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Coil - Stolen And Contaminated Songs CD (album) cover

STOLEN AND CONTAMINATED SONGS

Coil

 

Progressive Electronic

3.71 | 11 ratings

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Dobermensch
Prog Reviewer
4 stars You've no idea how much I looked forward to hearing this in '92. Six months after posting a cheque for 13 quid to Coil themselves it finally arrived.

Without a linear word, letter or goddamn hieroglyph in the packaging, I'd no idea what I was going to hear. All I got was just a bunch of vibrant paint, splattered on the sleeve with no information whatsoever. I once thought I was one of only 1000 people who'd ever heard this limited recording before it was given an official release date years later.

A Patrick Troughton 'Cyberman' introduces the album with the line 'This is the Dark age of Love' - which was supposedly the original title of 'Love's Secret Domain'.

The intro 'Further' is a far more bombastic version of 'Further Back and Faster' from the preceding album. 'Original Chaostrophy' is stripped back to beautiful horns and strings in its brief two minute duration. 'Who'll Tell' has a rather 90's sounding looped bongo drum where spoken bass like vocals are slowed down and sneakily sped up forging an uncanny amalgamation of electronic sound.

In contrast to 'Gold is the Metal' which was a an out-take demo version of the mighty 'Horse Rotorvator' this succeeds immensely better despite being tunes lifted directly from its predecessor. Some folk actually prefer this version and I can understand why. It's more electronica and instrumental than 'Love's Secret Domain'.

The highlight on'Stolen and Contminated' comes next with the splendid 'Omlagus Garfungiloops' - a sexually bass laden dirty lounge track, where clicking fingers are amplified as sleazy, dirty horns blow quietly. Car horns bleep and honk as the never forgettable vocal line emerges with 'Have you been exploding frogs again'. It's very David Lynch 'Twin Peaks' in style. A stand alone track that is equal to what follows.

The superb 'Nasa Arab' is next in this litany of oddness. A 10 minute wobbly masterpiece that throbs and glides with superb structure, intricacy, sensitivity and dark provocation amongst it's heavy beats and thumping percussion. A masterwork amongst many in the Coil discography. It's such a pity it remains hidden on a relatively unheard recording. Honestly, I could listen to this all day. It continually morphs and has some of the most beautiful chords I've ever heard. Not only that - it's upbeat! - can you believe it? - an upbeat Coil song!

If it weren't for the fact that this was a collection of re-worked material I'd happily have given this 5 stars. It's a thing of beauty.

I'm brought right back down to Earth with 'Who'll Fall'. This is an answer machine recording left on Peter Christopherson's phone. Some poor guy appeals to Christopherson to help him understand his best pals suicide after jumping off a cliff. This is all the more chilling and moving when you consider lead vocalist and main man of Coil John Balance fell from a stair-top balcony to his death in 2004. What makes this particularly sad is the gorgeous guitar which thrums throughout in a ghostly manner.

'Stolen and Contaminated' is an excellent action packed album, that would normally gain five stars but is unfortunately stunted due to the simple fact that most of the material was lifted from 'Love's Secret Domain'.

Dobermensch | 4/5 |

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