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A good proggy bass guitar!

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Topic: A good proggy bass guitar!
Posted By: The_Jester
Subject: A good proggy bass guitar!
Date Posted: July 05 2012 at 19:42
I'd like to buy a new bass guitar somedays. I was wandering how much should I save for a good bass guitar and what are the best bass guitar I could try. I'd like to have a proggy sound. Like a signature sound. Or maybe something unusual. I always wonder if there's an unknown company out there that makes quality basses who are cheaper than the big names.

I already have:

A Douglas (Hofner imitation) bass wich is the first I bought.
An Ergodyne Ibanez
A Takamine acoustic bass
And
A Gibson SG bass


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La victoire est éphémère mais la gloire est éternelle!

- Napoléon Bonaparte



Replies:
Posted By: Flyingsod
Date Posted: July 06 2012 at 18:54
Just the  well known Rickenbacher comes to my mind. I'm no bassist but as a progger I would def have one of these if I were.

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Posted By: The_Jester
Date Posted: July 06 2012 at 19:08
< ="" ="text/" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0"> I know, the only thing is the price of the bass. I'm always looking for extraordinary deals but it never happens...

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La victoire est éphémère mais la gloire est éternelle!

- Napoléon Bonaparte


Posted By: Andy Webb
Date Posted: July 06 2012 at 20:09
Yea Rickenbackers are ridiculous sometimes. 

My friend got an Ernie Ball Music Man for $300-something a few years ago. It plays beautifully. 


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http://ow.ly/8ymqg" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: The_Jester
Date Posted: July 06 2012 at 20:38
< ="" ="text/" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">
Originally posted by Andy Webb Andy Webb wrote:

Yea Rickenbackers are ridiculous sometimes. 

My friend got an Ernie Ball Music Man for $300-something a few years ago. It plays beautifully. 
 
A real music man for 300$!!!! That's impossible! These are super hard to find under 900$ and the average price is about 1200$! Your friend's a really lucky guy.


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La victoire est éphémère mais la gloire est éternelle!

- Napoléon Bonaparte


Posted By: Andy Webb
Date Posted: July 06 2012 at 23:06
Originally posted by The_Jester The_Jester wrote:

< ="" ="text/" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">
Originally posted by Andy Webb Andy Webb wrote:

Yea Rickenbackers are ridiculous sometimes. 

My friend got an Ernie Ball Music Man for $300-something a few years ago. It plays beautifully. 
 
A real music man for 300$!!!! That's impossible! These are super hard to find under 900$ and the average price is about 1200$! Your friend's a really lucky guy.

It was a Black Friday deal at Guitar Center. He was stoked to say the least. LOL


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http://ow.ly/8ymqg" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: frippism
Date Posted: July 06 2012 at 23:30
Honestly it's all about technique, effects, and amplification. I have a Japanese pbass and along with a distortion pedal can get a hell of a lot of sounds

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There be dragons


Posted By: The_Jester
Date Posted: July 07 2012 at 23:07

A Japanese Fender P-Bass? Because these ones are really valueable, japaneses make quality basses.



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La victoire est éphémère mais la gloire est éternelle!

- Napoléon Bonaparte


Posted By: frippism
Date Posted: July 07 2012 at 23:28
most Japanese basses I played are great if not fantastic. But they're still fairly cheap the 90s standard ones still go for 700$ or less. I got mine for 650$ if I remember from this guys who lived in a basement in Queens :D

He also had an 80s Fretless which, while it had dings and scratches, played great for 400$ and to this day I'm kicking myself for not buying it.


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There be dragons


Posted By: The_Jester
Date Posted: July 08 2012 at 00:00
< ="" ="text/" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0"> Sometimes you find great deals! I paid my SG bass 675$ and I find it's really worth it.

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La victoire est éphémère mais la gloire est éternelle!

- Napoléon Bonaparte


Posted By: Moshimword
Date Posted: July 10 2012 at 14:38
If you're looking for something a bit different you could look at Traben, they're a smallish company from the US, their basses are cheap compared to the big names. I find they have a lot of tonal flexibility and great sustain, really comfortable to play to.

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www.handtheband.com - My bands website, female fronted prog metal.


Posted By: The_Jester
Date Posted: July 11 2012 at 00:15
Thanks for the tip!

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La victoire est éphémère mais la gloire est éternelle!

- Napoléon Bonaparte


Posted By: sturoc
Date Posted: July 11 2012 at 17:51
Find the bass that :
Is comfortable for your hands even after playing for an hour or so.
Sounds the way you want it to sound -or close to it. Adding f/x and tailoring your tone will be an interesting challenge unless you love it right from the beginning.
Looks are only as important as you make it and unless your playing out should only matter to you.
Keep it affordable for you, unless you absolutely fall in love 100% with it.
 
A reminder that the other half of this choice is also the amp you 'll be using, be aware what may sound great in the store thru a different amp setup may not be what your hearing once you get it home.

There are alot of great people making great basses, some unknown for the most part. Don't be put off by a supposedly unheard of name...remember: see above.



Posted By: FreakFlagRecordings
Date Posted: July 27 2012 at 06:48
Guild B301 looks class. Unfortunately I've never played one myself. Someday!


Posted By: sturoc
Date Posted: July 30 2012 at 11:09
I had a B-301 with Dimarzio Split-P pickup in it.
Bought it new early 80s immediately did the retrofit.
Great bass a little neck heavy but long scale.
Awesome tone very progressive sound.
They now command a high price though, if you can find one .
I rarely used a pick and either way it sounded very close to a Rick !

Ahhh, the old days..



Posted By: Josh18293
Date Posted: August 20 2012 at 13:11
R
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C
K
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N
B
A
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K
E
R

Wink


Posted By: Angelo
Date Posted: August 21 2012 at 15:28
Rickenbackers sound great, but their awful to play - at least for me. I think Sturoc more or less nailed the issue - get a bass that feels good for you, and add the prog yourself.

For me, it's prog and blues all the way with either of these four beauties: Godin A4 fretless, Fender Jazz, Ibanez SR3005 Prestige and a Gretsch Broadkaster.
I have to admit that I replaced the Godin's piezo with a Hanson Chisonic, and the jazz has Hanson JSonics replacing the Fender pick ups. Sometimes changing a part is sufficient to make an 'ok'  bass into a 'yes!' bass.


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http://www.hulshout.nl/rfm" rel="nofollow - My blog: Angelo's Rock Orphanage


Posted By: The_Jester
Date Posted: August 22 2012 at 09:53
< ="" ="text/" ="/B1D671CF-E532-4481-99AA-19F420D90332etdefender/huidhui.js?0=0&0=0&0=0">
Originally posted by Angelo Angelo wrote:

Rickenbackers sound great, but their awful to play - at least for me. I think Sturoc more or less nailed the issue - get a bass that feels good for you, and add the prog yourself.

For me, it's prog and blues all the way with either of these four beauties: Godin A4 fretless, Fender Jazz, Ibanez SR3005 Prestige and a Gretsch Broadkaster.
I have to admit that I replaced the Godin's piezo with a Hanson Chisonic, and the jazz has Hanson JSonics replacing the Fender pick ups. Sometimes changing a part is sufficient to make an 'ok'  bass into a 'yes!' bass.
 
Or into a 'Yes' bass! (bad word play Cool)


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La victoire est éphémère mais la gloire est éternelle!

- Napoléon Bonaparte


Posted By: zerothehero76
Date Posted: August 23 2012 at 01:30
At the present moment, I'm playing very often a mexican Fender Jazz Classic 70's. Adding some drive (I use tech 21 VT Bass) , it has the "right growl". It is comfortable and it is also capable of quite "warm" sounds. And doesn't cost too much.
In this recording I used a Squier Vintage Modified Fretless, a Musicman stingray (the harmonics part) and the classic 70's (for the solo):  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4iDRtbESCY" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4iDRtbESCY


Posted By: Meta
Date Posted: August 23 2012 at 09:16
For the bassist on a budget, Mexican made Fenders can sound and play very good. There is a lot of variance from the factory so you'll need to play a bunch of them to find a good one. The key to look for on any bolt on necked instrument, guitar or bass, is the tightness of the neck joint and the resonance. If a guitar or bass is very resonant, you will feel it in your chest when you play it. Don't worry too much about electronics, you can replace those later. The resonance is not something that can be helped very much by hardware upgrades.
 
A good way to compare similar instruments is to pluck the D string (or the B string on guitars) as they are hanging on the wall then then feel the body of the guitar on the lower right side, near the controls. More resonants instruments will vibrate more and you can feel it. This will let you know which ones to try out and which ones to dismiss outright.


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http://www.heavymeta.net" rel="nofollow - Meta's Official Website


Posted By: Angelo
Date Posted: December 24 2012 at 06:51
Originally posted by Angelo Angelo wrote:

Rickenbackers sound great, but their awful to play - at least for me. I think Sturoc more or less nailed the issue - get a bass that feels good for you, and add the prog yourself.

For me, it's prog and blues all the way with either of these four beauties: Godin A4 fretless, Fender Jazz, Ibanez SR3005 Prestige and a Gretsch Broadkaster.
I have to admit that I replaced the Godin's piezo with a Hanson Chisonic, and the jazz has Hanson JSonics replacing the Fender pick ups. Sometimes changing a part is sufficient to make an 'ok'  bass into a 'yes!' bass.

I went a bit further than that. I got rid of the Godin altogether, and replaced it with a self assembled bass: Allparts fretless neck, ebony on maple with a black headstock, a Warmoth Z body in Black Korina, with a Black Korina top, Nordstrand Vintage P/J pickups, a Hipshot Vintage bridge and Schaller light tuners. See my avatar for the result... and I can assure you it sounds as good as it looks.


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http://www.hulshout.nl/rfm" rel="nofollow - My blog: Angelo's Rock Orphanage


Posted By: TheFarMeadow
Date Posted: December 24 2012 at 16:50
Ah the ole B301 - i had one once - sounded and played lovely, but I found it a bit unbalanced towards the neck. 

I agree it's all about technique - it's how you make the strings work. A good articulate bass rig is also important for live work. Playing is about comfort and efficiency. I use a couple of Yamaha TRBII 5 strings about 10 year old Japanese ones, with and without frets. Comfortable, not too heavy, play and sound great. Yamaha know how to deliver great value and consistency - worth checking out.

The TRBs have a 35" scale. Don't know if that makes a significant difference to string tension?




Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: December 25 2012 at 09:24
ALBERTO RIGONI---THREE WISE MONKEYS

JOEY VERA---CIRCLES

JON JOWITT-- the entire DARK MATTER album from IQ



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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: Angelo
Date Posted: December 26 2012 at 06:03
I think you missed the point of this topic.... apart from that, you're right.

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http://www.hulshout.nl/rfm" rel="nofollow - My blog: Angelo's Rock Orphanage


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: December 27 2012 at 22:06
Originally posted by Angelo Angelo wrote:

I think you missed the point of this topic.... apart from that, you're right.


You are right. I did. Allow myself to fix this.

If I may elaborate more keenly on how a bass should sound with in a progressive band it should

1) never sound like background filler
2) should be heard!! Most bass is muffled where guitar and drums take over. Bass should be heard loud and clear. The more recent Neo prog albums, IQ's DARK MATTER JOWITT is heard wonderfully and clearly and uses a Rickenbacker nicely on the track HARVEST OF SOULS. It's how bass should be!!

3) Lastly, should be distinguished. Bass should not sound repetitive or prosaic. John Myung of Dream Theater did a wonderful job on the latest DT record, A DRAMATIC TURN OF EVENTS. I could hear him loud and clear and his note composition was sublime. Very well done

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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: sturoc
Date Posted: December 29 2012 at 00:43
again: Remember Its not how many notes you play, but what you leave out.

and yes Far Meadow, that B-301 was headstock heavy for sure !

OP, Let us know what you ever did get ?


Posted By: Angelo
Date Posted: January 20 2013 at 05:29
I guess the OP should know by now, it's been 6 months....

@progbethyname: spot on, provided that you add that this (apart from the Rick reference) should be irrespective of the bass that is being used.


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http://www.hulshout.nl/rfm" rel="nofollow - My blog: Angelo's Rock Orphanage


Posted By: synthguy
Date Posted: March 11 2013 at 12:04
For me Two basses come to mind the Rickenbacker 4001/4003 and the Fender Jazz Bass. Someone posted earlier about the mexican made jazz basses. I have one and it's awesome, granted I needed to tweak the set up on the thing, intonation/action, but if you're a hands on kind of guy/girl you can do it yourself. Mine plays very well now.

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Wearing feelings on our faces when our faces took a rest...


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: April 07 2013 at 15:57
Originally posted by Angelo Angelo wrote:

Rickenbackers sound great, but their awful to play - at least for me. I think Sturoc more or less nailed the issue - get a bass that feels good for you, and add the prog yourself.
...
 
I'm wondering if folks are getting scattered on a Rickey ... what made Squire famous on them was not the bass itself ... it might have helped ... but the fact that he had some special wiring done on his bass that made things rather interesting ... and according to him and "Bass Player" when he was on, it was the start of "stereo" pickups ... he wanted the pick ups split so he could have them do different things on them! This will give the impression that the guitar is the trick, and it is not at all.
 
It's the person behind it ... plain and simple ... soyou gonna tell me that Chris can not make a cheapie Fender Squier not sound good? ... you don't know Chris!
 
And the so called "proggy bass" is really sad of a question ... and pretty soon folks will be asking for a good "proggy guitar" ... like the Fender Telecaster can not play anything out there ... sorry ... didn't mean to blow up the thread, but that's really scary ... spend your money on a Rickey and get disappointed because you don't sound like Chris! Because you did not find out why!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: sturoc
Date Posted: April 08 2013 at 18:11
The Rick-o-Sound option has been around since the early 60s, Chris Squire did not invent it.

The original OP merely wanted advice on what instrument(s) would do well for the range of tones Progressive rock can demand.


Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: April 08 2013 at 21:38
OK, I've been playing bass since I was about 16...I'm 57, so that's uh, 40 years?

I've met Squire, Percy Jones, damn near everybody over the years.  Bass parts in prog music tend to involve rapidity, key changes, lots of movement up & down the neck....the signature basses also tend to sound "punchier" (more mid-range) than the thumpier basses of the '60s Mo-Town funk sound for example. 

Keys include:

a) easy playing bass - I have a 1973 Rick 4001, it's an excellent instrument, but it is also a full-scale beast, so I'm not as proficient on this as I am on shorter scale instruments like the Gibson Triumph (my main Prog bass), Guild JS-2 and others.  Squire played a fretless Guild JS-2 on "The Remembering" from TFTO, it is a fine instrument. 

Figure out your hand size by playing several....you own the Gibson SG bass, which is short-scale, so that may be what you want to focus on. 

b) strings - the signature prog-bass sound is generated from classic roundwound strings.  Many players (including myself) swear by Roto-Sound, but other strings can give you a similar, bright sound for less money.  I tend to play lighter string gauges as I get older, they are easier to press down and bend. 

c) manufacturer - as noted, the Rick is heavily used in prog, almost to the point of caricature!  Squire, Camp, Bennett and Strater all played one.  Other popular basses include the Fender Precision (John Wetton), Fender Jazz (Geddy Lee, Greg Lake), Music Man (Tony Levin) and various custom models (Percy Jones).   Note the fretless bass I'm playing in my icon....that's a Hugh Manson custom, similar to the bass used by John Paul Jones.  Manson makes guitars for Matthew Bellamy, Martin Barre & is the tech to Steve Howe, so seek out a local builder & see if you can make a deal!  

d) style - I play with both fingers and plectrum, but prefer to use a pick for speed, sound and technique such as "tremelo picking" (which emulates a tympani, listen to Squire on "The Remembering").  Sometimes I switch within a song, but I usually use a pick for its precision and clarity of sound. 

Here, this is mine!  No matter what, just play and have a blast!  There are no shortages of excellent instruments these days, and the Korean models today are nearly as good as Japanese guitars years back.  




Posted By: infocat
Date Posted: April 08 2013 at 22:44
Simple (?) question for you bassy's out there...  the necks on bass guitars seem to be longer than those on regular guitars.  Why?  (In layman's terms, please!)



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--
Frank Swarbrick
Belief is not Truth.


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: April 10 2013 at 15:30
Originally posted by cstack3 cstack3 wrote:

Keys include:
a) easy playing bass -
b) strings -
c) manufacturer -
d) style -
...
 
So, again ... you are suggesting that you would not do the same thing for a guitar, keyboard or drumset?
 
It's a bizarre question ... all guitar players would look for a guitar that is "easy" for their hands and fingers, or they would not be able to do their stuff .... everyone has favorite strings that suit their sound better .... many folks use special instruments built to their own preferable specs ... style ... wow!!!!!
 
It's the same thing ... the question is nutz!
 
How about asking next for a good "proggy groupie" ... ??? (... we could have fun with that one!)


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: sturoc
Date Posted: April 10 2013 at 16:46
Originally posted by infocat infocat wrote:

Simple (?) question for you bassy's out there...  the necks on bass guitars seem to be longer than those on regular guitars.  Why?  (In layman's terms, please!)


The scale (neck)  is longer due to the lower octaves the bass strings handle.


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: April 14 2013 at 17:17
Originally posted by sturoc sturoc wrote:

Originally posted by infocat infocat wrote:

Simple (?) question for you bassy's out there...  the necks on bass guitars seem to be longer than those on regular guitars.  Why?  (In layman's terms, please!)


The scale (neck)  is longer due to the lower octaves the bass strings handle.
 
Again ... ALL instruments are different ... so what?  And it's like saying that the same bass can not be played in rock or any other music. And that is plain wrong!
 
Again ... let's talk about a "proggy guitar" next ... stop evading the idea and see the point! How about a "proggy drum set!" ... that would go over well! I like this one better ... a "proggy drum set" ... probably has to have 12 toms (like Carl Palmer), 437 cymbals like Bozzio, and ... where's the drummer? like Mike!
 
An instrument is an instrument and any of them can play a multitude of different things. So suggesting that the Rickey is proggy, is like saying that Paul McCartney is an idiot and using the wrong bass! Ohhh btw, there is more progressive stuff in those days on a Fender Jazz, or Precision, than there is a Rickey! Bahhhhumbug ... the Fender is not a "proggy" bass?


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: April 14 2013 at 18:23
^ as off the plot as ever Pedro  LOL
 
 
Originally posted by sturoc sturoc wrote:

Originally posted by infocat infocat wrote:

Simple (?) question for you bassy's out there...  the necks on bass guitars seem to be longer than those on regular guitars.  Why?  (In layman's terms, please!)


The scale (neck)  is longer due to the lower octaves the bass strings handle.
That isn't the whole story. Like with a regualr guitars, the neck-lengh of a bass guitar can vary depending on the model (usually from 30" to 36") - often you will see these called short-neck and long-neck or short-scale and long-scale. This measurement refers to the vibration length of the string (distance from nut to bridge) and this length, along with the string tension and the string thickness (technically it is linear mass density, but that is proportional to the thickness, which is proportional to the weight) determines the note that an plucked open string will sound. In theory you can make a bass guitar with the same neck-length as a regular guitar, you would just need to fit it with heavier strings and reduce the tension.
 
This means that for a bass guitar to be in tune the strings have to be of a certain length, certain thickness and "tuned" to a certain tension. If we change the neck length we will need to either change the string tension, or change the string thickness to play the same note - both of these changes will affect the tone of the note (ie it change the harmonics). Usually on a long-scale bass you will used lighter weight strings and higher tension to produce a harder, more defined bass note to the softer tone of the short-scale playing the same pitched note.
 
Tone is the overriding factor, but choice of instrument is also deteremined by the length of your fingers - a long-neck has wider fret-spacings which can be difficult for short-fingered players.


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"You know what uranium is, right?
It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
Including some bad things.
But nobody talks about that."


Posted By: infocat
Date Posted: April 14 2013 at 20:33
Can't say I understand all of that, but thanks for the explanation!



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--
Frank Swarbrick
Belief is not Truth.


Posted By: sturoc
Date Posted: April 16 2013 at 09:02
Dean you touch upon a few good tech points there.
 Though infocat said in" laymans terms" which  I put simply,  as evidenced by his reply.
A violin vs Double bass, Mandolin vs guitar vs bass, on and on.

As for the moshkito .... Ya gotta lighten up abit here man. the OP is simply asking a question based on what he knows and doesn't know. He obviously has seen progressive bands that may use the same instrumentation and brand/models and likes what he hears. The good responses here direct him well but he will have to figure out what's good for him when he plays a particular brand, model , etc.

It's all about the sound/ music anyways.


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: April 16 2013 at 11:38
Originally posted by sturoc sturoc wrote:

Dean you touch upon a few good tech points there.
 Though infocat said in" laymans terms" which  I put simply,  as evidenced by his reply.
A violin vs Double bass, Mandolin vs guitar vs bass, on and on.
Except that's not the whole story, nor is it the reason for the size difference. A bass guitar can be the same size as a regular guitar and still play an octave lower - the size difference is for the tone not the pitch and that's as "layman" as I can get.

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"You know what uranium is, right?
It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
Including some bad things.
But nobody talks about that."


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: April 16 2013 at 15:00
Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by sturoc sturoc wrote:

Dean you touch upon a few good tech points there.
 Though infocat said in" laymans terms" which  I put simply,  as evidenced by his reply.
A violin vs Double bass, Mandolin vs guitar vs bass, on and on.
Except that's not the whole story, nor is it the reason for the size difference. A bass guitar can be the same size as a regular guitar and still play an octave lower - the size difference is for the tone not the pitch and that's as "layman" as I can get.
 
I love it ... like ripping the Ricky in "prog" ...
 
I think it important to help folks know what the music is about ... but to state outright and blindly, that it is because of a sound ... is totally insane ... heck ... PFM and Banco even used the concert basses many times ... but that is ... being ignored! And not progressive? ... who needs an expensive Ricky? Ohhh heck, ELO played Cellos and other low strings too! We should really check all those pictures and how many Fender Jazz basses you can find ... and that is not "proggy"?
 
NOW, if the idea is for the person to buy one? ... I would tell him ... hard to suggest ... really is ... but these days the Bogey Man 5 string is becoming real popular, specially in the metal areas with folks like John Myung ripping the 5 and 6 string on these ... I probably would by a nice Stratus Graphite 5 string bass (similar to Guy Pratt's), or go with a nice Warwick 5 string of some kind ... if not a nice 5 String ESP or Shecter. My hand is too smal for a 6 string.  We haven't even got to the "Bitch" and some of the other experimental instruments that only Levin and a handful of folks are good enough, or, more than likely, brave enough to play!  The majority of rock/progressive bass, is not worth the discussion musically and you can teach any ten year old! We can exclude Chris Squire and the like in his early days, I suppose!
 
Ohhh ... btw ... if you want an even more "proggy" bass, even the "Bitch", or the ones that Levin and friends are playing around with, would be way more "proggy" than the ones you even consider!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: April 16 2013 at 15:19
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Originally posted by Dean Dean wrote:

Originally posted by sturoc sturoc wrote:

Dean you touch upon a few good tech points there.
 Though infocat said in" laymans terms" which  I put simply,  as evidenced by his reply.
A violin vs Double bass, Mandolin vs guitar vs bass, on and on.
Except that's not the whole story, nor is it the reason for the size difference. A bass guitar can be the same size as a regular guitar and still play an octave lower - the size difference is for the tone not the pitch and that's as "layman" as I can get.
 
I love it ... like ripping the Ricky in "prog" ...
 
I think it important to help folks know what the music is about ... but to state outright and blindly, that it is because of a sound ... is totally insane ... heck ... PFM and Banco even used the concert basses many times ... but that is ... being ignored! And not progressive? ... who needs an expensive Ricky? Ohhh heck, ELO played Cellos and other low strings too!
 
NOW, if the idea is for the person to buy one? ... I would tell him ... bad idea ... but these days the Bogey Man 5 string is becoming real popular and will likely make the Ricky sound bad and cheap one of these days! Me? ... I probably would by a nice Stratus Graphite 5 string bass (similar to Guy Pratt's), or go with a nice Warwick 5 string of some kind ... if not a nice 5 String ESP or Shecter. My hand is too smal for a 6 string. Ohhh ... btw ... if you want an even more "proggy" bass, even the "Bitch", or the ones that Levin and friends are playing around with, would be way more "proggy" than the ones you even consider!
Which has got absolutely nothing to do with my post, but thanks anyway.

-------------
"You know what uranium is, right?
It’s this thing called nuclear weapons.
And other things.
Like lots of things are done with uranium.
Including some bad things.
But nobody talks about that."


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: June 29 2013 at 12:18
It's not the bass that makes it "proggy" but how it's setup and played.  When I played bass in late 70's prog bands I had an Ibanez Rocket Roll Flying V bass.  Beautiful instrument.  Then in the early 90's I finally played a Rick 4001...OMG it was the smoothest playing most tonally versatile bass I'd ever played.  Got a great deal on a used 1 for about $500 (in 1991) and have never cheated on her with another bass since.  A Rick doesn't mean you'll sound like Squire or Geddy, it's all in the signal processing and type of strings (rounds or flats).  A great feature of the 4001 is a separate output for bridge and neck pickups.  I get a mind blowing sound by running the neck pickup clean and the bridge pickup throught a distortion box.

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https://wytchcrypt.wixsite.com/mutiny-in-jonestown" rel="nofollow - Mutiny in Jonestown : Progressive Rock Since 1987


Posted By: ESHWOR KC
Date Posted: July 01 2013 at 23:48
i would love to buy thatSmile


Posted By: chopper
Date Posted: July 02 2013 at 07:00
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

A Rick doesn't mean you'll sound like Squire or Geddy,
 
How true that is. I've always loved the Ricky sound and thought the best bass sound ever was on side one of "Hemispheres" but then I eventually found that Geddy played that on a Fender. A lot of the Geddy sound comes from his finger technique.
 
I use a Warwick and get quite a good "proggy" sound with a bit of distortion from my Fender Rumble 350 combo.  Not quite the old Ricky sound but it's good enough (as I don't play in a prog band anyway).


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: July 02 2013 at 10:04
Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

A Rick doesn't mean you'll sound like Squire or Geddy,
 
How true that is. I've always loved the Ricky sound and thought the best bass sound ever was on side one of "Hemispheres" but then I eventually found that Geddy played that on a Fender. A lot of the Geddy sound comes from his finger technique.

I remember the first time I saw Chris Squire playing a Fender, I thought, "Oh no, why are you doing this?" Cry   Same with Geddy and his Fender Jazz bass.


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https://wytchcrypt.wixsite.com/mutiny-in-jonestown" rel="nofollow - Mutiny in Jonestown : Progressive Rock Since 1987


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: July 03 2013 at 00:25
Listen. I was really blown away with NICK BEGG's performance on the track LUMINOL off the new STEVEN WILSON album, THE RAVEN THAT REFUSED TO SING. So well done. It was crunchy and fast!! Took center stage too!

Also. Post-Rock's OSI's opening track 'SURE YOU WILL' off FREE by JOEY VERA is Outstanding. Provides an excellent intro to a great song. :)

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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: Gerinski
Date Posted: July 03 2013 at 02:36
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

these days the Bogey Man 5 string is becoming real popular, specially in the metal areas with folks like John Myung ripping the 5 and 6 string on these ... 
I think you meant Music Man (by Earnie Ball)


Posted By: chopper
Date Posted: July 03 2013 at 06:35
Originally posted by progbethyname progbethyname wrote:

Listen. I was really blown away with NICK BEGG's performance on the track LUMINOL off the new STEVEN WILSON album, THE RAVEN THAT REFUSED TO SING. So well done. It was crunchy and fast!! Took center stage too! 
 
Clap


Posted By: Gerinski
Date Posted: July 03 2013 at 06:42
I have a humble Peavey 'Fender Precision copy',  it's nothing to recommend particularly but for my level it produces acceptable enough sounds.


Posted By: tszirmay
Date Posted: July 07 2013 at 11:58
Its time for me to live out my lifelong fantasy and get a bass guitar, since I am such a fan! I am thinking of getting a starter = The Peavey Millennium BXP 4-String Bass Guitar. Reviews say that its a great value and easy playablility. 
I will be getting some effects pedals as well , really go crazy on the sound.


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"The more I analyze the human race, the more I love my dog" Mme de Stael


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: July 07 2013 at 17:41
Oh how about JON JOWITT on the title track of the album, SUBTERANEA.
Jesus. I don't know what kind of bass he has, but it thumps my ears off! So awesome.

Also. I just want to say that ever since I bought the Sennheiser HD800 headphones I've been more if an admirer of solid bass playing...largely because I can f**king hear now!
I'm sorry, but HD headphones are mandatory for quality prog listening experiences. ;)

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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: July 07 2013 at 17:48
Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:

Originally posted by progbethyname progbethyname wrote:

Listen. I was really blown away with NICK BEGG's performance on the track LUMINOL off the new STEVEN WILSON album, THE RAVEN THAT REFUSED TO SING. So well done. It was crunchy and fast!! Took center stage too! 

 

Clap


It's up for album of the year in the PROG ROCK awards run by prog rock magazine.
I think it will win. I was surprised to see the latest Spocks Beard effort to be nominated as well.


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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: The Neck Romancer
Date Posted: August 11 2013 at 16:59
I've got a fretless Geddy Lee Jazz Bass and an Ibanez BTB575FM. 35" scale, heavy Rotosounds, excellent active EQ, too bad it requires two 9V batteries.






That's not my picture, btw. I also have a cheap Chinese double bass but it hasn't seen use with a group (yet). Both of those basses have EXCELLENT tones (the Ibanez is really versatile and the B string sounds perfect) but, if I could do it, I'd sell them both and buy two Wals.

A Mark III Wal with these exact configurations but fretted...


... and a fretless Mark I Wal just like Colin Edwin's.



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Posted By: Bobby J
Date Posted: January 30 2018 at 23:00
USA Fender Jazz Bass, great Prog Bass, great bass period, I also own the Geddy Lee Jazz bass, Mexican version great bass


Posted By: SteveG
Date Posted: January 31 2018 at 04:00
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

It's not the bass that makes it "proggy" but how it's setup and played.  When I played bass in late 70's prog bands I had an Ibanez Rocket Roll Flying V bass.  Beautiful instrument.  Then in the early 90's I finally played a Rick 4001...OMG it was the smoothest playing most tonally versatile bass I'd ever played.  Got a great deal on a used 1 for about $500 (in 1991) and have never cheated on her with another bass since.  A Rick doesn't mean you'll sound like Squire or Geddy, it's all in the signal processing and type of strings (rounds or flats).  A great feature of the 4001 is a separate output for bridge and neck pickups.  I get a mind blowing sound by running the neck pickup clean and the bridge pickup throught a distortion box.
So did Chris Squire on Fragile. Except he used a Fender guitar amp for neck pickup and a bass amp for bridge pickup, I believe.

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"Madonna and Lady Gaga are prog, Parliament/Funkadelic are more prog than the Beatles ever were.....Wrap your closed mind around that." said the joker to the thief.


Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: January 31 2018 at 05:13
Usually, any bassist who chooses a Rickenbacker as his (her) bass, is a champion for me.
.......I love you, Kyoko Kanazawa....


Posted By: Davesax1965
Date Posted: January 31 2018 at 05:33
The one guarantee I can make is that you won't find a Rick cheap. Unless you go for a Chinese Rickenbacker clone, AKA a Chickenbacker.

The last time I had a chance to buy a Rick 4003 at a reasonable price was in the mid 80's, when no one wanted them. I had the money in my pocket at the time. Things are slightly different now. ;-)

I can't recommend a Rick as the double truss rod system is a hideous idea. If not properly adjusted, Ricks tend to have all kinds of neck problems. They really are overpriced rubbish. 

Going through a list of "prog" basses - nor would I go for a Precision bass if I wanted a cutting, solo sound. Personally, I'd go for a Gibson EB-3 or the excellent Epiphone copy or a Jazz. The Squier Classic Player 60's jazz is excellent, pretty cheap and you can get some interesting noises out of it. 

If you want to go high end, try a WAL. If you can find one. Other options are also Thunderbirds, but they may a bit thuddy. 

Personally, I use a Danelectro Longhorn short scale for my bass work. But then again, I've never been conventional in my bass tastes. ;-)

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MACCLESFIELD ILLUMINATI
https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/


Posted By: Davesax1965
Date Posted: January 31 2018 at 05:34
PS Try looking at Warwicks as well. 

By the way, I do play bass. For solo prog rock noises, I'd be tempted to go single coil rather than humbuckers. 

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MACCLESFIELD ILLUMINATI
https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/


Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: January 31 2018 at 06:52
Originally posted by Davesax1965 Davesax1965 wrote:

The one guarantee I can make is that you won't find a Rick cheap. Unless you go for a Chinese Rickenbacker clone, AKA a Chickenbacker.

The last time I had a chance to buy a Rick 4003 at a reasonable price was in the mid 80's, when no one wanted them. I had the money in my pocket at the time. Things are slightly different now. ;-)

I can't recommend a Rick as the double truss rod system is a hideous idea. If not properly adjusted, Ricks tend to have all kinds of neck problems. They really are overpriced rubbish. 

Going through a list of "prog" basses - nor would I go for a Precision bass if I wanted a cutting, solo sound. Personally, I'd go for a Gibson EB-3 or the excellent Epiphone copy or a Jazz. The Squier Classic Player 60's jazz is excellent, pretty cheap and you can get some interesting noises out of it. 

If you want to go high end, try a WAL. If you can find one. Other options are also Thunderbirds, but they may a bit thuddy. 

Personally, I use a Danelectro Longhorn short scale for my bass work. But then again, I've never been conventional in my bass tastes. ;-)
My Ricky is a 4001, 1980 make. It needs some work, but plYs well. I love it. I’m always awkward when I’m playing a mate’s P-Bass for recordings.........


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: January 31 2018 at 08:40
Hi,

Just a question about all this ... with all the electronics that everyone can get these days, wouldn't even a cheap bass be able to imitate something else? 

It seems rather strange to me, that you have to buy a Stratavarious, in order to get a good violin sound (so to speak!), when you can easily replicate it nowadays with some reasonable electronics, at a very do'able price? 

I imagine that as one gets more proficient that he/she would want the real thing itself ... but that might be just me thinking at this point. 

I have an Epiphone EB-3 (hard on my small fingers), and a short scale Ibanez that I have not gotten to fool around with enough yet!


-------------
... none of the hits, none of the time ... now you know what the art is all about!
www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Davesax1965
Date Posted: January 31 2018 at 09:25
Simple answer - "not really". 

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MACCLESFIELD ILLUMINATI
https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/


Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: February 28 2018 at 16:54
Originally posted by Davesax1965 Davesax1965 wrote:

The one guarantee I can make is that you won't find a Rick cheap. Unless you go for a Chinese Rickenbacker clone, AKA a Chickenbacker.
.

LMAO!

Originally posted by Davesax1965 Davesax1965 wrote:

Personally, I use a Danelectro Longhorn short scale for my bass work. But then again, I've never been conventional in my bass tastes. ;-)

How much was it?


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http://www.ebay.com/sch/musicosm/m.html?_ipg=50&_sop=1&_rdc=1" rel="nofollow - http://www.ebay.com/sch/musicosm/m.html?_ipg=50&_sop=1&_rdc=1


Posted By: Davesax1965
Date Posted: March 04 2018 at 08:17
This is the same 2006 reissue as mine. Not sure how much my particular reissue goes for now, you can't get them anymore. Besides, I'm in the UK. Have a look on eBay. 




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MACCLESFIELD ILLUMINATI
https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/


Posted By: Davesax1965
Date Posted: March 04 2018 at 10:03
As a PS, A Chickenbacker is a normal term for a Chinese Rickenbacker clone. 

See also Chibson. ;-)

-------------
MACCLESFIELD ILLUMINATI
https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/


Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: March 04 2018 at 10:51
Chibson just doesn't have the same ring to it. ;)


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http://www.ebay.com/sch/musicosm/m.html?_ipg=50&_sop=1&_rdc=1" rel="nofollow - http://www.ebay.com/sch/musicosm/m.html?_ipg=50&_sop=1&_rdc=1


Posted By: chopper
Date Posted: March 04 2018 at 10:54
Originally posted by moshkito moshkito wrote:

Hi,

Just a question about all this ... with all the electronics that everyone can get these days, wouldn't even a cheap bass be able to imitate something else? 


You might get a similar sound  but then a cheap bass is not going to play as well as a more expensive one. There's a reason why they're more expensive.


Posted By: Davesax1965
Date Posted: March 05 2018 at 06:05
Also I very much doubt you'd get anything like a similar sound, to be honest. You have to introduce so many effects that the sound of the bass disappears and you're just left with the effects. 

Even with modern VST technology, you can't really replace real instruments. You can get an approximation, but a $150 plugin will not come close to, say, a real Moog modular. It gets especially bad when trying to simulate brass or woodwind instruments, I hear so many VST saxes which sound absolutely toe curlingly appalling. Actually, I used to do a lot of sax session work for bands who assumed that a VST sax would sound passable, and then found it didn't. 

As Chopper says, a discount bass will still feel like a discount bass. If you have pickups which ... don't, and the body is made out of an outhouse door, you can't add to what's not there. And it'll play horribly as well. Having said that, starter basses are a lot better quality from the absolute rubbish I started on many, many years ago. 

-------------
MACCLESFIELD ILLUMINATI
https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/


Posted By: Boojieboy
Date Posted: July 16 2018 at 14:05
Anything with a rich, dynamic sound range. Sometimes you can take a blander sounding bass and boost the harmonics (mid-range and treble) to bring out more clarity and sound.

I love Rickenbackers, but they're expensive these days, and have had manufacturing issues in recent years.



Posted By: Davesax1965
Date Posted: July 17 2018 at 09:52
There's a good point above that buying a Rick will not make you automatically sound like Chris Squire. 

Older readers may remember no-hope guitarists buying white Strats by the shed load: for some strange reason, this didn't automatically turn them into Jimi Hendrix. Can't think why. 

Bass is really all about technique. It's easy to play bass badly and get into bad habits: getting a good sound out of a bass is very subtle indeed. You certainly won't get a fantastic sound out of a cheap instrument, but buying an expensive bass doesn't guarantee that you'll sound good, either. 

Also small things like skimping on strings or having a bad setup will destroy your tone. I can just pick a guitar up and tell if someone can play or not judging on how well it's been set up. 

The good news is that there is a huge selection of basses out there all better made than the planks of wood I (and many others) had to start with in the 1980's. Most are better made than "quality instruments" of the 60's and 70's. 

If the question is "what constitutes a "prog" bass" then that depends on a lot of factors, to be honest. 

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MACCLESFIELD ILLUMINATI
https://brotherhoodofthemachine.bandcamp.com/


Posted By: Frenetic Zetetic
Date Posted: July 21 2018 at 19:23
I've always gone with Ibanez, and I've never been let down. My main is an RG550 fretless.

-------------
https://soundcloud.com/frenetic-zetetic/albums" rel="nofollow - Jamshire

Jazz fusion all day, baby.



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