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John Wetton - John Wetton & Geoffrey Downes: Icon CD (album) cover

JOHN WETTON & GEOFFREY DOWNES: ICON

John Wetton

 

Prog Related

2.99 | 36 ratings

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brainsuccasurgery
3 stars Having dropped out of the Asia wagon since the station stop from John Wetton there's a couple of decades , I do not expect much from the record production of Geoff Downes. But without me nostalgic for that period of prog, reactivation of the collaboration between the two men could not leave me indifferent.

Their record is called Icon, which is a nice title, and starting with "Let Me Go", a song that Asia might have forgotten to put on his first album back in the majestic inspiration, if not original. With "God Walks With Us", still nothing new under the sun Asian or on the bottom or on the form but an exceptional emotional power enhanced by a guitar solo that works, performed by the impeccable John Mitchell (Arena) . Intro to major organs on the following title, "I Stand Alone", which unfortunately does not avoid the trap of melodic ease unpleasant reinforced by the apparent sentimentality of "Meet Me At Midnight" impression, but swept by the air costs unstoppable "Far Away," the kind of candy would have been able to write the Justin Hayward of the Moody Blues the best years.

Is it useful to review all these melodies slightly outdated or obsolete, but that the moving song Wetton, in his soft, husky voice that has gained flesh it has lost clarity, manages to make pride and depth? Why not, especially since Icon is the most worthy our two prog legends have done something long ago. These ten tracks, alternating catchy soft-rock (the radio calibration worthy verse / chorus of "Hey Josephine"), neo-symphonic prog news ("Please Change Your Mind") and feverish ballad ("Sleep Away" with John Mitchell still comfortable), surely not have the relief of a UK which led him to cry masterpiece, nor for the potential commercial launch of the first Asia (even cry, but from the labels), but you will wait until the next showpiece of one or the improbable resurrection of the other - and if the sentence is too long, repeat slowly from the beginning.

But if you do the math, it lacks two titles in our passage reviewed and these are the two best: "Spread Your Wings" (well of course!), Small pearl breath athlete and careful arrangements (intro piano / violin magic of the rise, and Mitchell, always him, a solo Clive Nolan must regret pass) where Downes put all his knowledge of simple and original melody. And finally the aptly named "In The End", ladies and gentlemen, "In The End", which to my surprise crying with joy, is illuminated by THE great voice of prog in person, I have appointed the former Renaissance Annie Haslam. If I dared, I am happy to finish this review with the name of Annie Haslam.

brainsuccasurgery | 3/5 |

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