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Prog-Does The Recording Year Matter?

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Topic: Prog-Does The Recording Year Matter?
Posted By: presdoug
Subject: Prog-Does The Recording Year Matter?
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 11:31
I was thinking how i seem to be fixated on the year of a prog recording, and feel blind as a bat if i don't know it.
And i was wondering how the rest of you feel about that?
    Is the year an album was recorded important to you? Is it something you just have to know, or perhaps you could give two hoots about it, and don't care if you don't know what it is?
        I think my date fixation comes from my Historical education and work background (Museum Technology Diploma, and resultant work in museums, historical research and archaeology) where dates are important (though not always the most important thing).
          I am also a big Historical classical music collector, and there, again, i am blind without knowing what year the recording is from.
       
               Does it matter to you?

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               



Replies:
Posted By: Stool Man
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 11:35
It matters a great deal. Context is important, for one thing, as is not being clichéd. If, for example, mellotron intros were old hat in the 1990s, then it makes a difference if the album in question was recorded in the 1990s or in the late '60s.

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rotten hound of the burnie crew


Posted By: HolyMoly
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 11:37
It definitely helps me understand the album better - having it in historical perspective lets you know the context in which it was made.  The country of origin is also helpful to know. 

It's been an unconscious thing all my life, but when I'm listening to something I naturally gravitate towards that line of thinking.  Sometimes if I'm listening to a radio station, and don't know what I'm listening to, one of the first things I'll wonder (or guess at) is when the recording was made.  Then I subconsciously judge it with that in mind.  Some songs are hard to tell.  I can't say whether or not I'm fixated on finding that information, but I am at least naturally curious.


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It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle if it is lightly greased.
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Posted By: HemispheresOfXanadu
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 12:00
I'm not sure if it really matters to me when it was written or recorded, but I like to know. 


Posted By: questionsneverknown
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 12:04
I think it certainly does matter because history matters.  But, I'm like you and tend to think and work with a historical frame constantly in mind.  

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The damage that we do is just so powerfully strong we call it love
The damage that we do just goes on and on and on but not long enough.
--Robyn Hitchcock


Posted By: CPicard
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 12:11
Having studied History, I'm somewhat obsessed by the chronology of various events, including the history of arts or even the chronology of rock music.
So, the recording year does matter to me, if not the month! It's always interesting to understand the choices of production or orchestration and knowing the year of recording can help it.

Sometimes, you hear a record that you enjoy. So, you're checking other albums by the same artist, but are disappointed: what can explain that? Is it an early record, made too soon? Had a key member left? Had the band been urged to write a "hit single" by its label?
Knowing the recording year can also stop some controversies, when an artist claims to have been ripped off by another one: finding traces of an old demo is quite useful in such matters.
It can also help you understand why you think that a band is lame: "Recorded in 1987? 4 years after Marillion's first LP? Oh yeah, now I get why everyone calls them "clone"!"


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Posted By: pfloyd
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 12:21
Should it matter? Probably not. The year a certain album was made should not affect if you like it or not, obviously. But it will really bug me if I didn't know. I want to know the context. For older albums it makes it seem like more of a relic, for lack of a better word. Sorta mystifies the music if that makes any sense. Ermm

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Posted By: Neo-Romantic
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 12:53

To me, the year does not actually matter, at least in dictating quality. I don't have a problem separating historical "significance" from actual quality. For example, if something sounds dated and bland, I don't care if it's a pioneer. It's not going to warrant extra spins if I don't actually like it as much as a more modern album that uses similar instruments, forms, and tricks. The deciding factor is how engaging and emotive the material is to me.

With that being said, it is interesting just for the trivia factor. More of my favorite albums and individual tracks come from 1974 than any other single year. That doesn't mean any other album from that year is guaranteed to be a winner, and especially doesn't mean an album from any other year is guaranteed to be inferior. Ultimately, a year is just a number, not a determination of quality.



Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:07
Originally posted by presdoug

I was thinking how i seem to be fixated on the year of a prog recording, and feel blind as a bat if i don't know it.
And i was wondering how the rest of you feel about that?
...
I am also a big Historical classical music collector, and there, again, i am blind without knowing what year the recording is from.
 ...     
               Does it matter to you?
 
Wait a minute ... it doesn't matter what year the 5th or the 6th were composed! What matters is the ERA that it came from. It doesn't matter what year Petroushka or Rite or Spring were written! It doesn't matter what year Turandot, or The Ring were written!
 
This is beyond weird ... as much music as you know, no history of it has affected your study and understanding of music in the 20th century at all ... that for the most part, everything in the past 50 years has become so popularized and commercialized that all we can think off ... is the fact that Stairway to Heaven came in 1974 (or 1972 or 1971 for those fanatics that are ignoring the theme of the discussion!) and nobody gives a cahoot about the time, the place and the ear ... that created it!  It's not even about a person anymore!
 
Now you know why I am so blaze about these toys and lollipops and surveys and comparisons ... you don't sit here and compare Beethoven to Verdi, or Puccini ... !!!!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Wanorak
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:11
When it was recorded does not matter to me. How good it is recorded and produced does. For example, Trespass sounds like s**t IMO and I can't get past that when listening to it!

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A GREAT YEAR FOR PROG!!!


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:12
I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm

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Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:30
Originally posted by Snow Dog

I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm

1970 wasn't it? (From pure memory)


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In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:32
Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Snow Dog

I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm

1970 wasn't it? (From pure memory)

Or '71 maybe.Smile


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Coldness doth get away with the badness. http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:33
Originally posted by Snow Dog

I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm
 
I think you missed the point this time ... it is not the YEAR that was important ... it is the EAR that will forever remember it ... !!!! Otherwise, even Bach and Handel and all the other music is just crap for you because it wasn't 1514, or 1494 or 2714!
 
Wink
 


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: lazland
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:34
Originally posted by Snow Dog

Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Snow Dog

I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm

1970 wasn't it? (From pure memory)

Or '71 maybe.Smile

Yep. Age doesn't come aloneLOL


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In Lazland, life is transient. Prog is permanent.


Posted By: Progosopher
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:44

For the sake of simple enjoyment of the music, no, the year does not really matter, but good music is like good wine - some years are better than others for the same vintage.  There are a number of conditions which lead to how music is created and presented.  Understanding those is critical to understanding the music and why it sounds the way it does.  Contemporary music has a different quality than classical, not the least of which is the rapidity of the eras.  The 70s are a very different musical era than the 90s.  In classical music, eras are measured in decades, even centuries.  The same insight that Moshkito applies, just on a shorter period of time.   History is important.  I think a lot of people who disparage older recordings, i.e. Sgt. Pepper's, don't understand how radical and innovative it was for the time.  To appreciate how an album is something new, why it is a progression beyond previous works (as many define progressiveness on this site), one must know that historical context.  Being there is helpful but not necessary.  As another student of history, I can appreciate how something that has/had become commonplace and mainstream was at once new and challenging.  Many currently regard, say, Jimi Hendrix as old hat, just another blues rocker, but they don't realize that nobody had done what he did before that and that every guitarist afterwards emulated him one way or another.

Knowing the year of production or release gives a context and provides a framework for how we approach the music.  It conditions our experience.  This is neither a good or bad thing in itself.  So, the year is important for understanding as well as appreciation.  For simple enjoyment, though, I don't think so.  I myself can listen to something from 2009 right alongside something from 1972 and enjoy both equally.  I can alternate between rock, jazz, classical, and various styles from around the world depending on my listening mood.  Knowing the year and place of origin gives me a sense of what to expect.  Geek


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The world of sound is certainly capable of infinite variety and, were our sense developed, of infinite extensions. -- George Santayana, "The Sense of Beauty"


Posted By: Progosopher
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:47
Originally posted by moshkito

Originally posted by Snow Dog

I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm
 
I think you missed the point this time ... it is not the YEAR that was important ... it is the EAR that will forever remember it ... !!!! Otherwise, even Bach and Handel and all the other music is just crap for you because it wasn't 1514, or 1494 or 2714!
 
Wink
 
Yeah!  Sometimes I like to listen to the hits of 1974 and other times the hits of 1794.  Wink  Both were great years for music.

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The world of sound is certainly capable of infinite variety and, were our sense developed, of infinite extensions. -- George Santayana, "The Sense of Beauty"


Posted By: Padraic
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 14:01
1989


Posted By: darkshade
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 14:04
^ That's the cut-off for good music.

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http://www.last.fm/user/MysticBoogy" rel="nofollow - My Last.fm


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 14:13
I actually care more about the year if its the seventies than after 1979. I often get muddled after that but I have a feel for the seventies possibly because I grew up through it and want to place an album in context. Its also fascinating that so many great albums were recorded in 1973 and the genre has been in decline ever since but refuses to go awayWink


Posted By: Metalmarsh89
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 15:12
Originally posted by HolyMoly

It definitely helps me understand the album better - having it in historical perspective lets you know the context in which it was made.  The country of origin is also helpful to know. 

It's been an unconscious thing all my life, but when I'm listening to something I naturally gravitate towards that line of thinking.  Sometimes if I'm listening to a radio station, and don't know what I'm listening to, one of the first things I'll wonder (or guess at) is when the recording was made.  Then I subconsciously judge it with that in mind.  Some songs are hard to tell.  I can't say whether or not I'm fixated on finding that information, but I am at least naturally curious.


This. First I'll try to spot the band, which would naturally deduce the era for me, otherwise, I will try to figure out the year it was roughly made. The year isn't of utmost importance to me, but I do like to ponder it when I'm thinking about the music, and why the band wrote the music when they did.


Posted By: freyacat
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 16:19
That's  a good question, and yes, I do think the year matters!
 
1.  The year helps me evaluate how innovative the music is compared to what was being made at the time, and what had gone before.  Is this the first time someone ever composed a 22-minute rock song, or did others do it first?  Is that melody being played like that because only monophonic synthesizers are available at that time?
 
2.  The year helps me better place the instrumentation and melodic vocabulary.  Actually, based on keyboard sounds alone, I can usually guess the year of a recording.
 
3.  The year places the album in Socio-Politcal context.  Vietnam, Watergate, The Iranian Revolution, Star Wars, Reagan, and the advent of the personal computer all had wide-reaching cultural effects which shaped music.  When Yes composes "The Gates of Delerium," an epic about war, what experiences lay behind the music?
 
 
 


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sad creature nailed upon the coloured door of time


Posted By: Neo-Romantic
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 16:41
I'm definitely curious to see what the results would have been if this topic was posed in the form of a poll. 


Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 16:58
Thanks, everybody, for your interesting and thought-provoking comments. Many things you have said i can relate to directly.
        I never wanted to imply that a date is the most important factor, but it is important, and relates the "context", as has been mentioned.

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               


Posted By: King Crimson776
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 17:09
Originally posted by Stool Man

It matters a great deal. Context is important, for one thing, as is not being clichéd. If, for example, mellotron intros were old hat in the 1990s, then it makes a difference if the album in question was recorded in the 1990s or in the late '60s.

This almost reads like a parody response. If you couldn't tell from just listening to it, and it sounded cool, that's all that matters. I can tell very easily in 99.99% of cases whether the album is modern or not though.

I like knowing the historical context too, but if it turns out you were fooled by something, and it sounds fresh, you can't then say "oh but its not original, I don't like it now". If you were honest anyway, you'd have to adjust, and admit it managed to be inspired in an old formula.


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"It's music, and I like it" - Miles Davis on Sketches of Spain


Posted By: Nogbad_The_Bad
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 20:59
It doesn't matter to the overall quality of the music or how I enjoy it but it is critical to understanding what else was going on at the time, what the available technology was (I'll cut a band a lot of slack if they were using the best equipment available), how it fits into the developmental arc of the bands sound, adding a bit of perspective.
 
I'm sure that ITCOTCK would not rate as highly as it does if it had been recorded in 2001 compared to 1969.


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Ian

Anyone who thinks Kansas is Prog get out of the room - Adolf Hitler



Posted By: King Crimson776
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 21:56
It simply could not have been made in 2001.

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"It's music, and I like it" - Miles Davis on Sketches of Spain


Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 22:18
Yeah. Mainly, for me, it's to put it in context of the band's history. For example, if I didn't know that Abbey Road was recorded after Let it Be, then I'd see Let it Be as a very sad farewell from the Beatles, as, as great as the songs are, it still sounds like they had a sh*t time making it, whereas Abbey Road makes a very cheery ending to the Beatles saga, sense not only is it an amazing album, it's also very cheery and stuff.


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http://bit.ly/1kqTR8y" rel="nofollow">
The greatest record label of all time!


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 22:52
For me the recording year doesn't difinitively mater to me a lot, but it is important to know. I feel that the timeline should be evident to you with Reagards to a bands yearly markings if you want to keep track of how a band has progressed over the years, and to have an understanding of what sound they were trying to embody because of the year they were in. For instance, 1996 was a big grunge year for music and some bands...even progressive took from the influencial movement of 1996. The 1980's was a time of synth pop and Genesis attached themselves a bit to that movement.

All in all. It's not a necessity to know, but it's good to know. :)


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Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)


Posted By: Barbu
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 23:13
Sure.

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Have you seen them Khajiits?


Posted By: A B Negative
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 01:54
I love recordings made from 1969 to 1970.
The recording techniques (smaller multitrack recorders possibly means an emphasis on live takes rather than lots of overdubs) and instrumentation (organs, Mellotrons and earlier synths) are pleasing to my ear.


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"The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar.... Now, that's my idea of a good time."


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 02:05
I log in by recorded year over release year if I have that information.

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Posted By: Gerinski
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 05:34
It's very important in order to appreciate the work but generally speaking it does not make me like the music any more or less, except for some cases like blatant plagiarisms from a previous work.


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 06:06
Originally posted by freyacat

That's  a good question, and yes, I do think the year matters!
 
1.  The year helps me evaluate how innovative the music is compared to what was being made at the time, and what had gone before.  Is this the first time someone ever composed a 22-minute rock song, or did others do it first?  Is that melody being played like that because only monophonic synthesizers are available at that time?
 
2.  The year helps me better place the instrumentation and melodic vocabulary.  Actually, based on keyboard sounds alone, I can usually guess the year of a recording.
 
3.  The year places the album in Socio-Politcal context.  Vietnam, Watergate, The Iranian Revolution, Star Wars, Reagan, and the advent of the personal computer all had wide-reaching cultural effects which shaped music.  When Yes composes "The Gates of Delerium," an epic about war, what experiences lay behind the music?
 
 
 
This

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Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 06:11
Maybe if it's a historic album, and it isn't made in 29, because 29 simply isn't 63 - like 88 isn't 72, and if it's on a tuesday, because then I only listen to 79s and 81s perhaps 36. It's all about the numbers. 68.

59
84
76
11
708
9112


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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”
- Douglas Adams


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 06:34

Sleepy

(smart ass Wink)


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My Music: www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com
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Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 06:37
I thought about re-quoting your post, but then again we all can't run around and eat gummy bears. Some of us has to go for the liquorice.

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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”
- Douglas Adams


Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 06:38
LOL


No you ninja'd me there!


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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”
- Douglas Adams


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 06:39
Lakridspiber that is the thing, and with an important historical hint too.

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My Music: www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com
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Posted By: Guldbamsen
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 06:44
Lakridspiber are made of false lakrids!
Lakrids needs to be strong and hot. I hate the sweet stuff - tastes oddly castrated.

Sorry, I know these things are the bee's knees here in DK, and I do really like the looks of em, I've just never been able to enjoy emEmbarrassed 


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“The Guide says there is an art to flying or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.”
- Douglas Adams


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 11:02
Im getting more and more into everything sweet, not the healthiest development.
But actually I just love lakrids in every shape and form. 


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My Music: www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com
My blog: www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com" rel="nofollow - www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com


Posted By: SquonkHunter
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 11:13
Originally posted by Snow Dog

Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Snow Dog

I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm

1970 wasn't it? (From pure memory)

Or '71 maybe.Smile


For the record: Stairway to Heaven was released 8 November, 1971.

The recording year can give the listener the context in which the recording was made. What may sound dull or derivative today could sound very original and fresh years ago. IOW, was it a trend setter or follower?


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"You never had the things you thought you should have had and you'll not get them now..."


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 14:05
Originally posted by Guldbamsen

Maybe if it's a historic album, and it isn't made in 29, because 29 simply isn't 63 - like 88 isn't 72, and if it's on a tuesday, because then I only listen to 79s and 81s perhaps 36. It's all about the numbers. 68.

59
84
76
11
708
9112
Thanks ... yep!
 
I like random-ness in my listening habits!
 
Btw, numbers upside down also works great!  
 
Embarrassed


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 14:07
Originally posted by SquonkHunter

Originally posted by Snow Dog

Originally posted by lazland

Originally posted by Snow Dog

I'm sure Stairway is from before '74Ermm

1970 wasn't it? (From pure memory)

Or '71 maybe.Smile


For the record: Stairway to Heaven was released 8 November, 1971.

The recording year can give the listener the context in which the recording was made. What may sound dull or derivative today could sound very original and fresh years ago. IOW, was it a trend setter or follower?
 
What a bunch of kooks we all are!   LOL     Wink    Embarrassed    Tongue
 
I put in the incorrect date on purpose! It was just like a puddle that you all were going to step in ... and for my next trick I'm going to get a big tub, fill it up with ____________ and then put money in it, and play "Something is in the Air" out loud ... for all the folks here!
 
This way, at least, we can have a laugh and get the point .... go get that money you fool!


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... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: admireArt
Date Posted: June 26 2013 at 20:56
Those who ignore the past; will repeat it and call it their own. Time is an "un-erraseable" issue!


Posted By: admireArt
Date Posted: June 26 2013 at 20:59
Those who ignore the past; later will call it their own!


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: June 28 2013 at 16:55
I'm totally into the year and think it's part of the fun of having a prog collection.  When I discovered the PA "TOP list custom links and filter" search function I had a blast.  I get totally excited when I find a 70's prog masterpiece I never heard before (like Pentacle, Mona Lisa, Bacamarte, Kyrie Eleison, etc)...discovering buried treasure is a big part of the fun Thumbs Up

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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: June 30 2013 at 12:15
^ very true. I think when you discover a band that you really like and their music is from a certain generation like say the 80's or 90's, I kind of get excited to hear a highly regarded album if it's from the 80's or early 90's recording period.
Certain years and generations carry a certain style of sound.

Just an example. A while back I discovered PSYCHOTIC WALTZ's: A SOCIAL GRACE and I read up on the album before buying it and also saw the recording year was from 1988-1989.
I was immediately very excited. :) the 80's are a special time for me. Actually, still to this day 80's prog remains ageless with me. :)

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Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)


Posted By: Knobby
Date Posted: June 30 2013 at 14:09
I am very suspect about the modern bands/modern sound.
First thing I want to know when it comes to a new band: is it some new inbred metalprog melodic dungus that is feeding off THE IMMEDIATE LAST GENERATION  of AOR/aggressive guitar/stupid simple in-your-face drumming OR...is it the rare new band that actually knows jazz chords and something beyond workstation-style keys?
 
Do they know something about actual composition /counterpoint/ syncopation/vocal harmonies like most of the 70s bands did? Or are they just sucking off the flaccid penis of the last watered-down prog fad.
 
If you are copying the copier, what product you expect to get?
Things become thinner & thinner, angrier & angrier.....shock becomes important.
 
There are good new bands there, but one has to dig much harder - experience more shoite.
Not sure  I'm willing to do that.


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: June 30 2013 at 16:22
Originally posted by Knobby

I am very suspect about the modern bands/modern sound.
First thing I want to know when it comes to a new band: is it some new inbred metalprog melodic dungus that is feeding off THE IMMEDIATE LAST GENERATION  of AOR/aggressive guitar/stupid simple in-your-face drumming OR...is it the rare new band that actually knows jazz chords and something beyond workstation-style keys?
 
Do they know something about actual composition /counterpoint/ syncopation/vocal harmonies like most of the 70s bands did? Or are they just sucking off the flaccid penis of the last watered-down prog fad.
 
^this.  It's very unusual for me to take the time to check out today's new prog bands...like the vast majority of "new" music, I don't find it original or interesting.  I just broke down my 1000+ album collection by decade and it confirms this...

60's albums   6%
70's albums 39%
80's albums 23%
90's albums 23%
00's albums   8%
10's albums   1%


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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: infocat
Date Posted: June 30 2013 at 23:18
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

Originally posted by Knobby

I am very suspect about the modern bands/modern sound.
First thing I want to know when it comes to a new band: is it some new inbred metalprog melodic dungus that is feeding off THE IMMEDIATE LAST GENERATION  of AOR/aggressive guitar/stupid simple in-your-face drumming OR...is it the rare new band that actually knows jazz chords and something beyond workstation-style keys?
 
Do they know something about actual composition /counterpoint/ syncopation/vocal harmonies like most of the 70s bands did? Or are they just sucking off the flaccid penis of the last watered-down prog fad.
 
^this.  It's very unusual for me to take the time to check out today's new prog bands...like the vast majority of "new" music, I don't find it original or interesting.  I just broke down my 1000+ album collection by decade and it confirms this...

60's albums   6%
70's albums 39%
80's albums 23%
90's albums 23%
00's albums   8%
10's albums   1%
That's a shame because there have been some very fine albums released in the 2010s (and the 2000s).


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Frank Swarbrick
--
Belief is not Truth.


Posted By: Knobby
Date Posted: July 01 2013 at 07:20
Yep - and, wot with being a prog masterman, I knows 95% of 'em.


Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: July 01 2013 at 07:58
I am almost exclusively 70s in my prog focus and interest (with some late 60s and early 80s in the mix)
       Not to say that there isn't good music from more recent times, it just doesn't really interest me.

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               


Posted By: Knobby
Date Posted: July 01 2013 at 08:07
It SHOULD interest you.
You are missing out on a lot.


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: July 01 2013 at 12:18
Originally posted by infocat

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

Originally posted by Knobby

I am very suspect about the modern bands/modern sound.
First thing I want to know when it comes to a new band: is it some new inbred metalprog melodic dungus that is feeding off THE IMMEDIATE LAST GENERATION  of AOR/aggressive guitar/stupid simple in-your-face drumming OR...is it the rare new band that actually knows jazz chords and something beyond workstation-style keys?
 
Do they know something about actual composition /counterpoint/ syncopation/vocal harmonies like most of the 70s bands did? Or are they just sucking off the flaccid penis of the last watered-down prog fad.
 
^this.  It's very unusual for me to take the time to check out today's new prog bands...like the vast majority of "new" music, I don't find it original or interesting.  I just broke down my 1000+ album collection by decade and it confirms this...

60's albums   6%
70's albums 39%
80's albums 23%
90's albums 23%
00's albums   8%
10's albums   1%
That's a shame because there have been some very fine albums released in the 2010s (and the 2000s).

I'm sure you're right, but for me it's a numbers game.  I have limited resources and time to explore new bands so I focus on the decades that give me the highest probability of success Wink



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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: prog4evr
Date Posted: July 01 2013 at 13:13
Originally posted by richardh

I actually care more about the year if its the seventies than after 1979. I often get muddled after that but I have a feel for the seventies possibly because I grew up through it and want to place an album in context. Its also fascinating that so many great albums were recorded in 1973 and the genre has been in decline ever since but refuses to go awayWink
Couldn't agree more!  As they say about wine vintages:  "1973 was a very good year..."


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Posted By: Chozal
Date Posted: July 01 2013 at 20:01
I am very biased towards the 80's as only metal managed to sound good in that era recording-wise.
I used to select new albums to check out based on the release year hoping the sound quality would be better in the late 70's but that was foolish.

But certainly, fishing according to decade is something I'm pretty sure most of us did or do ^^


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https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Infinite-Progability-Drive/141225469388975" rel="nofollow - The Infinite Progability Drive , feeding you daily progressive/weird music for just a like <3


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: July 03 2013 at 15:03
Originally posted by freyacat

... 
1.  The year helps me evaluate how innovative the music is compared to what was being made at the time, and what had gone before.  Is this the first time someone ever composed a 22-minute rock song, or did others do it first?  Is that melody being played like that because only monophonic synthesizers are available at that time?
...
 
Now, let's look at this ... the year that Beethoven wrote the 5th, or Mahler wrote his 3rd! So, you're telling me that on the year X, a 22 minute rock song is important, but on year Y, a 22 minute piece of music is not! And today, it would be rock/jazz, and not likely to be "classic" music as it is known.
 
It is not the first time a rock song was written that it was that long, and even engineers like Tom Dowd make some notes and thoughts about that. It is, almost exclusively, that the commercial side of records and then tapes and then CD's were almost all about selling to the public ... it had nothing to do with music, and a lot of music lost its flow because of it, and even the likes of Miles Davis used to get upset when told to cut it down.
 
FACT: Fillmore West, was known for its jams ... and such. Show me, how many pieces are on record and appreciated as such! Almost NONE! ... but the majority of the bands are known and still appreciated ... for the "hits" and small cuts!
 
Now, maybe you can see the appreciation for "music", instead of the controls for it!
 
There has ALWAYS been long cuts ... but because most of our listening habits and mind is so de-sensitized to smaller segments in music due to "radio" and then "tv" and then "hits", our appreciation for music has taken a serious hit in its implementation and definition.
 
Originally posted by freyacat

...
 2.  The year helps me better place the instrumentation and melodic vocabulary.  Actually, based on keyboard sounds alone, I can usually guess the year of a recording.
...
 
Ok. But it more tells about the time and place. We can all mention the romantic period of music, the baroque and the such ... and you can discuss the same thing about instrumentation and melodic vocabulary in those two periods of music.
 
In your case, knowing the keyboard sound (or the synthesizer that created it!) helps you define this even more ... but that's like saying that the Mozart Symphonies are all the same ... nope!  Nope ... there are just as many subtleties there .... that might even give away the same trickery that allows you to say ... that's an ARP Odyseey, that's a Prophet 5, that's a CS3.
  
Originally posted by freyacat

...
3.  The year places the album in Socio-Politcal context.  Vietnam, Watergate, The Iranian Revolution, Star Wars, Reagan, and the advent of the personal computer all had wide-reaching cultural effects which shaped music.  When Yes composes "The Gates of Delerium," an epic about war, what experiences lay behind the music?
 
Ohhh ... my ... so no other piece of music, has ever indicated that to you? ... you have not heard a lot of 20th century music, then ... because it's full of music that are EPIC's about war, and its experiences, and give you an idea of what lays behind the music ... which of course, our spoiled minds in the media days, sometimes don't even believe they were true! Too much rock music ... is distorting your studying and history of music and any of the arts!
 
History has always been there ... and sometimes the music is there and sometimes not ... the difference is ... you see it or you don't! And you sjut showed it here, see?
 
Your post is actually very good, but I wanted you to see that there is more to time ... than just music! Literature, Paintings, Murals, Churches ... you name it ... and they were the epics of the time ... done in the way that was known then ... and this is the hard parallel for us to see.
 
We know today ... and does it have to stop there?
 
 We conjecture on yesterday and rely on "history" to learn from it ... and then find some things here and there ... that also tell you the same thing as the history books. Ex: You only need to see Picasso's Guernica to know everything you need to know about the Spanish Civil War ... and you don't think there was music at that time? ... THERE WAS ...  A LOT OF IT TOO ... and some of it is an hour long and then some! ... but you don't know that, or associate that, or think that it is possible, see?
 
It always was. It is!


-------------
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: July 04 2013 at 15:15
Originally posted by presdoug

I am almost exclusively 70s in my prog focus and interest (with some late 60s and early 80s in the mix)
       Not to say that there isn't good music from more recent times, it just doesn't really interest me.
 
I'm gonna have to lock you up with Djam Karet ... if you take the 1st 5 albums side by side with King Crimson, let's say ... there is no comparison ... oh well ... someday!


-------------
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: TODDLER
Date Posted: July 04 2013 at 20:15
Originally posted by admireArt

Those who ignore the past; will repeat it and call it their own. Time is an "un-erraseable" issue!
I'm starting to believe that.


Posted By: TODDLER
Date Posted: July 04 2013 at 20:34
With me...it's the basics. I never gave any thought to the fact that "Music In A Doll's House" by Family was released in 1968. When listening to this recording...I thought it was reminiscent of Genesis' Trespass, Nursery Crime but, in fact that is not the case and it's quite the opposite. Family must have influenced Genesis. Genesis were not writing that particular style ....not even in 69' because they sounded more like a Bee Gee's clone..and in reality Genesis did not contain that sound and approach to writing until 1970 when they released Trespass. Family were also a huge influence on Jethro Tull. I always had Family albums,but never cared to notice the dates of releases. This was quite interesting to discover and thanks to Dean for waking me up to that small portion of Prog history. Now ..when I sometimes listen to Doll's House ..I have the strangest impression of how certain Prog ideas may have been developed in the 60's.


Posted By: stonebeard
Date Posted: July 04 2013 at 21:52
Knowing the year and technology involved in the recording of any music deepens the appreciation of it. Most people can hear chord changes in music, and that's enough for them, yet still others can identify individual instruments and even work out the actual chords and melodies. This deepens appreciation. One level that people don't often get to is the technological side. The pitch of the drums. The frequencies present in a mix. The space of the instruments in the sound field. Obscure effects and how they're made. Why recordings from the 70s sound different than those from the 80s, 90s, and 00s. When a punch was made on a track. The limits of 8- and 16-track recording and how it influenced actual compositions until the 70s. And one of my favorites - recognizing edits based on hearing the ambient noise of a microphone kick in and out, which I recall on Porcupine Tree's Stupid Dream in particular.

It's not about prog, it's about all music. The more you know, the less somethings impress you and the more other things do.


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http://soundcloud.com/drewagler" rel="nofollow - My soundcloud. Please give feedback if you want!


Posted By: presdoug
Date Posted: July 05 2013 at 08:36
^^^^^^^Thanks, everybody, for your interesting comments.
Something that i don't think has been mentioned yet, that i find fascinating to decipher in music, prog or otherwise, is what i like to call "atmosphere"-the sort of overall feel of a piece of music that relates your mind to something of the time it was recorded. I have got to the point where i can tell the decade a prog album or classical romantic symphonic work was made in simply by the atmosphere it creates. It took me decades of intense listening to be able to do this. Not that "atmosphere" is the most important thing in the music, but it is kind of fun to make a guess and then link it up to the recording date. Just a funny quirk of mine,i guess.

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"and what music unites, man should not take apart"--Helmut Koellen                               


Posted By: TODDLER
Date Posted: July 05 2013 at 23:20
Originally posted by presdoug

^^^^^^^Thanks, everybody, for your interesting comments.
Something that i don't think has been mentioned yet, that i find fascinating to decipher in music, prog or otherwise, is what i like to call "atmosphere"-the sort of overall feel of a piece of music that relates your mind to something of the time it was recorded. I have got to the point where i can tell the decade a prog album or classical romantic symphonic work was made in simply by the atmosphere it creates. It took me decades of intense listening to be able to do this. Not that "atmosphere" is the most important thing in the music, but it is kind of fun to make a guess and then link it up to the recording date. Just a funny quirk of mine,i guess.
I believe I do the same.


Posted By: Bozit
Date Posted: July 06 2013 at 09:20
It does matter because:
The music reflects its times colors,feelings and social feelings.
For example as said in prog rock britannia the 70`s were time that the future seemed to give us flying cars and robot maids because of the amount of technological advances in the the 60`s like the landing on the moon everything seemed possible so the lyrics of the musicians reflected those feelings.
And thats just one example


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: July 06 2013 at 19:07
Originally posted by TODDLER

Originally posted by presdoug

^^^^^^^Thanks, everybody, for your interesting comments. Something that i don't think has been mentioned yet, that i find fascinating to decipher in music, prog or otherwise, is what i like to call "atmosphere"-the sort of overall feel of a piece of music that relates your mind to something of the time it was recorded. I have got to the point where i can tell the decade a prog album or classical romantic symphonic work was made in simply by the atmosphere it creates. It took me decades of intense listening to be able to do this. Not that "atmosphere" is the most important thing in the music, but it is kind of fun to make a guess and then link it up to the recording date. Just a funny quirk of mine,i guess.


I believe I do the same.


You can count me in.   

-------------
Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)


Posted By: maani
Date Posted: July 10 2013 at 19:43
Actually, from a historical point of view, I'm more interested in when a composition/album was WRITTEN, NOT so much when it was recorded. After all, even the "average" album was almost certainly written at least a year prior to its recording date (which may, by the way, be somewhat earlier than its RELEASE date...). But some compositions/albums may have been written even earlier than the recording and/or release date.

Again, strictly from a historian's point of view, the writing date is the most important.

Peace.


Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: July 13 2013 at 11:21
Originally posted by TODDLER

With me...it's the basics. I never gave any thought to the fact that "Music In A Doll's House" by Family was released in 1968. When listening to this recording...I thought it was reminiscent of Genesis' Trespass, Nursery Crime but, in fact that is not the case and it's quite the opposite. Family must have influenced Genesis. Genesis were not writing that particular style ....not even in 69' because they sounded more like a Bee Gee's clone..and in reality Genesis did not contain that sound and approach to writing until 1970 when they released Trespass. Family were also a huge influence on Jethro Tull. I always had Family albums,but never cared to notice the dates of releases. This was quite interesting to discover and thanks to Dean for waking me up to that small portion of Prog history. Now ..when I sometimes listen to Doll's House ..I have the strangest impression of how certain Prog ideas may have been developed in the 60's.
 
Honestly, I prefer to not give a darn about the date.
 
We don't sit here and listen to Beethoven because it was 1821, or Ravel, because it was 1921, or whatever. There might be a connection as to why the music is the way it is, but that is not as important as the music itself ... otherwise we would not be listening ... which is the most important part of it!
 
Again, I consider all of this stuff a natural extension of the growth of music history in the 20th century ... and to me there are no basics ... the only thing there is, is ... music ... that someone created a special moment in time that you and I listen to and love doing so. The only "basic" that was not there 100 years ago, was electricity, which has gone on to change music in ways that no one could ever had conceived of!
 
It would seem trivial, but not to sadistics (per Guy this is statistics and statesmen! hehehe!) who are not really listening to the music at all ... just to one piece they like that happened in 1972! And they compare the world to it. Look, that girl was nice on the cover, but there was more music, not to mention girls! Like saying the ones in that day were different than the ones a couple of years later ... maybe the t-shirt and hairdo ... but the rest?
 
We need to do better on our critical discussions!


-------------
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: July 13 2013 at 12:31
The recording/composition year is important if only to place it in context and in the right chronology. It is important to know that Beethoven wrote the 3rd Symphony after he'd written the 1st and 2nd not just for purposes of being accurate but to understand the development (go on, say it, say 'progression' Wink) in his music. Similarity it helps to know that Tchaikovsky wrote the 1812 some 60 years after the event it commemorates and that it was intended to be a more general purpose celebration piece than the name implies. (Curiously the first performance relied on 'electricity' to time the church bells and canon fire into the orchestral performance.) Context and Chronology. Knowing the context of both pieces (Beethoven wrote the 3rd, the [h]Eroica, in honour of Bonaparte before the events of 1812) helps us appreciate them, and their composers, a little better.


Specific dates only become important when the context needs the precise chronology to define it, 1971 is only of interest when talking about Stairway to Heaven if someone claims that Rolf Harris's 1993 version was the first, or when someone (someone else hopefully) makes the claim that Uriah Heep's 'Come Away Melinda' was an original Heep song. Knowing the date fits the tune into a chronology and that puts it into context.

Recording date also becomes important when the artist decides to re-record the piece (Tangerine Dream, Eloy, Banco del Mutuo Soccorso (Darwin!), Mike Oldfield, The Enid, Rick Wakeman, etc), giving us two different views of the same work and a big stick to thump them with no doubt when the later version is far from being the definitive version.


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If you cannot be wise, pretend to be someone who is wise and then just behave like they would - Neil Gaiman


Posted By: maani
Date Posted: July 13 2013 at 19:03
"1971 is only of interest when talking about Stairway to Heaven if someone claims that Rolf Harris's 1993 version was the first, or when someone (someone else hopefully) makes the claim that Uriah Heep's 'Come Away Melinda' was an original Heep song."

You mean, like people who think Guns'n'Roses wrote Knockin' on Heaven's Door....LOL.


Posted By: Dean
Date Posted: July 13 2013 at 19:07
^ Once, when Annie Lennox's Sweet Dreams came on a pub juke box, I did overhear the comment "That's ironic... some bird's covered Marylin Manson."

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If you cannot be wise, pretend to be someone who is wise and then just behave like they would - Neil Gaiman


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: July 13 2013 at 19:27
I can't say it matters  a lot to me though if some one tells me about a good prog lp that I'm not familiar with from 1974 as opposed to a good one from 2003, I tend to want to hear the older one first.
But for me I think it's due to my age more than anything else.
As an example I love the last 2 IQ cd's as much as most of my older prog.


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Et In Arcadia Ego


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: July 14 2013 at 16:03
Originally posted by Dean

^ Once, when Annie Lennox's Sweet Dreams came on a pub juke box, I did overhear the comment "That's ironic... some bird's covered Marylin Manson."


Uh oh.

Best you had fun correcting him.

-------------
Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: July 14 2013 at 16:05
Originally posted by dr wu23

I can't say it matters  a lot to me though if some one tells me about a good prog lp that I'm not familiar with from 1974 as opposed to a good one from 2003, I tend to want to hear the older one first.
But for me I think it's due to my age more than anything else.
As an example I love the last 2 IQ cd's as much as most of my older prog.


Nice. I feel the same way about IQ. Age can be irrelevant depending on how much you love something. ;)


-------------
Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: July 14 2013 at 16:14
Well. A good example is IQ's TALES FROM THE LUSH ATTIC.
First recording in 1983 was plaqued by horrible sound mixing and production.
Now...2013 TFTLA has been reissued and re-mixed in such a way where it represents IQ's true vision for the album. Suffice to say, I really do prefer the 2013 reissue. The sound quality and production far exceeds that of the original.

This is a classic case where technology saves and restores a classic album. I am very thankful. :)

-------------
Belhold the power and gift of BEARD! As Damian Wilson sports a beard now his voice somehow got even better than it already was. :)


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: July 14 2013 at 17:35
Originally posted by dr wu23

I can't say it matters  a lot to me though if some one tells me about a good prog lp that I'm not familiar with from 1974 as opposed to a good one from 2003, I tend to want to hear the older one first.
But for me I think it's due to my age more than anything else.
As an example I love the last 2 IQ cd's as much as most of my older prog.

I feel exactly the same about the first 2 IQ albums Wink


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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: tamijo
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 03:02
Originally posted by Dean

^ Once, when Annie Lennox's Sweet Dreams came on a pub juke box, I did overhear the comment "That's ironic... some bird's covered Marylin Manson."
 
Not to mention that i won a BOX of beer (30 x 33cl of Carlsberg)
Because someone was THAT sure, "I Shot the Sheriff"  from 461 OB, was an original Eric Clapton Sick
 
One day young people may be of the impression Reggae was invented by Clapton and The Police Tongue
Quite a few people think "Cocaine" was a Clapton too. 


-------------
My Music: www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com" rel="nofollow - www.jokeinc.bandcamp.com
My blog: www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com" rel="nofollow - www.tamijo2013.wordpress.com


Posted By: brainstormer
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 09:11
Most proggers give absolutely no thought to the two Electric Prunes albums in 1968, the ones
that they did in collaboration with David Axelrod.  If prog is also about sound experimentation,
the Prunes were probably one of the top 3 bands that advanced the sonic spectrum in rock music.



-------------
--
Robert Pearson
Regenerative Music http://www.regenerativemusic.net
Telical Books http://www.telicalbooks.com
ParaMind Brainstorming Software http://www.paramind.net




Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 09:58
Originally posted by brainstormer

Most proggers give absolutely no thought to the two Electric Prunes albums in 1968, the ones
that they did in collaboration with David Axelrod.  If prog is also about sound experimentation,
the Prunes were probably one of the top 3 bands that advanced the sonic spectrum in rock music.

I had 'Mass' ...(never bought 'Oath')...., it always sounded like psych rock to me and not 'prog'.
As Dean once said recently on the proto prog thread, 'not all psych rock qualifies as 'proto prog.'


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Et In Arcadia Ego


Posted By: brainstormer
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 11:17
Originally posted by dr wu23

Originally posted by brainstormer

Most proggers give absolutely no thought to the two Electric Prunes albums in 1968, the ones
that they did in collaboration with David Axelrod.  If prog is also about sound experimentation,
the Prunes were probably one of the top 3 bands that advanced the sonic spectrum in rock music.

I had 'Mass' ...(never bought 'Oath')...., it always sounded like psych rock to me and not 'prog'.
As Dean once said recently on the proto prog thread, 'not all psych rock qualifies as 'proto prog.'

I don't see how you can come up with that opinion but to each his own.  "Oath" is just as progressive.

Another note from James Lowe this morning, telling him of more the BS surrounding this album
that I found on Wikipedia:

Robert Pearson:   I just wanted to touch base as
this morning I was alerted the the wikipedia note about your
recent liner notes saying the band didn't record on Mass in F Minor
at all:

Both Mass in F Minor and Release of an Oath were released under the band's name, but because of their complexity were recorded by other musicians and not the band.[3]

The 3 footnote is:

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_In_F_Minor#cite_ref-Prunes_Mass_3-0" rel="nofollow - ^  Unterberger, Richie.  http://www.richieunterberger.com/fminor.html" rel="nofollow - "Liner notes for the Electric Prunes' Mass in F Minor" . Retrieved March 7, 2013.

I can respect it though if you say you don't care any more about
setting it straight as you already did that quite a bit in your
interview with me. 

I'm just curious about these liner notes.  It's funny, it seems like there is a faction
of people out there that really want to discredit the Prunes completely as having
anything to do with being able to play their instruments. 
 
James Lowe: I have always felt the Axelrod group would like to have had the Mass and Kol Nidre to themselves without the bother of a queer named band in the way. We (the original group) recorded the Mass in F Minor ... period. The Kol Nidre album was an obvious cash-in on the band's name and since we had all quit by that time it had no original members playing on it. Period. These people seem to want to rewrite the thing to their liking. Did we support the Mass album ... not really. We didn't think it had merit because we couldn't play it on our own. We needed horns, strings and singers. Maybe this was expected fare for musicians but we were a GARAGE band, for chrissake. Pass the mustard.  (thank you for your interest) jAMES 




-------------
--
Robert Pearson
Regenerative Music http://www.regenerativemusic.net
Telical Books http://www.telicalbooks.com
ParaMind Brainstorming Software http://www.paramind.net




Posted By: moshkito
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 12:58
Originally posted by maani

"1971 is only of interest when talking about Stairway to Heaven if someone claims that Rolf Harris's 1993 version was the first, or when someone (someone else hopefully) makes the claim that Uriah Heep's 'Come Away Melinda' was an original Heep song."

You mean, like people who think Guns'n'Roses wrote Knockin' on Heaven's Door....LOL.
 
Better version of this is ZELIG ... a German band, and it was the soundtrack of the German film of the same name that was ripped up badly later! And if you did not see the original, you missed the hilarious bit in the end!


-------------
... none of the hits, none of the time ... you might actually find your own art, or self, and forego lousy heroes or Guru's!

www.pedrosena.com


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 13:18
^ Wow...I always thought this was the original version of "In the Court of the Crimson King"...

[TUBE]m74ZcEGSUFY[/TUBE]


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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: Sean_96
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 13:54
Whilst the year it was made will not affect the purchase of an album for me, there is some examples where the date an album is released can be detrimental to the band.

The most notable example I can think of is the band 'National Health'. Their albums were released in 1977, '78 and '81. They are a Canterbury Scene band with a very similar sound to 'Hatfield and the North', who are at least in the prog rock community quite well known. But, I don't hear so much about them on 'Prog Archives' which is quite a shame.

If they released their albums around '71-'75, I think in the prog rock community, they would be more well known.


Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 14:59
Originally posted by Sean_96

The most notable example I can think of is the band 'National Health'. Their albums were released in 1977, '78 and '81. They are a Canterbury Scene band with a very similar sound to 'Hatfield and the North', who are at least in the prog rock community quite well known. But, I don't hear so much about them on 'Prog Archives' which is quite a shame.

If they released their albums around '71-'75, I think in the prog rock community, they would be more well known.

A few years ago I went into Tower Records and picked up the double CD "National Health Complete".  This was before slimline jewel cases so it was a pretty big box.  The cashier (named Beau) was clearly the most knowledgeable in the store and I'm pretty sure outside he ran his own record collectors business and almost always had a comment for any prog CD that I bought.  He looked at this one and started laughing.  I asked him what was so funny.  He said something like, "A National Health complete?  They only have like 2 albums anyway".  

Seem's PA isn't the only place this band doesn't get any respect LOL


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I'm using the chicken to measure it.


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: July 15 2013 at 21:55
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King

Originally posted by Sean_96

The most notable example I can think of is the band 'National Health'. Their albums were released in 1977, '78 and '81. They are a Canterbury Scene band with a very similar sound to 'Hatfield and the North', who are at least in the prog rock community quite well known. But, I don't hear so much about them on 'Prog Archives' which is quite a shame.

If they released their albums around '71-'75, I think in the prog rock community, they would be more well known.

A few years ago I went into Tower Records and picked up the double CD "National Health Complete".  This was before slimline jewel cases so it was a pretty big box.  The cashier (named Beau) was clearly the most knowledgeable in the store and I'm pretty sure outside he ran his own record collectors business and almost always had a comment for any prog CD that I bought.  He looked at this one and started laughing.  I asked him what was so funny.  He said something like, "A National Health complete?  They only have like 2 albums anyway".  

Seem's PA isn't the only place this band doesn't get any respect LOL
I have the same cd box......and there is another cd called Missing Pieces that has some nice tracks.
Great band btw.
Cool


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Et In Arcadia Ego



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