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How did you find these bands?

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URL: http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=92731
Printed Date: September 16 2014 at 03:15
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Topic: How did you find these bands?
Posted By: dysoriented
Subject: How did you find these bands?
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 11:09
I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.

This absolutely baffled me, because his music, in general is proggy! David Bowie, Queen, Bryan Ferry. So I suppose, what I'm asking here is, how was it marketed back then? I was told "We didn't have the internet back then to discover music, we just made do''. And it made me wonder, how people found out about these bands? As I'm guessing it was just as niche then as it is now.

Does that make sense? LOL

(By the way, I don't just mean those select few, I mean the whole prog scene, obviously there's a ton of bands/musicians that were active at the time)



Replies:
Posted By: Mormegil
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 11:34
I'd have to say (and kudos to the marketing departments), but a lot of the prog bands I followed in the '70s were because of some really striking cover art! It's one of those "the cover's cool so the music must be great!" kind of things.

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Welcome to the middle of the film.


Posted By: HolyMoly
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 11:44
I got into prog in the 80s, not the 70s, but it was still pre-internet.  I discovered a lot of that stuff by way of the Rolling Stone Record Guide.  I read that book from cover to cover several times.  Even that had pretty skimpy coverage of prog, but it was a start.

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My other avatar is a Porsche / http://raregoat.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - RARE GOAT bandcamp page

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Or is it nine?

- Kehlog Albran


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:13
I met the right people but was never happy with the singles chart so never really liked much "popular" music. Although anyone buying the music press would be aware of anothyer world besides the charts. 

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Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: A-JCharron
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:13
For me it was also the 80's and two things: Asia first which introduced me to Yes and Wetton-era King Crimson, then hearing ELP's "Still... You Turn Me On" on the radio. The writing, the layering of the sound (Greg Lake's production) just made me want to hear more from that band. Got a couple of their albums over the next few days, then just went on to the other prog bands.

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Humouring Gods; Where Classic Meets Rock

http://www.ajcharronmusic.com" rel="nofollow - http://www.ajcharronmusic.com
<a href="http://a-jcharron@bandcamp.com"


Posted By: rushfan4
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:14
They came to me in a dream one night.

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Posted By: Larree
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:32
Mostly word of mouth and luck!

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http://larree.ws" rel="nofollow - The Larree (dot) Website


Posted By: friso
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:35
I donwloaded Arena bij excedent, found King Crimson because it was said to 'progressive rock' like Arena en then I found progarchives.


Posted By: MuzikLuva
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:41
For me it was Ummagumma by Pink Floyd.  I saw the album and on the back, all the various instruments laid out.  I had to hear what it sounded like and I was hooked.  Then when I heard Roundabout by Yes on the radio, there was no turning back.


Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:41
Originally posted by dysoriented

I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.

This absolutely baffled me, because his music, in general is proggy! David Bowie, Queen, Bryan Ferry. So I suppose, what I'm asking here is, how was it marketed back then? I was told "We didn't have the internet back then to discover music, we just made do''. And it made me wonder, how people found out about these bands? As I'm guessing it was just as niche then as it is now.

Does that make sense? LOL

(By the way, I don't just mean those select few, I mean the whole prog scene, obviously there's a ton of bands/musicians that were active at the time)

Ha!  Prog was HUGELY popular back then!  Singles by Yes, ELP, Focus, Flash and other bands received as much airplay back then as Justin Bieber does today!   Rock magazines like Circus were full of news about Yes, Genesis etc.  

National tours by prog bands were some of the largest events in rock, filling the largest venues in big cities!  Many records were broken by Yes and ELP.   My first prog concert was Yes CTTE, 22 September, 1972 (with an unknown band called "The Eagles" opening for them!). 

Back then, we had "record stores" and the best ones had many bins of import albums.  That is how I learned about Magma, Amon Duul II and other bands in 1973.  There were also underground radio stations, like the very progressive and hugely popular TRIAD radio in Chicago.  See this page for the history of "freeform radio"

http://wfmu.org/freeform.html" rel="nofollow - http://wfmu.org/freeform.html

I believe prog was even more popular in the UK!  Yes held court at the Marquee Club in London etc.  


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:50
Originally posted by cstack3

Originally posted by dysoriented

I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.

This absolutely baffled me, because his music, in general is proggy! David Bowie, Queen, Bryan Ferry. So I suppose, what I'm asking here is, how was it marketed back then? I was told "We didn't have the internet back then to discover music, we just made do''. And it made me wonder, how people found out about these bands? As I'm guessing it was just as niche then as it is now.

Does that make sense? LOL

(By the way, I don't just mean those select few, I mean the whole prog scene, obviously there's a ton of bands/musicians that were active at the time)

Ha!  Prog was HUGELY popular back then!  Singles by Yes, ELP, Focus, Flash and other bands received as much airplay back then as Justin Bieber does today!   Rock magazines like Circus were full of news about Yes, Genesis etc.  




Not in the UK it wasn't. Most kids never heard of those bands


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Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: Moogtron III
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 12:52
My older brothers found prog for me, and how they found, I don't know.
I did forget a bit about prog in my teenage years, and through a Rock Encyclopedia that I bought, age 20, I discovered Genesis and Traffic. I recognised the old Genesis records from my youth and got into buying them.
A friend of mine who was into countryrock said: you'll probably going to like Yes too. I tried out the old albums and once again it was déjà vu, or better: déjà entendu: I recognised all the albums of my early youth.
A sister of a friend of mine, who was into Bartok, put on an ELP record and I recognised the music from when I was a kid.
So I rediscovered all the prog gems of my youth and became an active prog fan myself.
In 1987 I went to the Genesis' Invisible Touch tour and there I met someone who promoted a prog magazine. I became a subscriber, and from then on, I discovered all the neo prog bands beside Marillion.
From 1994 on, when I discovered the internet, I tried out websites of bands that I knew.
I often went to the Gibraltar Encyclopedia of Progressive Rock (GEPR).
In 2005 I discovered ProgArchives, and I stayed there ever since.


Posted By: Nogbad_The_Bad
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 13:45
I found them through friends who were into similar music, music press (standing in the newsagents reading the paper then putting it back), and hours perusing the aisles in record stores. Happy days.

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Ian

Anyone who thinks Kansas is Prog get out of the room - Adolf Hitler



Posted By: Gerinski
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 14:12
Some Prog bands and albums were as popular as, say, Radiohead or Dream Theater have been in more recent years. For people following a bit what's going on in the music world besides the radio mainstream hits it's not too hard to discover that this music exists. So for example I'm pretty sure that your father knew about DSOTM, Wish You Were Here or Tubular Bells.
Then it's a matter of how much one likes those popular records, those who liked them got to dig a bit further and discovered GG, Crimson or Caravan, but for people who were not particularly attracted by those best known records most of Prog remained obscure and they were happy listening to Bowie, Queen, Lou Reed, Deep Purple etc.

At any rate it was quite popular, if you would go to some party and scrolled through the albums brought by the people, I can tell you that you would surely find some Yes album, Floyd, Camel, ELP, Who etc.


Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 14:34
I did not discover prog until the mid to late 80s, though i had superficially been aware of it when i was young in the seventies. A friend lent me some prog albums in 1985, and then i became, as one friend put it, "the beating heart of the used record stores of my city".
      I bought big names, and also took gambles on very obscure albums. Though the cover of a record is not the most important thing, it was a pretty big factor in what i decided to gamble on.
          My prog listening and awareness just mushroomed from then on.

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 14:35
Originally posted by Snow Dog

Originally posted by cstack3

Originally posted by dysoriented

I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.

This absolutely baffled me, because his music, in general is proggy! David Bowie, Queen, Bryan Ferry. So I suppose, what I'm asking here is, how was it marketed back then? I was told "We didn't have the internet back then to discover music, we just made do''. And it made me wonder, how people found out about these bands? As I'm guessing it was just as niche then as it is now.

Does that make sense? LOL

(By the way, I don't just mean those select few, I mean the whole prog scene, obviously there's a ton of bands/musicians that were active at the time)

Ha!  Prog was HUGELY popular back then!  Singles by Yes, ELP, Focus, Flash and other bands received as much airplay back then as Justin Bieber does today!   Rock magazines like Circus were full of news about Yes, Genesis etc.  




Not in the UK it wasn't. Most kids never heard of those bands

It was a strange situation then. Shows such as Top of the Pops were full of glam, crappy "soul" music from the States, and corny pop.

However, the music press then regarded what we call prog or art rock as the epitome, and shows such as Old Grey Whistle Test catered for serious music fans. When Rick Wakeman appeared on this, aided by a news dispute on BBC1, he became an overnight star.

Bands such as Yes, Led Zep, The Who, Deep Purple et al sold albums by the truckload. Serious bands sold out gigs at large venues.


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In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 14:45
Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Snow Dog

Originally posted by cstack3

Originally posted by dysoriented

I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.

This absolutely baffled me, because his music, in general is proggy! David Bowie, Queen, Bryan Ferry. So I suppose, what I'm asking here is, how was it marketed back then? I was told "We didn't have the internet back then to discover music, we just made do''. And it made me wonder, how people found out about these bands? As I'm guessing it was just as niche then as it is now.

Does that make sense? LOL

(By the way, I don't just mean those select few, I mean the whole prog scene, obviously there's a ton of bands/musicians that were active at the time)

Ha!  Prog was HUGELY popular back then!  Singles by Yes, ELP, Focus, Flash and other bands received as much airplay back then as Justin Bieber does today!   Rock magazines like Circus were full of news about Yes, Genesis etc.  




Not in the UK it wasn't. Most kids never heard of those bands

It was a strange situation then. Shows such as Top of the Pops were full of glam, crappy "soul" music from the States, and corny pop.

However, the music press then regarded what we call prog or art rock as the epitome, and shows such as Old Grey Whistle Test catered for serious music fans. When Rick Wakeman appeared on this, aided by a news dispute on BBC1, he became an overnight star.

Bands such as Yes, Led Zep, The Who, Deep Purple et al sold albums by the truckload. Serious bands sold out gigs at large venues.

I don't deny it. But at school. most of my contempraries  didn't delve into these bands. 


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Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: KingCrInuYasha
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 15:23
King Crimson - My dad had a guitar book that mentioned several guitarists, one of them being Robert Fripp. Not long after that, I was exposed to most of  In The Court Of The Crimson King via AOL Radio.

Gentle Giant - My dad wanted me to listen to Three Friends. I wasn't too interested, but there were some parts I really liked. It wasn't until I delved further into their output that I stared listening to it more often.

Van Der Graaf Generator - I liked the computer game Lemmings and was curious if there was a song titled "Lemmings" - don't know why, I just wanted to. I think these guys were the first to pop up.


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He looks at this world and wants it all... so he strikes, like Thunderball!


Posted By: elbownut
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 15:58

I was fortunate to have some friends who were into prog when I was at school. So a lot of discoveries were from them and word of mouth generally.

As has been mentioned already, in the seventies prog was pretty mainstream and was on radio and TV. I discovered a lot of great stuff listening to the likes of Alan Freeman on Radio 1 and watching The Old Grey Whistle Test on BBC2. What memories !
 


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"Music was my first love and it will be my last" - John Miles "Music"


Posted By: bobthenob
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 15:58
As a veteran of the 70's...in LA no less, we relied on word of mouth, knowledgable record store (member those?) clerks, and publications such as Melody Maker, Creem, Rolling Stone, and of course the fun, but often unreliable method of choosing cool album covers.


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 16:03
Originally posted by elbownut

I was fortunate to have some friends who were into prog when I was at school. So a lot of discoveries were from them and word of mouth generally.

As has been mentioned already, in the seventies prog was pretty mainstream and was on radio and TV. I discovered a lot of great stuff listening to the likes of Alan Freeman on Radio 1 and watching The Old Grey Whistle Test on BBC2. What memories !
 
Mainstream?

Alan freeman show, 2 or 3 hours every saturday, OGWT half an hour every week  late at night..when it was on.


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Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 16:07
Some prog was played on the radio and I remember at school the music library was well stocked with ELP, Yes and King Crimson albums. I even remember someone polling kids at school to find out their favourite bands and the prog bands came out on top. This was in Swindon ( a benchmark for English averageness not some strange place) and it was around about 1977. BBC Radio wise Alan 'Fluff' Freeman was a big deal on a Saturday afternoon. I also discovered Radio Luxembourg and Radio Caroline who seemed to play a lot of prog stuff. I don't believe it was that underground at the time although by the early eighties it was being wiped off the face of planet it seemed. BUT then came IQ,Marillion and the rest.


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 16:13
Oh well  I am obviously barking mad. I never heard Prog on mainstream radio. What else can I say? Just explaing why it is not unusual for his dad not to have heard of those bands.

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Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: akamaisondufromage
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 16:39

I suppose when I first started listening to prog there was very little on the radio as it was 76/77 ish and guess what was pushing its way into the world.  I know I used to listen to Alan Freeman on Sat but I don't remember what he used to play (except I was quite surprised once when he played something by Joy Division and that may have been the first time I heard them.  At the same time I would listen to John Peel (so pretty well no prog there).

So basically any other prog I heard from friends and friends of friends.  Who found out about it from older friends and brothers and sisters and their friends.  Borrowing records!! You don't have to do that now.  And by reading the music papers.  I remember reading about what is called neoprog round these parts in Sounds and the Melody Maker and then trotting off to see Marillion just on the basis of  a gig review.  You just had to find out for yourself with no interenet or nothing

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Help me I'm falling!


Posted By: Dayvenkirq
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 17:06
http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=92384&KW=" rel="nofollow - Similar thread.  Boom.
http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=71420&KW=how+did+you" rel="nofollow - Kind of similar thread. Boom.
http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=70394&KW=how+did+you" rel="nofollow - The poll version of it. Boom.

Now that I look at all that, I can't help but chuckle.


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"People tell you life is short. ... No, it's not. Life is long. Especially if you make the wrong decisions." - Chris Rock


Posted By: akamaisondufromage
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 17:14
^ Easily amused? 
 
Anyway I think they are distinct to this. Not that I care.


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Help me I'm falling!


Posted By: dysoriented
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 17:56
I don't think I've ever seen Old Grey Whistle Test, only heard tales of it lol. Didn't even know there was a prog show on the radio!
A couple of you said you went by album covers, I do that, it's not the best way to go. Anyone name an album they bought at the time completely unknowing of the band, just based on the cover?
Was it any good?


Posted By: Dayvenkirq
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 17:59
Originally posted by dysoriented

I don't think I've ever seen Old Grey Whistle Test, only heard tales of it lol. Didn't even know there was a prog show on the radio!
A couple of you said you went by album covers, I do that, it's not the best way to go. Anyone name an album they bought at the time completely unknowing of the band, just based on the cover? Was it any good?

I presume you want to go even further than that, right? Casual findings? Wink



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"People tell you life is short. ... No, it's not. Life is long. Especially if you make the wrong decisions." - Chris Rock


Posted By: ProgBob
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 18:40
Originally posted by Snow Dog

Oh well  I am obviously barking mad. I never heard Prog on mainstream radio. What else can I say? Just explaing why it is not unusual for his dad not to have heard of those bands.


I only really became aware of rock music around 1979 and, even though we were well into the punk/new wave era by then, there was still a reasonable amount of prog on mainstream media.  I remember seeing a Mike Oldfield concert (Exposed tour) and a Genesis show (round about the time of Duke), both on BBC2.  There were various singles in the charts (Genesis, Rush, Peter Gabriel). There was The Wall. I remember seeing a massive window display for Drama in one of the local record shops. The Friday Rock Show on Radio 1, although mainly heavy metal by then, did feature some prog.  On it, I heard archive sessions of Caravan and VDGG. I also heard And You and I which was what inspired me to buy my first Yes album.  Certainly progressive rock (as it was called then) was unfashionable and on the wane and it's true that I was in a minority amongst my peers, but I wasn't alone in being interested in this stuff, and digging into early 70s back catalogues etc. My recollection is that even those who didn't like it had heard of most of the major bands.


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Bob


Posted By: 2112R
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 18:57
Only by the grace of God I was able to plug into the Prog world. When I started high school years ago I remember listening to Tom Sawyer with my dad in the car and thinking... Yeah, this is pretty good. It wouldn't be until I walked into my ninth grade history teacher's class on that awkward first day of high school I would venture into Prog. I remember walking in and hearing this devil singing, heavy back beat, vicious guitar sound (I would later learn it was Opeth's Ghost Reveries) and thinking, "What is this?" My teacher really expanded my taste and view after we hit it off talking about Rush. Ever since that fateful day I've been growing and and expanding into the Prog community. If it hadn't been for high school, I don't think I would have stumbled too far into Prog.

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"All (the naked man) means is the abstract man against the masses. The red star symbolizes any collectivist mentality." - Neil Peart


Posted By: Manuel
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 19:14
Originally posted by Mormegil

I'd have to say (and kudos to the marketing departments), but a lot of the prog bands I followed in the '70s were because of some really striking cover art! It's one of those "the cover's cool so the music must be great!" kind of things.

This was my first thought when I read this thread, but I must say that a lot of my friends who shared the same taste, at least back then, hear some song on the radio, like "From the beginning", "Living in the Past", and others from prog bands that became popular and were played on the radio. After buying the albums, we all discovered a new world of music, and at least for me, has remained my favorite to this day.


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 19:48
Originally posted by cstack3

Originally posted by dysoriented

I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.

This absolutely baffled me, because his music, in general is proggy! David Bowie, Queen, Bryan Ferry. So I suppose, what I'm asking here is, how was it marketed back then? I was told "We didn't have the internet back then to discover music, we just made do''. And it made me wonder, how people found out about these bands? As I'm guessing it was just as niche then as it is now.

Does that make sense? LOL

(By the way, I don't just mean those select few, I mean the whole prog scene, obviously there's a ton of bands/musicians that were active at the time)

Ha!  Prog was HUGELY popular back then!  Singles by Yes, ELP, Focus, Flash and other bands received as much airplay back then as Justin Bieber does today!   Rock magazines like Circus were full of news about Yes, Genesis etc.  

National tours by prog bands were some of the largest events in rock, filling the largest venues in big cities!  Many records were broken by Yes and ELP.   My first prog concert was Yes CTTE, 22 September, 1972 (with an unknown band called "The Eagles" opening for them!). 

Back then, we had "record stores" and the best ones had many bins of import albums.  That is how I learned about Magma, Amon Duul II and other bands in 1973.  There were also underground radio stations, like the very progressive and hugely popular TRIAD radio in Chicago.  See this page for the history of "freeform radio"

http://wfmu.org/freeform.html" rel="nofollow - http://wfmu.org/freeform.html

I believe prog was even more popular in the UK!  Yes held court at the Marquee Club in London etc.  
 
Exactly......I was from northwest Indiana and went to college at IU and many people were already into prog and 'weirder' sounds in 1969. There were local record shops and bins that specialized in imports and prog, etc.And some of the Chicago stations played more prog at night in themed shows. I had many friends who were more into classic rock or country rock or jazz but there were many who had records from all the genres. You might go to a party and here Zep, Sabbath, The Beatles, The Byrds,   Yes, Elp...or whatever. But not that many were into the more 'obscure bands' like Nektar or VDGG....but they were around.


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Et In Arcadia Ego


Posted By: Hercules
Date Posted: March 27 2013 at 19:52
I went up to Cambridge in 1968 and the place was awash with early prog. Sid Barrett came from there, as did Dave Gilmour, so Floyd were well known and popular though I'd never heard of them when I went. The folk scene in Cambridge introduced us to prog folk bands like Fairport and Steeleye. We visited each other's rooms to listen, browsed through each other's record collections, borrowed and lent and sampled. I also tried to start a prog band, but I was too slow to learn (I blame the fact that I had to work for my exams) and they soon replaced me with someone who could actually play bass in time and in tune.
 
After graduating, I went to Imperial College and started a PhD (Brian May was apparently in the same department but left to work full time with Queen before I got to know him) and London was absolutely awash with prog. I saw almost every major band then active including Floyd, Purple, Heep, Caravan, Focus, Tull, ELP, Yes, BJH and many more - except Genesis and Strawbs, which I regret deeply since I've never seen either live and I love them both.
 
I left the country for Canada, which was almost prog free, but when I came back to do post doc at St Andrews I met people who doted on bands like Camel, Druid, Gryphon and Horslips and soon I did too. I also saw Rush in Glasgow, a band I'd missed in Canada (though they weren't really prog then). It was there I fell in love with Alan Freeman's show and I recorded a huge archive of material, but sadly a jealous ex-partner threw it away as an act of revenge - b*****d. Noel Edmonds also used to play a lot of prog on his morning show. Melody Maker, Sounds and NME also covered prog extensively.
 
In short, if you were at university in the late 60s/70s, prog was everywhere. You couldn't NOT hear it. It was one of the best selling genres (think of Floyd and Mike Oldfield who were in the charts for years at a time) and many bands made it on to mainstream television like Top of the Pops. And there was the OGWT which was compulsory viewing.
 
Things might have been very different outside the university environment, though.


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I have many faults. Being wrong is not one of them.


Posted By: HackettFan
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 00:19
Originally posted by HolyMoly

I got into prog in the 80s, not the 70s, but it was still pre-internet.  I discovered a lot of that stuff by way of the Rolling Stone Record Guide.  I read that book from cover to cover several times.  Even that had pretty skimpy coverage of prog, but it was a start.

Yeah, the 80s for me too. I also frequented the Rolling Stone Record Guide, trying to find out more about Genesis at first, and then looking for bands I might like similarly. I never bought the book, just stood there at the bookstore going through it. I had at least a good handful of friends who liked progressive rock too. Buffalo, NY was good for that even in the 80s. There were a couple used record stores in the area too that were chock full of old progressive rock albums.


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 02:32
Originally posted by Snow Dog

Oh well  I am obviously barking mad. I never heard Prog on mainstream radio. What else can I say? Just explaing why it is not unusual for his dad not to have heard of those bands.

IN most cases it wasn't the great long tracks that were played. For instance I can remember DLT playing Hoedown and that would have been about 1976. I had never heard ELP before that.

Also John Peel I recollect did play some prog.I used to listen to his show a lot when I was 15. There were also the odd event type radio programmes that looked at the history of rock music.Prog was always there or thereabouts.1978 to about 1981 it probably more or less disappeared although it was about 1981 that I discovered I could get Radio Caroline. There were at least 3 DJ's on that station that were prog fans! It wasn't just the well known stuff either.. Of course there was also the Friday Rock show. Might only have been 2 hours a week but it was massively important.




Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 04:42
I got seriously into prog in the late '70's, you know that time when punk had supposedly killed prog.  Personally the most grievous wound prog suffered was commercialitis.   However, a lot of the big names in '70's prog did manage to get a song or two played on the radio.  Interesting music was occasionally the stuff of hits.  There were of course magazines and record stores and musicians who changed bands.  The latter was great stuff for discovery through connections.  For example, if you liked Yes and King Crimson,  Jon Anderson had a cameo in KC and Bill Bruford jumped ship (before my prog time).  You can't underestimate the power of word of mouth.  My circle of friends and relatives that liked prog reveled in discovery so when we'd get together and enjoy music there was a lot of hey look what I found going on.  The internet has been a great help in keeping prog alive and vital.  Too many new artists I have discovered thanks to PA and before that, AOL had progressive as one of their streaming "radio" stations.


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Posted By: Ethos
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 07:57
For me it was a slow process.  Radio played very little prog, just the short under 5 minute songs.  Most of mainstream were into top 40 stuff back then (some things never change).  I, like many people, found the Beatles in the 60's, then ELO because they were different and had strings.  My neighborhood friends were hugely influential because they introduced me to Genesis, Tull, Roxy Music, ELP, Yes.  Genesis was the real hook for me.   It was not called "Prog" back then!  I don't recall hearing the term progressive until later on.  Not much if any prog talk at school as I recall.  It has always been fringe music.

One thing that was cool back then was finding hole in the wall record stores that usually had drug paraphernalia behind the counter, on shelves or behind the glass, bongs, pipes, etc. and perusing through the bootlegs bin.  I still have many of those old bootlegs on vinyl, but they were abused for reasons I don't care to discuss right now.
They had interesting names like "Bedside Yellow Foam"  and "Awed Man Out"

Going to concerts and talking to record store personnel was my internet back then.  Talk to strangers at prog. concerts!  They are your brothers in music.  Even today I learn about many groups through word of mouth.  I learned about King Crimson, Camel, Ethos, Van Der Graff Generator, Heldon, Dixie Dregs, Tangerine Dream, through word of mouth at concerts.  I learned about Gentle Giant because they were on the bill with Yes.  What an amazing group that was to see live.  They all played multiple instruments.  Truly one of the most talented groups I have ever seen.  They were captivating.

I had never been exposed to Canterbury Scene back then, strangely enough.  The world was a lot larger then.

There has never been a better time for music than now.  Enjoy it!  You will look back fondly on this time period!Big smile


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"As sure as Eggs is Eggs."


Posted By: Gog/Magog
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 08:15
Early 1980s heard Duchess by Genesis on the radio, thought nice song think I'll investigate this (had very little interest in the music I was exposed to at the time). Bought Duke, great album, must buy more by this band.

Purchased Wind and Wuthering listened, thought what the hell is this? Listened a bit more hooked, bought Nursery Cryme, blimey this is a bit too weird, listened a bit more, again hooked.

Discovered other great bands, found Van der Graaf were perhaps what I had been looking for all my life.

Then lost interest in the mid-1980s and listened to a lot of 80s indie music (I was young and impressionable what can i say). 

Lost interest in that when the whole scene dissolved into nothing in particular, went back to prog and have never loved it more than I do today.


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Some swear they see me weeping in the poppy fields of France


Posted By: TODDLER
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 08:28
Discovered Prog in the early 70's through my cousin (if memory serves), and then it was defined as "Art Rock' by teenagers. Many of the early underground European Prog bands which toured America were billed as opening acts for famous "Rock Stars" and that was the basic marketing concept at the time. PFM opening for Rory Gallagher or King Crimson opening for Humble PIE. That marketing concept drew a wide variety of fans who were interested in mainstream music. Extremely different than the world of Prog today or even much different from 1979 through the 80's where artists like Bill Bruford and National Health played small theatres in Philadelphia and N.Y. After Yes became internationally known, GRYPHON were on tour with them which was yet another different choice/way of doing things. It was a rarity for a "Hard Rock" band like STRAY DOG to be opening for ELP. Things were changing for the better and then it grew progressively worse in the late 70's regarding bookings.
 
When Bruford departed YES, fans took it to heart. Many fans turned up to the K.C. shows screaming Burford's name all night. That is evident on the live recordings of K.C. All Hell broke loose at J.F.K. stadium when YES played "RITUAL". The seats were set on fire and it started to spread rapidly as fire's often do. covering almost half of the entire stadium while Patrick Moraz continued to play his schizoid keyboard sounds at the closing of the piece. This is around the specific point in Prog history when Prog bands were actually playing stadiums just as the mainstream "Rock acts" were doing the same. Prog was actually part of the "Stadium Rock" time period. It is hilarious to think that at 1 time ELP headlined California Jam over Deep Purple who sold more for Warner Brothers than any act to date and within a 3 year period. Prog was in it's glory then. Triumvirat were being promoted as well and it truly puts things into perspective for me now. A very strange time to live through!


Posted By: silverpot
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 10:42
In Sweden radio didn't play much popular music at all in the 60s so we got used to listening to Radio Luxenburg. And then there were the record stores. Without them it would've been pretty difficult to hear anything outside of the charts.
 


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 12:37
Originally posted by Snow Dog

Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Snow Dog

Originally posted by cstack3

Originally posted by dysoriented

I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.

This absolutely baffled me, because his music, in general is proggy! David Bowie, Queen, Bryan Ferry. So I suppose, what I'm asking here is, how was it marketed back then? I was told "We didn't have the internet back then to discover music, we just made do''. And it made me wonder, how people found out about these bands? As I'm guessing it was just as niche then as it is now.

Does that make sense? LOL

(By the way, I don't just mean those select few, I mean the whole prog scene, obviously there's a ton of bands/musicians that were active at the time)

Ha!  Prog was HUGELY popular back then!  Singles by Yes, ELP, Focus, Flash and other bands received as much airplay back then as Justin Bieber does today!   Rock magazines like Circus were full of news about Yes, Genesis etc.  




Not in the UK it wasn't. Most kids never heard of those bands

It was a strange situation then. Shows such as Top of the Pops were full of glam, crappy "soul" music from the States, and corny pop.

However, the music press then regarded what we call prog or art rock as the epitome, and shows such as Old Grey Whistle Test catered for serious music fans. When Rick Wakeman appeared on this, aided by a news dispute on BBC1, he became an overnight star.

Bands such as Yes, Led Zep, The Who, Deep Purple et al sold albums by the truckload. Serious bands sold out gigs at large venues.

I don't deny it. But at school. most of my contempraries  didn't delve into these bands. 
That's because you were too young. Back in those days three years made a huge difference in the friends you associated with and the music you got to listen to - I would never have shared my taste in music with someone three years younger than me or three years older: "And my brother back at home with his Beatles and his Stones, we never got it off on that revolution stuff". My generation lived Prog Rock - seriously; the school playground would be groups of kids swapping albums and talking music - everything from TONTO and White Noise, through Zappa and Beefheart, to Genesis, Yes and Floyd and out the otherside to Van der Graaf Generator, King Crimson and Gentle Giant - there were kids into Hawkwind and Gong; other's into Hatfield and Caravan; then the European music stated arriving - like Can, Faust, Focus, PFM, Le Orme, Tangerine Dream, Amon Duul, Kraftwerke. Everyone of those bands I heard while at school from other kids in the playgound, in the common room and more importantly, on the 40 minute bus ride home. It is hard to describe and hard to imagine just how popular all this stuff was between 1970 and 1974. I guess a close parallel would be the arrival of New Wave a few years later - it carried that kind of excitement and that level of interest.
 
 
 
PS: every schoolboy my age knew Flash because of the flash of knickers on the cover. Embarrassed


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If you cannot be wise, pretend to be someone who is wise and then just behave like they would - Neil Gaiman


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 13:26
Between 1970 and 1975 the radio wasn't wall-to-wall Prog but there was a lot of it on evening shows, just as daytime Radio One is crap and evening Radio One has all the music interesting to today's modern teens. It wasn't just "Fluff" Freeman (though even by 1977 he was becoming a parody of himself), before Peel turned traitor he was a supporter of Prog and was responsible for first playing Tubular Bells on the radio when no one had heard of it. With Peel, Pete Drummond, Alan Black, Annie Nightingale (another Prog traitor), Tommy Vance and Bob Harris (who also produced albums by Prog bands Druid and Wally) all played Prog on their evening programmes - Kid Jensen, Emperor Rosco, Stuart Henry, Johnnie Walker, Paul Gambaccini were also known to play a bit of Prog now and then.
 
IMO, after Ricahrd Williams stopped presenting OGWT it started playing far too much Southern Rock and not enough Prog, once that Prog-traitor Nightingale took over it was all down-hill.
 
 
 
ps: As well as playing the whole of Tubular Bells on his programme, Peel was also supposed to play Hergest Ridge in its entirity on the day of its release, but because Branson took out a full page advert in the music press to advertise this the BBC suits stopped him playing it .. Peel being Peel, played it the day before instead to get around the ban. He also played the whole of Tangerine Dream's Ricochet album a week before it was released, Branson took out a double-page ad after the event (bizzarre - if you can find a copy - it shows a cartoon of giant versions of Froese, Bauman and Franke smashing through a wall).
 
edit 2: found it:


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If you cannot be wise, pretend to be someone who is wise and then just behave like they would - Neil Gaiman


Posted By: cstack3
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 19:59
Originally posted by lazland

 
It was a strange situation then. Shows such as Top of the Pops were full of glam, crappy "soul" music from the States, and corny pop.

However, the music press then regarded what we call prog or art rock as the epitome, and shows such as Old Grey Whistle Test catered for serious music fans. When Rick Wakeman appeared on this, aided by a news dispute on BBC1, he became an overnight star.

Bands such as Yes, Led Zep, The Who, Deep Purple et al sold albums by the truckload. Serious bands sold out gigs at large venues.

I wish I were over there then!  I lived in Devon, briefly, in 1994-95.  The band "Oasis" was hugely popular, and try as I might, I couldn't find much prog to whet the whistle!    

I'll be back, someday!  Cheers!



Posted By: axeman
Date Posted: March 28 2013 at 21:04
For me, the trick wasn't finding the prog bands on the 70s. As somebody mentioned earlier they put out singles and then again Album-oriented Radio--before the record companies reined it in--made it easier to find the more interesting bands--until bands started not being interested in being interesting--outside of a look or perhaps even interesting textures to their pop instruments. 

The trick was the revelation that prog was out there again in the 90s, that the Long Prog Draught was at an end. Spock's Beard released The Light in 1992 and it took me until 1999, when streaming radio started to pull up a site called "ProgRock Radio" and tuned in to hear Escape by The Rocket Scientists, followed up by something from Jadis and Spock's Beard.

Thanks to the internet, I no longer get the scrunched face suggesting the absurd notion that the guy who known for Games without Frontiers or Shock the Monkey used to sing lead--instead of the guy who sang Against All Odds--for the band that was no famous for Invisible Touch and other top-40 dreck. Almost everybody now knows Peter Gabriel used to front Genesis. 

(On a totally different note, I'm listening to Weidorje on my Birds and Buildings IHeartRadio station--does anybody else think they sound identical to Magma?)


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-John


Posted By: progmatic
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 14:26
In the earkt 70s a friend traded me King Crimson's COTCK for Led Zeppelin I.
I was hooked on prog, but didn't have a clue how to find it.
So I searched for albums that had:
1. Awesome cover art
2. Four or less songs per side
3. Musicians who played multiple instruments: guitar, 12-string, double-necked electric, Moogs, ARP string synthesizers, mellotrons, etc.
4. Little to no publicity.
When I went to college I fortunately was fairly good at pool and other (rich) students were not. So I used to take my winnings to a little long-gone record shop in Lakeland Florida called Spec records and start at "A" looking for albums meeting the above criteria. The first week I discovered Camel and Caravan on the same day. Found Genesis, Hawkwind, PFM, Passport and lots others the same way.




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PROGMATIC


Posted By: HemispheresOfXanadu
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 14:32
The radio, this website, friends, my bass teacher, my parents, and YouTube recommendations are how I find bands.


Posted By: Windhawk
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 15:54
Originally posted by dysoriented

Anyone name an album they bought at the time completely unknowing of the band, just based on the cover?
Was it any good?


As I had my formative years a bit later, I can't vouch for those who started their music interest in the 70's. But as someone who started listening to music a lot in the early 80's, I can most certainly vouch for the sales pitch of a good album cover.

Hawkwind - Choose Your Masques
Rush - Moving Pictures
Camel - Mirage

...a few examples of albums I bought where I didn't know anything about the bands at all when I bought the albums, the combination of cover art and song titles that enticed me into a purchase.


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The Progressive Rock record labels project: http://www.progarchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=85100


Posted By: Stool Man
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 15:57
In the 70s, my dad had most of the early Pink Floyd albums (for some reason he didn't bother with the soundtrack albums). Then at school there was a longhaired guy who brought in Jethro Tull & Deep Purple, after that I found things through the music papers

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rotten hound of the burnie crew


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 15:58
^^I've done that a lot of times and I can't even remember being let down.

This one I bought in Sweden when I was 15:

One of my favourite psych albums, even if I didn't "get it" the first time around.


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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”
- Douglas Adams


Posted By: Evolver
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 16:00
I the early 70's I was introduced to some bands via friends and acquaintances.  Some I heard on the radio.  By the mid-70s I was exploring a number of used record shops, and listening to college radio.

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Trust me. I know what I'm doing.


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 16:08
Pink Floyd actually found me now that I think of it. 
I was 9 sitting beside a tennis court, and then one of my friends suddenly decides to whack a couple of headphones on my skull, and says "here listen to this, it's incredible". It was the solo of Comfortably Numb, and I honestly haven't looked back since.


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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”
- Douglas Adams


Posted By: Prog_Traveller
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 20:58
I'm curious as to how old your dad is. Age has something to do with it but also word of mouth. Maybe your dad didn't have any friends into prog or maybe your dad had no friends period. Back in the day I think it was heard on college radio. It was easier to find out about those bands in general and even outside of college radio a lot rock stations had late night prog shows. At some point probably in the late seventies and early eighties prog became very underground and eventually it became so underground that you didn't hear anything about it unless you went out of your way looking for it. This continued well into the nineties. The internet itself didn't save prog. What has helped a lot in the past ten years or so has been the growing number of prog fans and the growing network especially things like facebook(which I'm not on). I personally found out about some of these older bands through magazines and rock encyclopedias(this was in the 80's before the internet).

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Posted By: Progosopher
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 23:05
Like many of my age, it was a matter of being familiar with popular prog bands like Yes, ELP, Tull, Pink Floyd, etc. from the radio and hearing about related bands through word of mouth, concerts, music mags & rags.  Artists going solo, such as Hackett and Gabriel.  Cover art conveyed a certain sensability but was not reliable.  For example, I much prefer Roger Dean's covers for Greenslade over his work for Yes, but I never got into the band.  I did buy an occasional album for the cover, which worked out in an acceptable manner as often as not.   Record store employees were also a good source when they found out what you liked, or even if they had similar tastes.  Sometimes they would play something specifically to get your attention and compel to buy, just like that one scene from Hi Fidelity.  Used record stores would usually let you listen to an album just as most of them will now let you listen to a CD.  There were also specialized magazines and newsletters for specific styles as well as fan clubs.  In a phrase, we had lots of resources back in the so-called day which worked quite well.

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The world of sound is certainly capable of infinite variety and, were our sense developed, of infinite extensions. -- George Santayana, "The Sense of Beauty"


Posted By: bobthenob
Date Posted: March 29 2013 at 23:27
Yes, contrary to conventional wisdom, we did have means of gaining info before bits & bytes


Posted By: tdfloyd
Date Posted: March 30 2013 at 00:21
Dark Side of the Moon was my intro, from my brother.  King Crimson was on the radio with the title track from the first album.  My intro to Genesis was, FYFM.  Don't throw stuff at me ;).  Really liked the song so I bought the album.  Actually bought it 3 times thinking it was a defective album creating the bad production.  Loved the album and worked my way backwards.  ELP and Yes from junior high.  These two and southern rock was all I heard at school. My intro to Tangerine Dream was when I asked a friend for anything like Pink Floyd without the words.  He gave me Thief.  I was hooked with better stuff to come.  Caravan and Camel were from reading magazines and books.

But I can't remember what I ate for breakfast.


Posted By: tdfloyd
Date Posted: March 30 2013 at 00:34
Originally posted by axeman

For me, the trick wasn't finding the prog bands on the 70s. As somebody mentioned earlier they put out singles and then again Album-oriented Radio--before the record companies reined it in

Can still remember Pink Floyd's Echoes and King Crimson's ItCotCK being played on the radio.  Totally floored at what I had heard


Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: March 30 2013 at 01:38

The year 1985 saw me on a vacation to Bali (which extended to many other Indonesian islands over the years.....), I bought PF's 'The Wall' and fell in love with it.  I was 13.  I eventually got around to a video at the local video shop entitled 'Live At Pompeii' (which, having no clue, I thought was 'The Wall' performed live Confused).  Anyway, I fell in love with what I heard.

Around 1987, I discovered (pot Wink)  a book in the school library called 'The Encyclopedia Of Rock'.  I nicked that book (I still have it but pretty shabby).
I started hanging out at the 2nd-Hand record shop not far from home at the time (my older sister knew of this shop) - the guy behind the counter (in his mid-20's) turned out to be a fully-fledged Prog-Guru - Doug.  I just asked him for bands that play long songs, and discovered Caravan, Nektar, Amon Duul II, Bo Hansson etc.  I visited that shop almost on a weekly basis for the next 15 years, amassing many awesome Prog records.  Doug has now been head-honcho of that shop for the last few years, and when I'm in town, I always drop in. 
2005 was my discovery of this sacred site called Prog Archives - need I say more ???


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: March 31 2013 at 02:28
Seems denmark was more or less like UK must have been, crap on the daytime radio, but quite a bit of Prog in TV and on nighttime radio, but still if we talk outside the prog elite stuff, yopu had to know someone how told you about it.
Musicians move too, you could discover Fripp from listning to Gabriel or Bowie.
I have found a lot of music by checking who was on the albums, back when no WWW.
I also had a book about rock, made by a journalist from Danish Radio (Jan Sneum - hats off), had all the Prog Acts there, and you could read what they had done and with whom.
 
 
 
For those of you who understand Scandinavian here is one of Serums shows (he is still on DR)
Its a one hour show, about Krautrock, in relation to HOLGER CZUKAY's 75 years birthsday
http://www.dr.dk/P6Beat/programmer/sneums-garage/2013/03/24/sneums-garage#!/" rel="nofollow - http://www.dr.dk/P6Beat/programmer/sneums-garage/2013/03/24/sneums-garage#!/
Its free.
 
This is about 3 music poets who died this year, one of them Kevin Ayers
http://www.dr.dk/P6Beat/programmer/sneums-garage/2013/03/03/sneums-garage#!/" rel="nofollow - http://www.dr.dk/P6Beat/programmer/sneums-garage/2013/03/03/sneums-garage#!/
 
 


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My Music: www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com
My blog: www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com" rel="nofollow - www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: March 31 2013 at 12:53
Originally posted by dysoriented

I asked my father the other day if he had heard of some of the 70's prog acts I listen to. To name a few, King Crimson, Hawkwind, Gentle Giant, Caravan... And he said no.
...
 
My guess is that the only things he knew and heard, was the stuff that was mostly played on the FM dial ... you forgot Pink Floyd, Who and YES and such ....which he has heard, and did not acknowledge ... play for him, Roundabout ... ohh yeah, I heard that!
 
A lot of the stuff, in mid 70's became a darling thing in the California area I was, specially after the Rolling Stones, and Led Zeppelin ripped up 100 million dollars each ... and thousands of bands were dumped from most record companies ... which had helped the growth of the FM radio ... and right away, Texaco, and many other companies that owned the record companies, went out and bought the majority of all radio conglomerates around the country to support their product.
 
All it tells me, is that your dad listened to an FM station or two and that was it ... he had other things to deal with and worry about ... a little babe like you maybe! ... and did not spend the time, or money in music. But many folks think that means it "was not there" ... but it was, but you didn't see the arts because it was not your interest, specially if you were in small town USA ... most of the "progressive" things in America had their foundation in the big cities, not the rest of the country!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: March 31 2013 at 13:04
Originally posted by Dean

... 
 PS: every schoolboy my age knew Flash because of the flash of knickers on the cover. Embarrassed
 
Warning: Off topic!
 
I still have that on my wall!
 
And above it ... of course, is Capability Brown's "Voice" with the zipped lips ... and above that? ... you got it ... "Quatermass"
 
Always loved those three covers and the concept of putting them in order like that, just seemed right ... !
 
I liked the original Scorpions cover for their 3rd album, and of course, the original one from Be Bop Deluxe ... which you have to get the poster one ... because it's better than the album cover! I thought about Renate dressed as Marlene ... but that was one of my favorite women in the movies ... so that one was left behind! Now, if you want that picture of Connie Kreski! ... that's mine ... leave it alone!
 
Ohh well, now I have let folks know what my small private room is all about! ... I call it ... music porn!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Argonaught
Date Posted: March 31 2013 at 18:47
I started my prog journey with Genesis, Pink Floyd, Rush, ELP and Yes - through friends, in the mid-70's. That said, I don't really recall these bands being called "prog" back then. 

I didn't get to hear any of the OP's listed bands until much later. 


Posted By: King Manuel
Date Posted: April 01 2013 at 02:07
I kind of started listening to Prog without knowing what I was listening was called Prog. Growing up in Namibia  in the pre-internet era there was nothing that informed me of such a genre. I started buying records by bands called Pink Flyod, Yes, Marillion, ELP,etc. which where actually available there. Somehow I had heard of Pink Floyd and then got into the other stuff. Also being a metal fan I got my hands on Dream Theater´s When Dream and Day Unite and I think thats when I read the term Prog Metal for the first time in some Metal Magazine. When I move to Germany in the  2000s I discoverd through the www at some stage that there are many bands out there that are similar to Yes or Marillion and thats when I got really into Prog. A lot of my money was  in a matter of several weeks invested into mainly Genesis, Van der Graaf Generator, Spock´s Beard, Arena, Ayreon, Flower Kings, Triumvirat, IQ. 

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I'm not one to believe in magic
But I sometimes have a second sight


Posted By: AtomicCrimsonRush
Date Posted: April 01 2013 at 02:13
Hanging around college bars. Also a very good book and lots of old 70s mags such as Rock, Creem, and Circus. i bought these for Kiss but learnt about lots of bands through a collection of these mags. I wish I still had them though as mum binned them when i left home. 

still i heard of a lot of 70s rock this way and also watching Music Tv shows such as Countdown, Night Moves and Sounds Unlimited. Esp. Rock Arena that introduced me to The Residents, and Toyah. Grateful for that!


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Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: April 01 2013 at 17:48
In the 70's, I got into many prog bands from early FM radio.  ELP's "Lucky Man", Tull's "Living in the Past", Yes' "Roundabout", Focus' "Hocus Pocus", Pink Floyd's "Time" & Procol Harum's "Conquistador" all regularly appeared on 70's FM radio.

There were also 2 weekly late night music TV shows, Friday night was "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" on channel 4, Saturday night was "In Concert" on channel 7.  "In Concert" was especially good and showed ELP's performance from the 1974 California Jam.

After that, I made friends with other prog maniacs and we turned each other on to cool prog bands.


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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 10:50
Originally posted by rushfan4

They came to me in a dream one night.
 
Bologne ... he was too ripped to know the difference and the girl took his idea away!
 
We didn't "dream" in those days ... we got stoned!
 
Confused
 
Clap
 
Tongue


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 11:29
Originally posted by Snow Dog

Oh well  I am obviously barking mad. I never heard Prog on mainstream radio. What else can I say? Just explaing why it is not unusual for his dad not to have heard of those bands.
 
In Southern California we had a lot of things on mainstream radio ... in LA alone KMET and KLOS were famous and they became the subject in "Radio Kaos" ... Santa Barbara had Guy Guden ... San Francisco had a lot as well, and even the well known Michael Donohue was major in these things. However, of all these, other than KNAC in Los Angeles, and Guy in Santa Barbara, I am not aware that ANYONE, ever played anything that had lyrics and singing in a foreign language.
 
Madison, WI (late 60's) did NOT have these, but I do not remember the FM station there (the first one in America btw going back to 1930's at the University!) and the pop radio DID play Suite Judy Blue Eyes, Light My Fire, Piece of My Heart, Have Another Hit, Purple Haze and such ... but the concept of longer cuts and better music was not a part of the radio I remember in Madison at all, but was in California.
 
But the "English" scene was already a strong part of my listening ... so the additions in California, for me, was ... the rest of the world! 
 
PS: Don't make me play David Watts for Dean ... he will personally shoot down my Kinks record collection with a shotgun! So would Guy Guden for that matter, for insulting his dress-wear in those days!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 15:42
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

In the 70's, I got into many prog bands from early FM radio.  ELP's "Lucky Man", Tull's "Living in the Past", Yes' "Roundabout", Focus' "Hocus Pocus", Pink Floyd's "Time" & Procol Harum's "Conquistador" all regularly appeared on 70's FM radio.
There were also 2 weekly late night music TV shows, Friday night was "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" on channel 4, Saturday night was "In Concert" on channel 7.  "In Concert" was especially good and showed ELP's performance from the 1974 California Jam.
After that, I made friends with other prog maniacs and we turned each other on to cool prog bands.
Did you happen to see Triumvirat on "In Concert"?   (January 1975)

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 16:05
Originally posted by presdoug

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

In the 70's, I got into many prog bands from early FM radio.  ELP's "Lucky Man", Tull's "Living in the Past", Yes' "Roundabout", Focus' "Hocus Pocus", Pink Floyd's "Time" & Procol Harum's "Conquistador" all regularly appeared on 70's FM radio.
There were also 2 weekly late night music TV shows, Friday night was "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" on channel 4, Saturday night was "In Concert" on channel 7.  "In Concert" was especially good and showed ELP's performance from the 1974 California Jam.
After that, I made friends with other prog maniacs and we turned each other on to cool prog bands.
Did you happen to see Triumvirat on "In Concert"?   (January 1975)

Triumvirat?  That would've been so cool!  Didn't see it, do you recall what they played?  Perhaps the opening song of Spartacus?


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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 16:10
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King


Originally posted by presdoug

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

In the 70's, I got into many prog bands from early FM radio.  ELP's "Lucky Man", Tull's "Living in the Past", Yes' "Roundabout", Focus' "Hocus Pocus", Pink Floyd's "Time" & Procol Harum's "Conquistador" all regularly appeared on 70's FM radio.
There were also 2 weekly late night music TV shows, Friday night was "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" on channel 4, Saturday night was "In Concert" on channel 7.  "In Concert" was especially good and showed ELP's performance from the 1974 California Jam.
After that, I made friends with other prog maniacs and we turned each other on to cool prog bands.
Did you happen to see Triumvirat on "In Concert"?   (January 1975)

Triumvirat?  That would've been so cool!  Didn't see it, do you recall what they played?  Perhaps the opening song of Spartacus?
They played the complete music from Illusions On A Double Dimple-both suites. The concert was filmed during a night on their tour in the fall of 1974 supporting Fleetwood Mac. I'd give anything to be able to see that footage.

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 16:16
The complete Double Dimple???  That would have been amazing.  Spartacus is great but I think I like Double Dimple more.  I just had a look on youtube and unfortunately, there doesn't appear to be any Triumvirat concert videos from the Spartacus/Double Dimple years.

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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 16:24
^I contacted the host of "In Concert" at that time, Don E. Branker, and he said all the In Concert videos from that time were thrown out. I suppose someone watching it somewhere could have taped it on reel to reel, but i don't know for sure.

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 16:30
Sux.  I'm afraid to think of what other great prog footage they might have thrown away  Violin

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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: sukmytoe
Date Posted: April 02 2013 at 17:15
Found the music I have grown to love browsing a store in Hillbrow (Johannesburg) called Hillbrow records. Also through friends who enjoyed the same kind of music that I did. I loved an old valve radio that my grandfather cast out and I used to tune into Radio Nederland late at night - they played a lot of my type of music there - especially on a Sunday Night at one time (I found Radio Nederland trawling the shortwave bands). This was in the very early 70's and my love for music sprang at an early age - around 12 years of age I was then. Since that time I've been a record / album collecting nutcase and I've gathered everything that I could lay my hands on for the past 40 years or so - mainly prog or what we call prog. I had a "lunatic" (I use that term very fondly) friend who hailed from the UK and who lived in South Africa who built his own synthesizer - he was kind of an electronic wunderkind - and he loved keyboard work, loved ELP, Colliseum, Rick Wakeman, etc. Through him I met Julian Laxton and Trevor Rabin during Rabin's time with Rabbitt (South African top rock band). My mother is an award winning classically trained pianist and she loved classical music (Liszt etc) and I suppose I inherited the gene from her right in the beginning although I've always kind of rebelled against the classical music thing in favor of prog rock music.


Posted By: tdfloyd
Date Posted: April 04 2013 at 22:46
My way into prog was only from my brother who had PF's Dark Side of the Moon.  He had a quad receiver and although he did not have a quad recording, the receiver simulated quad.  I had never heard anything like it.  I got into King Crimson after hearing In the Court of the Crimson King on the radio.  I found Tangerine Dream when I asked a friend if he had anything like PF but without the vocals and he came back with Thief.  Other groups were going thru friends record collections,  some was reading magazines.  A little bit of everything.



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