) @ Delicious Agony Progressive Rock Radio(http://www.deliciousagony.com)


Posted By: Triceratopsoil
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 17:32
For some reason that reminds me of Flight of the Bumblebee

-------------
http://www.last.fm/user/TullDerGraff" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 18:07
Originally posted by ProgressiveAttic

This should make you love Fripp:
[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4W3wX2aX7_s[/tube]

If not... check Fracture out (the Starless and Bible Black or Great Deceiver version)...

If it doesn't work... you have no cure...

That was some pretty good stuff there.    There may still be no cure for me. 

-------------


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 07 2010 at 18:28
Originally posted by ProgressiveAttic

This should make you love Fripp:
[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4W3wX2aX7_s[/tube]

If not... check Fracture out (the Starless and Bible Black or Great Deceiver version)...

If it doesn't work... you have no cure...


Now see I thought Fripp was amazing, but after hearing this I've become totally disenchanted with Robert.LOL

But seriously, I know a lot of people here who latched on to KC's itchycock first don't care for this one, but I love the humor or should I say humour? Tongue
Plus Fripp had developed his guitar style really well by then.


-------------


Posted By: Kestrel
Date Posted: June 12 2010 at 03:15

Fripp & Eno - Evening Star and Equatorial Stars are amazing albums. I didn't like ambient at all when I first heard it but now I put it along side progressive rock for favorite genre. Unfortunately there do not seem to be too many samples online.

I did find this though which is pretty cool - Fripp & Eno Live in 1975:

[TUBE]ZYvWTx6hQuk[/TUBE]



-------------


Posted By: The Runaway
Date Posted: June 14 2010 at 23:30
In one sentence: Fripp invented prog rock as we know it.

MIND=BLOWN


-------------
http://www.formspring.me/Aragorn224" rel="nofollow - Trendsetter win!

The search for nonexistent perfection.


Posted By: himtroy
Date Posted: June 14 2010 at 23:57
I agree with him being very good with Adrian alongside him.  But in my opinions his most dominant guitar came about in the Wetton era.  Songs like Fracture and many others in that 1973-1974 era.  Especially live.

-------------
Which of you to gain me, tell, will risk uncertain pains of hell?
I will not forgive you if you will not take the chance.


Posted By: Drummerboy
Date Posted: June 15 2010 at 09:13
Originally posted by himtroy

I agree with him being very good with Adrian alongside him.  But in my opinions his most dominant guitar came about in the Wetton era.  Songs like Fracture and many others in that 1973-1974 era.  Especially live.
 
 
Agree with all but the first sentence: with Adrian there came a lot of dischord/distortion that made me lose interest. But in the Lark's Tongue/Red period KC was untouchable; shatteringly powerful, so tight, and heavy (which does not mean just loud). Especially live as you say, unforgettable.


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: June 15 2010 at 14:09
I really loved what Adrian and Robert did together with Bill and Tony.  Larks and Starless and Red are pretty much my favorites though. The '80's would have probably really sucked for me, musically speaking. without what they did.  Discipline above all the rest of the three.


-------------


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: June 15 2010 at 14:31
Originally posted by Slartibartfast

I really loved what Adrian and Robert did together with Bill and Tony.  Larks and Starless and Red are pretty much my favorites though. The '80's would have probably really sucked for me, musically speaking. without what they did.  Discipline above all the rest of the three.


Red is, for me, one of the most important prog albums ever made, and should melt the heart of even the most assured sceptic, but I do agree re discipline, which remains a seminal album of its decade.


-------------


In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: darkshade
Date Posted: June 16 2010 at 01:22
think about some of those KC songs man, there's some evil stuff going on, forget all the death metal and black metal. i dare say Fripp has written some of the most evil and petrifying music ever conceived by anyone (without being corny)

and then he has written some of the most beautiful music ever. sometimes intertwined with the dark tri-tones or heavy riffs. some KC music has brought me to the edge of tears. other times to the gates of hell themselves.

and then there's the 80s era where i feel like im in this strange world and things are bouncing around Cool

TPTB is crazy too, probably the most insane album post-Red, it heavy, scary, beautiful, evil, electronic, and gripping. this can be said about most of his albums.

that's amazing

btw im having deja vu...


-------------
http://www.last.fm/user/MysticBoogy" rel="nofollow - My Last.fm


Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: June 16 2010 at 01:49
This might be my favorite Fripp guitar solo of all time, it starts at 1:32

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=draua97qH1Y - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=draua97qH1Y

If you don't think this is amazing, go sign up for a Michael Jackson forum or something.



Print Page | Close Window

Bulletin Board Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 9.69 - http://www.webwizforums.com
Copyright ©2001-2010 Web Wiz - http://www.webwiz.co.uk