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MOTHER TURTLE

Mother Turtle

Heavy Prog


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Mother Turtle Mother Turtle album cover
3.76 | 55 ratings | 4 reviews | 38% 5 stars

Excellent addition to any
prog rock music collection


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Studio Album, released in 2013

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. 707 (A November Less) (9:27)
2. Mother Turtle And The Evil Mushroom part 1: The Turtle Conjuration (6:51)
3. The Elf (9:34)
4. Bridge (6:07)
5. God Games (12:16)
6. Rhinocerotic (6:48)
7. Attic (11:09)

Total Time 62:08

Line-up / Musicians

- Kostas Konstantinidis / guitars, lead & backing vocals
- Giorgos Theodoropoulos / piano, synth, sampling
- Kostis Hasopoulos / bass, fretless bass
- Giorgos Mpaltas / drums, backing vocals

Releases information

Artwork: Aristotelis Mavropoulos

CD self-released (2013, Greece)

FLAC download - bandcamp.com

Thanks to aapatsos for the addition
and to Quinino for the last updates
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MOTHER TURTLE Mother Turtle ratings distribution


3.76
(55 ratings)
Essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music(38%)
38%
Excellent addition to any prog rock music collection(36%)
36%
Good, but non-essential (25%)
25%
Collectors/fans only (0%)
0%
Poor. Only for completionists (0%)
0%

MOTHER TURTLE Mother Turtle reviews


Showing all collaborators reviews and last reviews preview | Show all reviews/ratings

Collaborators/Experts Reviews

Review by aapatsos
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR Prog Metal and Heavy Prog Teams
3 stars A very honest and well-worked album, Mother Turtle's self-titled debut comes to add to the impressive releases from Greece in 2013 and is currently available as a "pay-as-you-wish" option from their bandcamp page.

Their sound is an amalgam of influences from the 70's, mostly relying on heavy prog and guitar rock as confirmed by the impressive opener "707" with characteristic and memorable guitar phrases, resembling to Uriah Heep (Byron era) and Greek legends Socrates Drank the Conium. Not less interesting are the more obscure moments found in "Mother Turtle And The Evil Mushroom part 1" and "Rhinocerotic", especially the latter showing an affection towards King Crimson. Often the heavier moods intertwine with mellower and jazzier passages, in the vein of Fusion Orchestra (the more adventurous) and VDGG (the more eclectic). References to more contemporary acts such as Black Bonzo can also be found on the highlight "God Games" and folksy passages find their way via the "Bridge".

Although the production is not crystal clear and the accented vocals could be improved so that Mother Turtle can make the next big step, this debut is very promising and dynamic, revealing high levels of musicianship, skill and taste.

Watch out for that Mother Turtle! 3.5 stars deserved.

Review by Windhawk
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR Honorary Collaborator
4 stars Greek band MOTHER TURTLE was formed back in 2011, originally as a jam band, using the moniker Hogweed. They decided to change their name to Mother Turtle sometime in 2012, following the realization that they really wanted to create their own music, based on common musical interests. "Mother Turtle" is their debut album, self-released in 2013.

Harder edged progressive rock of a vintage variety will probably be the facet of this band that defines them most profoundly, but as far as specific style is concerned, there's probably just as much material here with stronger ties to gentler varieties of classic progressive rock, with a band like Camel one that frequently came to mind. If you can imagine a band that picks bits and pieces from Uriah Heep, Deep Purple and Rush, and blends them into fairly sophisticated compositions with more of a Camel-tinged direction, you should have an indication about what this album is all about. If that sounds interesting, you might want to give this one a spin.

Review by VianaProghead
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars Review Nš 253

The Greek prog scene, despite all odds, continues giving us remarkable albums. This is due to the talent, hard work and above all, the determination shown both by the musicians and the people behind the bands that strive to promote them inside and across borders. Mother Turtle is one of those bands. In the last five years they have managed to make a sensation from the start and have nothing to envy from many other similar bands and releases made outside of Greece.

The Greek band Mother Turtle was formed back in 2011, originally as a jam band using the moniker Hogweed. They decided to change their name to Mother Turtle sometimes in 2012, following the realization that they really wanted to create their own music based on common musical interests. 'Mother Turtle' is their self debut album released in 2013.

Their main features are the perfect balance between structured ideas and experimentation, the technical competence of their music that works in favor of emotion and the smart use of their influences through knowledge of the past decades. Certainly, they don't lack modern aesthetics and expression that gives a new perspective to the term neo-prog without coming as a surprise to the traditional enthusiasts. Mother Turtle's eponymous debut album was a welcoming proposal of a band, which from the very beginning showed a very special ability to mix sounds and influences of an extremely creative and endless music source. So, here we have the 70's unique aristocratic prog rock with no leaps and bounds.

So, 'Mother Turtle' is the eponymous debut studio album of Mother Turtle and was released in 2013. The line up on the album is Kostas Konstantinidis (lead and backing vocals and guitars), Giorgos Theodoropoulos (piano, synthesizers and sampling), Kostis Hasopoulos (bass and fretless bass) and Giorgos Mpalats (backing vocals and drums).

It seems to me that Mother Turtle is a band that has a fairly wide interest in music, and that they seek to incorporate as many of them as possible into their compositions. Their compositions are structurally fairly advanced and are pleasant enough overall to listen, with some fine individual sequences explored generally in a context that manage to maintain the tension well enough all over the album. The use of contrasting sequences gels in a good manner and the flow isn't disrupted. The abrupt transitions that sometimes come across, are logical to follow and don't break the momentum.

Their sound is an amalgam of influences from the classic era of the 70's, mostly relying on heavy prog and guitar rock. Basically, they explore similar landscapes as on the first compositions, with vintage symphonic progressive rock akin to the likes of Camel, alternating with harder edged guitar or guitar and organ driven sequences that at the most intense takes on qualities comparable to the likes of Deep Purple or Uriah Heep, with some vibrant passages that in elements used may be said to be a tad closer to the likes of Rush thrown in for good measure. The general impression is of a band rather form of progressive rock from the past, but also a band that may well incorporate some details here and there from a somewhat more contemporary context as well, gentler neo- progressive details of a classic Marillion style first and foremost. In addition there's room for some jazz tinged details here and there as well, used in good effects.

Of the seven pieces, all are worthwhile listens. All over the album we have the sense that, although the musicians are working really hard, they are also having real fun. The playing is intense. Personally I'd say that everything combines in just about a perfect manner. For instance, on the instrumental piece 'Rhinocerotic', the first half of the track is a brilliant run through engaging themes and arrangements. Still, despite the freneticism of the all track, the vocals retain a lightness that offsets the riotousness of the music. Striking this balance well, as the band has done, is quite a great achievement. The climax is perhaps closer with the last track 'Attic', which displays a bold, electric sound, myriad shifts in time and tone, and striking vocals. We can also say that the guitar playing on the tune, absolutely shines. Also intriguing is 'God Games', where particularly the beginning and end sections sound like a classic jam band music, with in-your-face guitar and driving drums, but the mid section includes a brief spoken, sometimes yelled, religious lecture.

Conclusion: The musicianship founded on this album is a mix of classic prog rock and is excellent throughout. There are catchy guitar leads, retro sounding keyboards, punchy bass, vigorous drumming and dramatic, melodious, and seemingly tongue in cheek vocals, which are sung without any Greek accent, at times, evoking Geddy Lee. These guys have musical chops, and they want you to know that. The harder edged progressive rock of a vintage variety will probably be the facet of Mother Turtle, which defines them most profoundly, but as far as specific style is concerned, there's probably just as much material here with stronger ties to gentler varieties of classic prog rock. If you imagine a band that picks bits and pieces from Uriah Heep, Deep Purple and Rush, and blends them into fairly sophisticated compositions with more of a Camel tinged direction, you should have an indication about what this album is all about.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

Review by Neu!mann
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars The self-titled 2013 debut from the young Greek band Mother Turtle is a competent but undistinguished throwback heavily in debt to a host of better known artists, all dutifully acknowledged on their official website: Camel, Genesis, King Crimson, Porcupine Tree, Frank Zappa, Pink Floyd, Rush, Marillion, Transatlantic, Neil Morse, Pain of Salvation, Kansas, "...and many more prog masters". It's an impressive list to be sure, but with so many yardsticks is it any wonder the band couldn't measure up to its own potential?

I'm willing to cut them a little retroactive slack, because the quartet was new and inexperienced but still willing to embrace a way of music long out of fashion. And because later albums (like their recent "Zea Mice": a stunning achievement by comparison) would fulfill the promise shown but not quite realized here.

Make no mistake: these guys can play. Guitarist Kostas Konstantinidis and keyboard player George Theodoropoulos make a formidable team, anchored by a solid rhythm section led by the nimble bass of Kostis Hasopoulos, sadly no longer with the group. But the problem with this freshman effort, as implied by the Mother Turtle mission statement about trying "to adapt the different elements of prog rock" and "taking advantage of the artistic freedom of prog rock", is that it approached Prog as a style and not as a direction.

The impression is left of a talented group perhaps trying too hard on their first album to recapture the spirit of a halcyon past they never experienced firsthand. Thus the silly fantasy lyrics about Zoltan the evil mushroom who wants to take over the world, and another song about what must be the sorriest elf in Prog Rock fairy tale history, all related by a singer unfortunately prone to occasional hyperbolic emotion (that must be the Neal Morse influence...)

Hints of a brighter future can be heard in the urgent instrumental jamming of "Rhinocerotic", the album's one purely musical digression. Here at last the Turtle throws off its shell and, for seven exhilarating minutes, is finally able to evoke all the Aegean Rock colors absent from the boilerplate Anglo-centric Prog weighing down the rest of the album.

Not a bad career start, all in all. But the group could, and would, do better, once they discovered their own musical voice.

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