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Children & Prog

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Topic: Children & Prog
Posted By: Epignosis
Subject: Children & Prog
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 20:33
My eldest has always gone to sleep with music.

At first it was a Capella lullabies.  Then it was nursery rhymes and similar songs ("Old MacDonald" and "This Little Piggy").

For a few weeks recently, he's gone to bed with Three Dog Night's greatest hits.

This past week, it's been Foxtrot.

He used to love when I played "Can-Utility and the Coastliners" for him on guitar, but I think he's forgotten it.  There's a video we made of us somewhere "playing" that song together.

Earlier I asked him what his favorite Foxtrot song was.

He said, and I quote, "I like number six, but it's a long song!"

Approve Hug




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http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health



Replies:
Posted By: thellama73
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 20:40
My sister just had a baby. I got her this:
[TUBE]MRuJ82CnEGI[/TUBE]

Raymond Scott needs to be on PA.


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Posted By: geneyesontle
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 21:38
I am a teenager and I wasn't always raised with prog. I used to go to sleep with little lullabys like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. My first experience to prog was Supertramp. I was also raised to Sting before I Got interest to music. Ahhh, childhood memories.

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Poseidon wants to Acquire the Taste of the Fragile Lamb
- Derek Adrian Gabriel Anderson, singer of the band Geneyesontle


Posted By: HarbouringTheSoul
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 21:50
I've been listening to Frank Zappa since the age of four. It has been claimed that this has had quite an effect on me. Wink

Originally posted by Epignosis

This past week, it's been Foxtrot.

Genesis is probably the kind of music that will cause massive waves of nostalgia when you listen to it as an adult after having heard it as a child, so I applaud that. You might want to play him Wind & Wuthering. That seems like an album made for childhood nostalgia.


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 21:54
Originally posted by HarbouringTheSoul

I've been listening to Frank Zappa since the age of four. It has been claimed that this has had quite an effect on me. Wink

Originally posted by Epignosis

This past week, it's been Foxtrot.

Genesis is probably the kind of music that will cause massive waves of nostalgia when you listen to it as an adult after having heard it as a child, so I applaud that. You might want to play him Wind & Wuthering. That seems like an album made for childhood nostalgia.


Not really aiming at nostalgia- our eldest is autistic.

He likes slightly zany music.  I mean, listen to the middle section of "Supper's Ready" and all of "Get 'Em Out by Friday."  It's goofy.

I'm thinking about letting him have Fragile next week if he is comfortable in letting me change CDs.  I think he would get a kick out of "Five Per Cent of Nothing."


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http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: Gallifrey
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 22:59
I got my 9 year old sister to listen to all of Phideaux's "Snowtorch" without being bored. Thought it was a pretty good achievement, since she wants to be a singer but only knows lady gaga.

For the brief prog I was exposed to at a young age, I loved most of it. Songs like Elton John's "Funeral For a Friend" and Deep Purple's "Child In Time" remain top songs to this day. Just something about them going beyond the norm intrigued me. Of course, in those days I thought it was rare haha, and that 8 minutes was a very long time for a song.


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RYM: http://rateyourmusic.com/~Gallifrey


Posted By: Gallifrey
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 23:03
Originally posted by geneyesontle

I am a teenager and I wasn't always raised with prog. I used to go to sleep with little lullabys like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. My first experience to prog was Supertramp. I was also raised to Sting before I Got interest to music. Ahhh, childhood memories.

Supertramp was one of the first for me as well. One of those sort of bands that non-prog fans love without really knowing it's prog. My parents used to play them all the time. I remember acquiring some of my dad's old records a few years ago and being shocked that I knew basically all the lyrics to Breakfast in America, despite it only being played really when I was age 4-6.


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BLOG: https://www.facebook.com/neoprogisbestprog
LAST.FM: http://www.last.fm/user/gallifrey337
RYM: http://rateyourmusic.com/~Gallifrey


Posted By: Progosopher
Date Posted: November 12 2012 at 23:39
Dude, that's awesome!  When I was real little I used to listen to a lot of Disney music.  Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf was my favorite song.  The first record I bought (or rather chose since I was only 6 or 7) was The Markettes Play the Batman Theme and Others.  My first band was The Monkees.  I heard a lot of Three Dog Night on the radio when I was a tween, since they were HUGE in the early 70s, but Foxtrot?  I don't think I was ready for that until I was at least 16.

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The world of sound is certainly capable of infinite variety and, were our sense developed, of infinite extensions. -- George Santayana, "The Sense of Beauty"


Posted By: Sumdeus
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 02:22
I grew up on Pink Floyd. I really wish I was shown more prog as a kid. I had a long metal phase from around 11-16 but if I had just been shown things like King Crimson or Camel when I was 10 years old it would've blown my mind. I remember getting The Doors' Strange Days at the local library as a kid and going home and just listening to it over and over and over again nonstop because I was so captivated by that magic sound.


Posted By: Moogtron III
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 02:49
I grew up with prog.
My brothers were all teenagers / early twens when I was about 6, 7 year old.
I remember that hen I was 4, I was crazy about See Me Feel Touch Me by The Who.
I remember that when I was 7, Air from Ekseption was my favorite song.
My brothers liked Genesis, Yes, ELP, Procol Harum and I was fascinated by it.
Kids should be proggified more and more! LOL
My wife said to me several times that I should play my music to my kid daughter too.
Excellent idea, I must say Clap


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 03:14
My parents used to send me to bed listening to Radio Luxembourg and I'm pretty sure that is the reason why I've been obsessed with music my entire life. My Dad had this theory that if you sent babies to sleep in total silence you were making a rod for your own back so later you'd never get them to sleep if there was any noise in the house. I used that same theory on my own daughter, making a "baby tape" of various pieces of music for her to listen to as she slept (Bowie, Floyd, Siouxsie etc) - at age 7 she "discovered" Courtney Love and all my good intentions were undone. LOL

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If you cannot be wise, pretend to be someone who is wise and then just behave like they would - Neil Gaiman


Posted By: AtomicCrimsonRush
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 03:25
My little girl loves The Snow Goose and my teen is getting into Mostly Autumn and some vintage Genesis. Its all my fault of course!

She likes Nursery Cryme but doesn't understand it.

When I was only 8  I grew up in the 70s and I heard Bungle in the Jungle and Black Night. I know this cos I used to write down songs off the radio and kept the lists!




Posted By: Sumdeus
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 03:29
Originally posted by Dean

at age 7 she "discovered" Courtney Love and all my good intentions were undone. LOL


there's still hope, try to turn her on to Grace Slick or Janis Joplin! :P


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 06:11
One interested thing about our oldest son is that he must have singing.

When "Watchers of the Sky" first began, he became upset, saying, "He forgot to sing!"

But once P.G. began, all was right with the world.

So I probably won't give him The Snow Goose any time soon.


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http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: thellama73
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 07:25
Originally posted by Epignosis

One interested thing about our oldest son is that he must have singing.

When "Watchers of the Sky" first began, he became upset, saying, "He forgot to sing!"

But once P.G. began, all was right with the world.

So I probably won't give him The Snow Goose any time soon.


The first album I ever loved was Bat Out of Hell by Meat Loaf, which I discovered at age 10. The first track has about 3 minutes of instrumental music before the vocals come in, and I remember my ten year old brain being utterly unable to understand how that was possible.

I got the idea of an instrumental, but an entire section without vocals in an otherwise vocal driven song was completely foreign to my experience. By the time you got to three minutes, the song was supposed to be over, not just getting started!

My how things have changed.


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Posted By: HarbouringTheSoul
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 07:30
I know that when I was a small kid, I thought that all songs adhere to a rigid formula: Intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, verse, chorus, outro. I was utterly shocked when a song played on the radio that consisted only of verses. I remember asking my parents: "Where's the chorus? That's not a real song!"


Posted By: thellama73
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 07:38
Originally posted by HarbouringTheSoul

I know that when I was a small kid, I thought that all songs adhere to a rigid formula: Intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, verse, chorus, outro. I was utterly shocked when a song played on the radio that consisted only of verses. I remember asking my parents: "Where's the chorus? That's not a real song!"


Was it a Bob Dylan song? He has lots of those.


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Posted By: Astral Traveller
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 07:41
From age 5 I was interested with prog rock. One of my first albums was Styx's Paradise Theatre. I then listened to The Grand Illusion and Pieces of eight, when one day in my dad's old room at my grandparents house, I found five cassettes that amazed me, Rush's Exit Stage...Left and Moving Pictures and Pink Floyd's The Wall, Dark Side of The Moon, and Wish You Were Here. 

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A mistake is always forgivable, rarely excusable and always unacceptable. -Robert Fripp


Posted By: HolyMoly
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 07:44
My daughter (almost 7 now) used to request I play "Shesmovedon" by Porcupine Tree, and "Ruby is the One" by Earth and Fire.  Nowadays, she's devoted most of her considerable musical interest to the Beatles.  I put their whole catalog on her little mp3 player for her room, and she knows all the songs by heart.  Often on weekends we'll go down to the basement and pull out the vinyl and we'll listen to Beatles records while she reads along on the lyric sheet.  Just like I did when I was a kid. Approve

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My other avatar is a Porsche / http://raregoat.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - RARE GOAT bandcamp page

NEVER forget: the ant can carry eight times its own weight.
Or is it nine?

- Kehlog Albran


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 08:24
Hi,
 
My younger brothers picked up on a lot of the stuff I had ... like Scorpions (1st 3 albums), AD2, and Mike Oldfield, Vangelis and others.
 
The house we had, was fairly educated when it comes to various cultures ... for example, my sisters had travelled in Europe and they had Aphrodite's Child way before their last album, and even had a Demi Roussos album to their credit ... so by the time I heard 666 and loved it, they thought it was not good, because they had the earlier stuff! They also had other things that were fairly progressive ... like Alan Stivell's opus album that went Red Seal and some other odd things here and there.
 
Children .. younger sister's son became a bass player in many bands until he decided that he was too good a musician and others too lazy around him, and he became a dj in the LA area ... apparently has an album already and a fairly good reputation. He plucked on my bass several times ... a Gibson EB-0 at the time.
 
Other than my younger brother, who is a music fiend like me, pretty much the rest of the family is "music'less" for my tastes and I tend to follow the Shakespeare's dictum on this one ... not trust anyone that has no music inside!
 
Odd stuff ... related to this somewhat. I have always had a "tinker bell" ... that I can use for meditation or other things. One of its best uses, has always been on babies that cry ... because their teeth might be hurting as they pop or such ... I get to calm them down. I have had better luck with them by doing "visuals" than music, however ... and is one of the reasons why I have a lot of fun with kids ... sometimes more so than adults ... or as one child once told her mother ... he plays with us, not give us toys! ... which ended a relationship!
 
Mostly music has been ... an adult's mind game in our house ... and I have written the story about my dad listening to Tomita's version of Debussy and him looking at it as fooling around, just like Walter Carlos had ... and I got ticked and trashed him ... and a week later when I visited, my mom told me that he had listened to the album again and that it was really faithful and very well done as an interpretation, unlike the Walter Carlos album that was less serious music than it was fun. So I have him the next Tomita album ... he was now ... "sunthesized"!
 
And we're talking very early ... and this is not something that we discuss a lot ... but he already had Heinemann,  Stockhausen and many others. He did not have Terry Riley, which I gifted him with as a way to show him that what those two were doing was "colder" and more "mechanical" than what Terry was doing ... which he eventually agreed to. By that time, I already had Beaver and Krause in my collection, btw ... which I got because they were involved in a few films and their music was adapted and adjusted in several things.
 
All in all, for us, the "children" did not take to it as much, because our house had that stupid "intelectual" thing ... and never once thought that a child's opinion was as valuable as ours! For all intents and purposes, because of the "famous dad", the "music" and the "art" was taken out of all children and offsprings ... in some cases as a reaction to the over-bearing situation that says that in every house and country, there is only one God, and the children are not important ... they kiss the legacy's bums!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Sagichim
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 09:39
My wife says she's afraid our kids would turn out crazy if I'll keep playing prog in the house.

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"One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain.."


Posted By: dtguitarfan
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 10:57
I don't play my music in the house much. But my wife had this conversation with my daughter Lilly in front of me:
"Lilly, what kind of songs does mommy like?"
"Mommy likes *in a high sing-song voice* pretty songs!"
"What kind of songs does daddy like?"
"Daddy likes *in the deepest voice she can muster* LOUD SONGS!"

I laughed. My son is always asking me to play my loud songs since that conversation.

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http://tinyurl.com/cy43zzh" rel="nofollow - My 2012 List


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 11:05
My 4 year old nephew loves the album DUKE and the song SLEDGEHAMMER. Lol.

Love that he even Dances to it!!!

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Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)


Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 11:33
Originally posted by Epignosis



This past week, it's been Foxtrot.

He used to love when I played "Can-Utility and the Coastliners" for him on guitar, but I think he's forgotten it.  There's a video we made of us somewhere "playing" that song together.

Earlier I asked him what his favorite Foxtrot song was.

He said, and I quote, "I like number six, but it's a long song!"

Approve Hug


This alone makes you an amazing father


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The greatest record label of all time!


Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 11:35
My parents play(ed) a lot of Rush and Yes as I grew up. And because of that, I love all the bands I love now. 

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http://bit.ly/1kqTR8y" rel="nofollow">
The greatest record label of all time!


Posted By: HarbouringTheSoul
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:37
Originally posted by thellama73

Originally posted by HarbouringTheSoul

I know that when I was a small kid, I thought that all songs adhere to a rigid formula: Intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, verse, chorus, outro. I was utterly shocked when a song played on the radio that consisted only of verses. I remember asking my parents: "Where's the chorus? That's not a real song!"


Was it a Bob Dylan song? He has lots of those.

I don't remember what it was, except that it was vaguely 60s-ish, but it wasn't Bob Dylan. Maybe Kinks or Beatles.


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:44
I too grew up on Radio Luxembourg, and especially loved Stuart Henry's contempory rock chart show. It played all the stuff I loved, whilst on Radio One we had good old Tommy Vance with the Friday Rock Show.

My son loved Marillion when we saw them a few months ago. He also has a soft spot for Gabriel. He appreciates good music, but is also listening to crap such as that bloody awful Gangnam Style thing. ah well, he is only 11, but I hope he has been infused with enough decent music to really appreciate it as he gets older.

My son is also autistic, so does tend to analyse quite a lot. Again, I see this as being a virtue as he develops into an adult.


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In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: menawati
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:52
Originally posted by Epignosis


He said, and I quote, "I like number six, but it's a long song!"

I heard Willow Farm as a young kid and it scared me, there's just something dark and slightly worrying about that section. Nightmares of flutterbies coming to get me Pinch


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They flutter behind you your possible pasts,
Some bright-eyed and crazy, some frightened and lost.


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 13:58
As I've mentioned before, I have successfully played Magma's Köhntarkosz at work with something like 25 kids jumping madly about like a tiny Uruk Hai army. Priceless and quite simply something I'll never forgetLOL
A lot of the music you subject children to, also has to do with what you yourself bring into it. Meaning if you jump and dance and bring them into the midst of the beat, they'll most likely get it straight away. If you sit around and wait for them to magically understand what the meaning behind Tales from Topographic Oceans is, you may just be setting yourself up for failure...

Lastly - most kids tend to dig Demon Fuzz:
 [TUBE]vgg3BJU5WKQ&playnext=1&list=PL27F4ADF7BF20FBB5&feature=results_main[/TUBE]


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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”
- Douglas Adams


Posted By: thellama73
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 14:02
I agree that Willow Farm is creepy. It's probably why it's my favorite part of Supper's Ready.

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Posted By: geneyesontle
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 20:30
Originally posted by Gallifrey

Originally posted by geneyesontle

I am a teenager and I wasn't always raised with prog. I used to go to sleep with little lullabys like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. My first experience to prog was Supertramp. I was also raised to Sting before I Got interest to music. Ahhh, childhood memories.

Supertramp was one of the first for me as well. One of those sort of bands that non-prog fans love without really knowing it's prog. My parents used to play them all the time. I remember acquiring some of my dad's old records a few years ago and being shocked that I knew basically all the lyrics to Breakfast in America, despite it only being played really when I was age 4-6.
 
Same story. My parents had Crime of The Century, Even In The Quietest Moments and Breakfast in America and they used to play these CD's, especially BIA. I used to check the booklet without even knowing some of the songs and reading the lyrics without even knowing what it means LOL. They also bought Crisis, What Crisis and ...Famous Last Words when I really discovered Supertramp and we went to see Roger Hodgson. Ahhh good times. When there is a world full of One Direction and Rihanna (c**p), I still trust Supertramp for a listen, along with other good pop artists. I really love them.


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Poseidon wants to Acquire the Taste of the Fragile Lamb
- Derek Adrian Gabriel Anderson, singer of the band Geneyesontle


Posted By: mongofa
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 22:55

I used to listen to Neu!'s "Leb'Wohl" to fall asleep, but I always got jolted awake by the next track, "Hero"



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Posted By: Polymorphia
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 23:13
My parents showed me Yes when I was 11. That was my earliest introduction to symph prog. My dad is a jazz musician and much of the music I heard growing up was either jazz, jazz fusion, or Christian Contemporary (my mom's influence). As far as listening to music to go to sleep, however, I've actually only recently started to do that. I've found that classical music is great in this setting. I usually like something big like Brahms' 3rd, Messiaen's "Peomes pour mi", any of Stravinsky's ballets, Penderecki's Polymorphia, or Takemitsu's Requiem for Strings.


Posted By: Prog_Traveller
Date Posted: November 13 2012 at 23:55
The only prog I sort of remember from my childhood is "The Yes Album." My father had it on vinyl and I remember the album cover(which I thought was spooky as a kid and even more so the back cover). It definitely fit the music although I don't really remember the music that much from that young age.

I didn't really get into prog until I was about 14 or 15 though.


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Posted By: Aquiring the Taste
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 01:11
I grew up listening to my fathers' music , particularly Louis Armstrong.  Tin Pan Alley had established the song structure that dominated popular music which, to my young ears, sounded boring & predictable. Louise showed me that music could be much more exciting.
My younger son, from age 3 would ambush me when I got home from late shift ( around 11.30pm) claiming he couldn't sleep, but would try if I played him Voltures Blood & Smoke On The Water. Today he is a grown man whos collection of music is mostly Prog. & Jazz.


Posted By: martinprog77
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 02:06
Originally posted by sagichim

My wife says she's afraid our kids would turn out crazy if I'll keep playing prog in the house.

LOLLOLLOLLOLLOLmy wife says the same thing. but my 5 years old  daughter seems to like yes and spocks beard  [ she even dances like crazy with ''Thoughts (Part II) '' LOL]


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Nothing can last
there are no second chances.
Never give a day away.
Always live for today.




Posted By: Chris S
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 02:42
My kids have grown up on Mike Oldfield, Van Morrison, Genesis, Floyd, Strawbs, Yes, Talking Heads etc.......I think I might have brainwashed themTongue they aint complaining, however there is some really good new music out there they have introduced me too also

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Music - The Sound Librarian
...As I venture through the slipstream, between the viaducts in your dreams...


Posted By: someone_else
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 10:50
My daughter (17) has no specific liking for prog. She does not even have long time-favourite bands. But she seems to like the Beatles and Muse. But some years ago, Mussorgsky's The Gnome was played and studied during a music lesson at school, which gave me a fair chance to play her Pictures at an Exhibition at the time.
My wife (47) listens mostly to worship music and she has little liking for prog. Fortunately, she showed some appreciation for Big Big Train's The English Electric (Part One).

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Posted By: Jim Garten
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 11:15
Originally posted by smartpatrol

My parents play(ed) a lot of Rush and Yes as I grew up. And because of that, I love all the bands I love now. 


Consider yourself lucky - in 1967/1975 when my parents were in the age range 30-38, and I was between 4 & 12, they had a whole revolution in music going on all around them - think of the albums which were released when my parents were in their prime!

What did I get?

Bad country & western, Frankie Vaughan & Max Bygraves!

My wife and I have no children, but all our cats have been comprehensively raised on good music

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Jon Lord 1941 - 2012


Posted By: Undercover Man
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 12:00
Didn't grow up with prog at all.
Actually before i got into rock and metal, i listened to rap and sh*t like that, i hate most of that now.

Well, atleast my dad listened to some classic stuff like The Beatles and Pink Floyd, but i didn't really like it at first. That's completely changed now.


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Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:12
My son has replaced Foxtrot with Fragile.

Hearing "South Side of the Sky" from the other room right now.


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http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:13
But think about it- the whimsy of "Cans and Brahms" and "Five Per Cent of Nothing" has to be appealing to a child!

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http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: menawati
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:15
But kids need to rebel when they become teens, maybe it's best to feed them dub-step and EDM at a young age so that they say 'hey I'm not listening to your music any more I'm off to jam some King Crimson' when they hit 14.

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They flutter behind you your possible pasts,
Some bright-eyed and crazy, some frightened and lost.


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:19
Originally posted by menawati

But kids need to rebel when they become teens, maybe it's best to feed them dub-step and EDM at a young age so that they say 'hey I'm not listening to your music any more I'm off to jam some King Crimson' when they hit 14.


I never rebelled against my parents' music.  I still listen to country and classic rock.


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http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: Padraic
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:31
I forgot to try to indoctrinate my kids and now they go around singing Starships and Gangnam Style.

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Posted By: Alitare
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:35
My parents are the ones who brought me to loving music as much as I do - even if they didn't realize it as they did so. My father listened to everyone from Metallica to Jethro Tull. He didn't know 'prog' at all at the time, but he liked everything from Alice in Chains to the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

When I was very young I would have these music knowledge competitions with my dad. It was a lot of fun. He introduced me to Crosby, Stills and Nash. My parents didn't know it, directly. They didn't listen to 'prog' or whatever. My mom listens to more popular stuff now and, looking back, she was interested in hearing new pop music. I never rebelled, but I was deathly afraid of liking anything that wasn't 'rock and roll'. If it was rap, hip-hop, country, or even close, I'd refer to my dad about it all. If he said it was cool, it was cool. I didn't think too much about it when I was 13. Now, when I gained access to the internet, I set off on a journey that has been going ever since. At that time I adored Dream Theater and despised Hank Williams. Now I despise Dream Theater and adore Hank Williams. My musical interests dash from one random thing to the next month by month. I don't know if it was mostly my parents mindsets toward music that pushed me (they never seemed to focus on music or talk about it with anybody), but music was playing constantly, sometimes into the drunken hours of morning. One of my earliest memories is in a dark, small room. It must be around three in the morning and the old stereo on the night stand is playing Nirvana's 'Come As You Are'. Maybe I remember it all wrong. 

Now I'm playing all sorts of things for my son. He's memorized the chorus to Bob Dylan's 'Ballad of a Thin Man'. He likes Savatage and songs off the Anthology of American Folk Music. He's only four, so his development is limited to what I play him. I've no earthly clue what he'll be listening to in ten years. 

Gaw, I do gab on about some inane sh*t, sometimes.


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He gave her his town house and his racing horses. Each meal she ate was a dozen courses. She had a million dollars worth of nickels and dimes. She sat around and counted them all a million times.


Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:42
Rob, I can already tell that your kid will grow up with great taste.

-------------
http://bit.ly/1kqTR8y" rel="nofollow">
The greatest record label of all time!


Posted By: thellama73
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:43
Originally posted by Epignosis

Originally posted by menawati

But kids need to rebel when they become teens, maybe it's best to feed them dub-step and EDM at a young age so that they say 'hey I'm not listening to your music any more I'm off to jam some King Crimson' when they hit 14.


I never rebelled against my parents' music.  I still listen to country and classic rock.


I resisted my dad's taste in music for a long time. Now I am coming around to it (although now all he listens to is soft music with female vocals a la Norah Jones and Regina SpektorConfused)

A couple of weeks ago I bought a Harry Nillson album. I must be getting old.


-------------


Posted By: Sumdeus
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 20:45
Yeah one thing I'm really looking forward to when I have a kid is attempting to sculpt the perfect music taste, and of course the frustration I will go through when my child abandons it for indie dubcore or whatever the hell pop music will be by then.


Posted By: geneyesontle
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 21:08
Originally posted by Padraic

I forgot to try to indoctrinate my kids and now they go around singing Starships and Gangnam Style.
 
LOL
 
Heeeeeeey !!! Sexy Lady. Oppan Gangnam Style
That's exactly my reality. Almost every kid in my class loves the music I hate. But Padraic, don't go so mad about that. They will mature and they will be interested in you music someday. Actually, the music video of Gangnam Style is a little guilty pleasure for me. But the music is c**p.


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Poseidon wants to Acquire the Taste of the Fragile Lamb
- Derek Adrian Gabriel Anderson, singer of the band Geneyesontle


Posted By: menawati
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 21:10
Originally posted by Sumdeus

Yeah one thing I'm really looking forward to when I have a kid is attempting to sculpt the perfect music taste

Haha that came across as slightly sinister like treating your kid as an experiment. 
These guys on here with parents who had good musical taste are lucky. There is no way I'm letting my kids experience the rubbish that mine listened to. The 8 year old is into Rush and some space rock and the 6 year old is digging Mozart and Bach. Not a bad start.


-------------
They flutter behind you your possible pasts,
Some bright-eyed and crazy, some frightened and lost.


Posted By: Sumdeus
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 21:15
Haha well I'm just planning to expose my kids to everything that I wish I was exposed to at a young age. Of course I'll let them go their own way and make their own opinions but I will try to get them to be creative and imaginative from a young age.


Posted By: geneyesontle
Date Posted: November 14 2012 at 21:16
Originally posted by Epignosis

My son has replaced Foxtrot with Fragile.

Hearing "South Side of the Sky" from the other room right now.
What is next. Camel's Moonmadness.


-------------
Poseidon wants to Acquire the Taste of the Fragile Lamb
- Derek Adrian Gabriel Anderson, singer of the band Geneyesontle


Posted By: octopus-4
Date Posted: November 15 2012 at 13:05
Whne my eldest daugther was 2 years old she watched the video of High Hopes on TV with a lot of interest and when it finished she started crying because she wanted it again. The day after I spoke to a colleague who had a daughter of the same age and he told me that his daughter has done the same.
 
Since then I started using high hopes to put her to sleep. Now she's a painter and her last painting shows the shadow of a man in a dark-yellow twilight bringing a bell on his shoulder in a country landscape.
 
When I was 4, I've been told, I was used to play Beatles and Animals in the juke-box. It was too early for prog.  


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Curiosity killed a cat, Schroedinger only half.


Posted By: theteaclub_dan
Date Posted: November 15 2012 at 13:32
Does one child know the secret and can say it?


Posted By: Mellotron Storm
Date Posted: November 15 2012 at 13:34
I bet he'd get a kick out of Mother Gong's Fairy Tales. It is so well done and it's very entertaining with samples and of course music. More narration than singing but i wish i had this when my kids were younger.

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"The wind is slowly tearing her apart"
"Sad Rain" ANEKDOTEN


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: November 15 2012 at 14:21
Originally posted by Epignosis

Originally posted by menawati

But kids need to rebel when they become teens, maybe it's best to feed them dub-step and EDM at a young age so that they say 'hey I'm not listening to your music any more I'm off to jam some King Crimson' when they hit 14.


I never rebelled against my parents' music.  I still listen to country and classic rock.

Neither did I. I still listen to, and enjoy, Simon & Garfunkel, John Denver, and classic rock and roll.


-------------


In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: November 15 2012 at 14:22
I haven't rebelled, but I listen to so much music that isn't within my parent's tastes

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http://bit.ly/1kqTR8y" rel="nofollow">
The greatest record label of all time!


Posted By: octopus-4
Date Posted: November 16 2012 at 07:59
Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Epignosis

Originally posted by menawati

But kids need to rebel when they become teens, maybe it's best to feed them dub-step and EDM at a young age so that they say 'hey I'm not listening to your music any more I'm off to jam some King Crimson' when they hit 14.


I never rebelled against my parents' music.  I still listen to country and classic rock.

Neither did I. I still listen to, and enjoy, Simon & Garfunkel, John Denver, and classic rock and roll.
Nice to read, I love Arlo Guthrie and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band Clap


-------------
Curiosity killed a cat, Schroedinger only half.


Posted By: npjnpj
Date Posted: November 16 2012 at 10:13
It would just seem terribly wrong if my son would like the same music I do. Music has always been a form of rebellion, regardless of musical content, and continues to be.

How could I expect him to be into something that is now 30 or 40 years old? He has his own generation's music, although I think that stuff is awful.

After all, when I was his age (19), I wasn't prepared to listen to Elvis Presley or Frank Sinatra. they were history, I liked Deep Purple In Rock and Led Zeppelin. My parents hated it, and that's how it should be.

Music, at a rebellious age is not about music, it's about attitude.

Musical apprciation will probably come later. I now listen to stuff I wouldn't have dreamt ot listening to when I was that age. So will he,hopefully.

If my son liked the music I'm still into after decades, I'd think there was something very wrong somewhere.


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I like the music of any era, regardless of when it was made.


Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: November 16 2012 at 10:30
Originally posted by npjnpj

It would just seem terribly wrong if my son would like the same music I do. Music has always been a form of rebellion, regardless of musical content, and continues to be.
How could I expect him to be into something that is now 30 or 40 years old?
Music, at a rebellious age is not about music, it's about attitude.
Musical apprciation will probably come later. I now listen to stuff I wouldn't have dreamt ot listening to when I was that age. So will he,hopefully.


I strongly disagree with all of this.
I'm able to rebel with music, just no rebel from my parents, rebel from society. My parents are my friends, my allies, I don't want to rebel. They're nice people with good taste.
I grew up listening to old music and still listen to old music.
And I find the music it's self to be more important than attitude.


-------------
http://bit.ly/1kqTR8y" rel="nofollow">
The greatest record label of all time!


Posted By: Stool Man
Date Posted: November 16 2012 at 10:33
I was ten years old when I discovered Pink Floyd.  That was forty years ago, and they're still my faves.

-------------
rotten hound of the burnie crew


Posted By: Polymorphia
Date Posted: November 17 2012 at 11:08
There must be something terribly wrong with me, then, because I am 16 and appreciate music.Wink


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: November 17 2012 at 11:09
Tiny scratch in my Fragile CD, so it gets stuck at "Five Per Cent For Nothing."  Not good with a mildly autistic kid.  LOL

So he's moved on to The Yes Album.


-------------
http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: QuestionableScum
Date Posted: November 17 2012 at 11:17
I am fairly young for a prog fan as I am 24. My dad is a huge prog fan, and I was exposed to Yes, Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, Genesis and King Crimson from a very young age.


I really enjoyed Jethro Tull and Yes as a young child and I grew to like other prog during my adolescent and teen years.

But getting your children into prog can also create an effect where your children get you into newer prog music. For example, I have got my Dad into Porcupine Tree, Riverside, Anathema, Anekdoten and Opeth among others. The last time I went to see Opeth live, I saw them with my Dad. \


Me and my Dad don`t like all the same music as I love Jazz and my dad does not really like it, and I love electronic music while he does not, but we definitely have broadened each others musical horizons.


Posted By: geneyesontle
Date Posted: November 17 2012 at 11:40
Originally posted by Epignosis

Tiny scratch in my Fragile CD, so it gets stuck at "Five Per Cent For Nothing."  Not good with a mildly autistic kid.  LOL

So he's moved on to The Yes Album.
Well, Yours is No Disgrace for the scratch. Wink


-------------
Poseidon wants to Acquire the Taste of the Fragile Lamb
- Derek Adrian Gabriel Anderson, singer of the band Geneyesontle


Posted By: Undercover Man
Date Posted: November 18 2012 at 12:46
Originally posted by npjnpj

It would just seem terribly wrong if my son would like the same music I do. Music has always been a form of rebellion, regardless of musical content, and continues to be.

How could I expect him to be into something that is now 30 or 40 years old? He has his own generation's music, although I think that stuff is awful.

After all, when I was his age (19), I wasn't prepared to listen to Elvis Presley or Frank Sinatra. they were history, I liked Deep Purple In Rock and Led Zeppelin. My parents hated it, and that's how it should be.

Music, at a rebellious age is not about music, it's about attitude.

Musical apprciation will probably come later. I now listen to stuff I wouldn't have dreamt ot listening to when I was that age. So will he,hopefully.

If my son liked the music I'm still into after decades, I'd think there was something very wrong somewhere.
So there's something wrong with teenagers that like old music, and like it for the music and not the attitude?


-------------


Posted By: Undercover Man
Date Posted: November 18 2012 at 12:49
Originally posted by QuestionableScum

I am fairly young for a prog fan as I am 24. My dad is a huge prog fan, and I was exposed to Yes, Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, Genesis and King Crimson from a very young age.


I really enjoyed Jethro Tull and Yes as a young child and I grew to like other prog during my adolescent and teen years.

But getting your children into prog can also create an effect where your children get you into newer prog music. For example, I have got my Dad into Porcupine Tree, Riverside, Anathema, Anekdoten and Opeth among others. The last time I went to see Opeth live, I saw them with my Dad. \


Me and my Dad don`t like all the same music as I love Jazz and my dad does not really like it, and I love electronic music while he does not, but we definitely have broadened each others musical horizons.
24 isn't young, i've seen lots of younger people here, including me, i'm 16.


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Posted By: Gallifrey
Date Posted: November 18 2012 at 12:50
I found prog two years ago, when I was 14, so it's not as if it's all old people. Plenty of my friends like it too, be it more the modern bands rather than 70's symphonic however.

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BLOG: https://www.facebook.com/neoprogisbestprog
LAST.FM: http://www.last.fm/user/gallifrey337
RYM: http://rateyourmusic.com/~Gallifrey


Posted By: Galactic Melt
Date Posted: November 18 2012 at 21:44
I sing my daughter to sleep with parts of "Misplaced Childhood" (Kayleigh and Lavender). She asks me to sing the "Dilly Dilly" part often. I also play both of my kids Biosphere's "Substrata" which puts them in a mellow mood and helps to drift them to sleep as well. Gotta pass on Dad's love of prog to the youngsters! Cool


Posted By: QuestionableScum
Date Posted: November 19 2012 at 16:07
Originally posted by Undercover Man


Originally posted by QuestionableScum

I am fairly young for a prog fan as I am 24. My dad is a huge prog fan, and I was exposed to Yes, Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, Genesis and King Crimson from a very young age.


I really enjoyed Jethro Tull and Yes as a young child and I grew to like other prog during my adolescent and teen years.

But getting your children into prog can also create an effect where your children get you into newer prog music. For example, I have got my Dad into Porcupine Tree, Riverside, Anathema, Anekdoten and Opeth among others. The last time I went to see Opeth live, I saw them with my Dad. \



Me and my Dad don`t like all the same music as I love Jazz and my dad does not really like it, and I love electronic music while he does not, but we definitely have broadened each others musical horizons.

24 isn't young, i've seen lots of younger people here, including me, i'm 16.


I am well aware that there are prog fans on this board that are younger than me. I was just pointing out that I was not a prog fan who was in their 30's, 40s and 50s. Thus I think it is fair to say that I am fairly young for a prog fan, which is what I said in my post.

I am not denying the existence of teenage prog fans, but in my experience I have met very few prog fans who are in their teens or twenties and many more in their forties and fifties. But this could be due to the company I keep.

This also could be a mere semantic issue however, because if someone happens to like Porcupine Tree and Riverside but does not listen to any other prog, I would not consider them a prog fan, even though they like a couple of prog bands. A prog fan would seem to be someone who listens to a signigicant amount of prog music, rather than a couple of bands, and takes an active interest in progressive music in general.


Posted By: octopus-4
Date Posted: November 19 2012 at 16:17
The bad in being 50 is that I can expect to be able to listen to music for a very maximum of 30 years (likely less), 
It's not enough time to listen to everything I would. You have 26 available years more than me.


-------------
Curiosity killed a cat, Schroedinger only half.


Posted By: geneyesontle
Date Posted: November 19 2012 at 16:22
Originally posted by octopus-4

The bad in being 50 is that I can expect to be able to listen to music for a very maximum of 30 years (likely less), 
It's not enough time to listen to everything I would. You have 26 available years more than me.
 
Workout. Cool
You can live 26 more years (unless you have health problems).


-------------
Poseidon wants to Acquire the Taste of the Fragile Lamb
- Derek Adrian Gabriel Anderson, singer of the band Geneyesontle


Posted By: JediJoker7169
Date Posted: November 19 2012 at 23:28
Some of the music to which I fell asleep as a child has become some of my favorite music, and has guided me toward similar music in later life.  A good example is Chiaroscuro by Mike Marshall & Darol Anger (of Montreux fame) or No Blue Thing by Ray Lynch.  I continued to regularly fall asleep to music through my early teens, at which point it seemed the type of music didn't really matter, as long as it was familiar and likable.  I know for certain that I was, at that time, able to fall asleep listening to Disturbed.  For whatever reason, it now seems that the type of music does matter, as I can no longer fall asleep listening to heavier stuff (like Disturbed).  At the same time, albums like Chiaroscuro and No Blue Thing are almost sure to do the trick.

In my mid- to late teens, instead of falling asleep to music, I would listen to music instead of going to sleep.  I guess it was a form of rebellion... Maybe.  This was one of the ways in which I discovered Progressive Rock.  My first classic Genesis album was Foxtrot, and I can recall listening to it for the first time, seated on my bedroom floor.  I discovered Porcupine Tree in the same way through In Absentia.  Magical experiences, to be sure.


-------------
Rock On,
- D.J. "Slick" Jicky Rones



Posted By: Gallifrey
Date Posted: November 19 2012 at 23:31
I remember, just after I found out about prog, I also discovered my friend's dad liked it, and spend ages ripping all his Rush, Genesis, Tool and Dream Theater cds. I actually got him into both Porcupine Tree and Opeth then, as they were the only prog bands I knew well, know when I go over to their house I get sad because he has every single album of both PT and Opeth.

It's hard loving so much music and having no sustainable source of income.


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BLOG: https://www.facebook.com/neoprogisbestprog
LAST.FM: http://www.last.fm/user/gallifrey337
RYM: http://rateyourmusic.com/~Gallifrey


Posted By: Hercules
Date Posted: November 23 2012 at 17:30
Obviously, children were never on my agenda, but my late partner had a son who is now living with me (until he can afford to move out).
 
He loves Marillion, Camel and Muse and some Yes and Rush but hates IQ and Genesis (probably because I adore them). He plays Hysteria and Roundabout as well as some Rush tracks like YYZ regularly and flawlessly on his bass and is actually getting his band to cover some prog tracks at gigs.


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I have many faults. Being wrong is not one of them.


Posted By: 2WeeksInSpain
Date Posted: November 25 2012 at 18:57
my earliest memory of progressive rock music was running around my grandpas shop pretending to be a giant to the sounds of Alucard by Gentle Giant. must have been about 3 years old. good times


Posted By: CCVP
Date Posted: November 25 2012 at 22:21
Originally posted by Epignosis

Tiny scratch in my Fragile CD, so it gets stuck at "Five Per Cent For Nothing."  Not good with a mildly autistic kid.  LOL

So he's moved on to The Yes Album.

The Yes Album is better than Fragile anyway.


-------------


Posted By: Dayvenkirq
Date Posted: November 25 2012 at 23:19
^ Sorry for going off-topic, but: speaking of Fragile. I think "Long Distance Runaround" is a great soundtrack for the fight scene in the first third of your sig. LOL

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"People tell you life is short. ... No, it's not. Life is long. Especially if you make the wrong decisions." - Chris Rock


Posted By: CCVP
Date Posted: November 26 2012 at 09:02
Originally posted by Dayvenkirq

^ Sorry for going off-topic, but: speaking of Fragile. I think "Long Distance Runaround" is a great soundtrack for the fight scene in the first third of your sig. LOL

Don't you think Roundabout would be more fitting? LOL


-------------


Posted By: Fright Pig
Date Posted: November 26 2012 at 09:47
My 3 year old is an enthusiastic Prog listener though only when we are in the car. At certain times, he will suddenly blurt out "Let's listen to Prog", and in goes the ELP.

He has listened to all of the roughs of my upcoming album and isn't shy about letting me know what he thinks. Every time he has panned something, I have changed it.


-------------
~Oink!


Posted By: Tapfret
Date Posted: November 27 2012 at 20:34
Originally posted by thellama73

My sister just had a baby. I got her this:
[TUBE]MRuJ82CnEGI[/TUBE]

Raymond Scott needs to be on PA.


Huge fan of his early jazz stuff, but "Soothing sounds for Baby" is a profound misnomer for his electronic experiments.


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Posted By: HURBRET
Date Posted: November 29 2012 at 19:43
I grew up with a rather eclectic father. My first prog experience was Gentle Giant's 'Acquirring the Taste' when I was 7, and I liked it. But believe it or not, the thing that caused me to realize I loved music was the 80s Doctor Who theme.
 

-------------
"I don't know if I like it, but it's what I meant."
~Ralph Vaughan Williams, on his fourth symphony

"I don't know if it's what I meant, but I like it."
~Me, on basically everything I've created.


Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: November 29 2012 at 21:01
Originally posted by Epignosis

Originally posted by HarbouringTheSoul

I've been listening to Frank Zappa since the age of four. It has been claimed that this has had quite an effect on me. Wink

Originally posted by Epignosis

This past week, it's been Foxtrot.

Genesis is probably the kind of music that will cause massive waves of nostalgia when you listen to it as an adult after having heard it as a child, so I applaud that. You might want to play him Wind & Wuthering. That seems like an album made for childhood nostalgia.


Not really aiming at nostalgia- our eldest is autistic.

He likes slightly zany music.  I mean, listen to the middle section of "Supper's Ready" and all of "Get 'Em Out by Friday."  It's goofy.

I'm thinking about letting him have Fragile next week if he is comfortable in letting me change CDs.  I think he would get a kick out of "Five Per Cent of Nothing."

Thank you for sharing that!  I have friends with autistic spectrum kids, I love 'em all!  Very neat, creative children, they are a gift for all of us to appreciate.


Posted By: pfloyd
Date Posted: November 29 2012 at 23:26
if i ever have a kid, he/she WILL listen to ummagumma and WILL like it, dammit.

-------------
check out my art: http://alex-bennett.cghub.com/images/


Posted By: Dayvenkirq
Date Posted: November 29 2012 at 23:36
^ Easy there, big fella.

-------------
"People tell you life is short. ... No, it's not. Life is long. Especially if you make the wrong decisions." - Chris Rock


Posted By: pfloyd
Date Posted: November 30 2012 at 12:06
sorry, too aggressive? maybe i'll start with Islands by King Crimson instead. Thats a much easier listen. kid love that stuff! Evil Smile

-------------
check out my art: http://alex-bennett.cghub.com/images/


Posted By: octopus-4
Date Posted: November 30 2012 at 13:45
Originally posted by pfloyd

sorry, too aggressive? maybe i'll start with Islands by King Crimson instead. Thats a much easier listen. kid love that stuff! Evil Smile

My 19 daughter is pressing me since days to buy the tickets for ROGER WATERS at the end of July


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Curiosity killed a cat, Schroedinger only half.


Posted By: pfloyd
Date Posted: November 30 2012 at 14:14
if my parents bought me tickets to Rodger Waters, my love for them would triple. coming from a 19 year old myself. 

-------------
check out my art: http://alex-bennett.cghub.com/images/


Posted By: Epignosis
Date Posted: December 03 2012 at 19:57
My son has asked to hear "Gentle Giant" (based on hearing the name of this band only).  And he rejected his mother's Christmas CD for it.  Big smile

So I threw in The Power and the Glory for him.  Cool

After the first track, he said, "Daddy, I'm tired of you being in here with me.  I want to hear them alone."




-------------
http://epignosis.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - Listen to the new Epignosis album for free- it's good for your health


Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: December 03 2012 at 20:02
lol

-------------
http://bit.ly/1kqTR8y" rel="nofollow">
The greatest record label of all time!


Posted By: Dayvenkirq
Date Posted: December 03 2012 at 20:42
^^ That's neat.

-------------
"People tell you life is short. ... No, it's not. Life is long. Especially if you make the wrong decisions." - Chris Rock


Posted By: infocat
Date Posted: December 04 2012 at 00:47
He was probably embarrassed by your dancing around.

-------------
Frank Swarbrick
--
Belief is not Truth.


Posted By: N-sz
Date Posted: December 04 2012 at 00:57
Awww!
I have to admit, their name probably contributed to why I first listened to them too. There's something about that idea of a Gentle Giant that I like.


-------------
http://nickyj.bandcamp.com/" rel="nofollow - My music
Seventy-nine years ago there were three cousins whose names were Rose Marymarsh, Mary Rosemarsh, and Marsh Maryrose.


Posted By: zeqexes
Date Posted: December 04 2012 at 04:34
Originally posted by Epignosis

My son has asked to hear "Gentle Giant" (based on hearing the name of this band only).  And he rejected his mother's Christmas CD for it.  Big smile

So I threw in The Power and the Glory for him.  Cool

After the first track, he said, "Daddy, I'm tired of you being in here with me.  I want to hear them alone."



LOLLOLLOLLOL


-------------


Posted By: Moogtron III
Date Posted: December 04 2012 at 04:36
LOL Wonderful LOL


Posted By: JediJoker7169
Date Posted: December 05 2012 at 22:08
Originally posted by Epignosis

My son has asked to hear "Gentle Giant" (based on hearing the name of this band only).  ... So I threw in The Power and the Glory for him.
If only I had discovered Gentle Giant earlier.  I was already in my late teens when I picked up my first GG album, Octopus.  I think it was the perfect place to start.  I have since fleshed out my collection chronologically in either direction, back to their debut and up to The Power and the Glory.  Interestingly, of all those albums, my least favorite is In A Glass House, which is their highest rated studio album here on PA.  It seems a bit meandering, less focused than their other efforts.  I do quite like The Power and the Glory, but I think I prefer the first four albums to anything that followed.


-------------
Rock On,
- D.J. "Slick" Jicky Rones




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