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Stomu Yamash'ta - Raindog CD (album) cover

RAINDOG

Stomu Yamash'ta

 

Jazz Rock/Fusion

3.58 | 14 ratings

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snobb
Special Collaborator
Honorary Collaborator
3 stars Raindog, great Japanese drummer's Yamash'ta musical collection, began it's life as multimedia happening in London ( with two British vocalists from Jesus Christ Superstar fresh play). Then it was transferred to this album's recordings ( with Japanese rhythm section and avant-violinist).

Music on this album, even with some European jazz fusion elements, is kind of spacey progressive pop-rock soundtrack. With excellent guitar work of heavy guitarist Hozumi Tanka, many classical moments, interesting drumming and some violin explosions. I have a mixed feeling when listening to this music.

Some pieces are great, another are just interesting, and some are really pop-oriented and a bit out of place, but all album in whole is unfocused. More collection of different musical compositions, than conceptual work. Posibly, the main reason is it's in fact a soundtrack, and you need to see the show just to accept the music as it was planned by author.

Anyway, some moments are really nice for listening, but I believe this album is not for a fusion fan. Psychedelic/space prog lovers will find there really more material for them to enjoy.

My rating is 3+

snobb | 3/5 |

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