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MARCO RAGNI

Psychedelic/Space Rock • Italy


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Marco Ragni biography
Born in 1969 (Rovigo, Italy)

Marco Ragni is an Italian multi-instrumentalist, who has always been active in musical genres that include a psychedelic aspect. He started playing at age 6, in 1975, on a Farfisa keyboard he got as a present.
His main influences for singing have been The Beatles, and his psychedelic influences start with the California hippie scene of the 1960s.

In the late 1980's, he recorded two psychedelic pieces, Kaleido and Illumination, before joining the band Deshuesada, a psychedelic pop band that would keep him busy until 1998. Between 2000 an 2007 he played with Quartafila (later Heza) an recorded three albums with them, before playing one year with psychedelic funk rock band Mokers in 2008, resulting in the EP Don?t forget the music.

From 2009 onward, Marco Ragni acts as a solo artist, composing and playing his own music, with varying guest musicians. Between 2010 and 2013 he released 5 studio albums and a live album through his own Crow records label. The live album contains recordings made with a band he established for touring, Velvet Cactus.

In 2014 he released Mother from the Sun, his (first) psychedelic rock opera, which sounds as a modern Pink Floyd and a bit more.

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Buy MARCO RAGNI Music


The Wandering CaravanThe Wandering Caravan
CD Baby 2018
$16.26
$16.22 (used)
Land of Blue EchoesLand of Blue Echoes
CD Baby 2016
$9.99
CaliforniaCalifornia
CD Baby 2016
$12.41
$15.61 (used)
In My EyesIn My Eyes
Crow Records 2010
$13.98

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MARCO RAGNI discography


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MARCO RAGNI top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.88 | 8 ratings
In My Eyes
2010
3.91 | 11 ratings
1969
2011
3.64 | 11 ratings
Lilac Days
2012
3.92 | 63 ratings
Mother From The Sun
2014
3.91 | 17 ratings
Land Of Blue Echoes
2016
3.71 | 44 ratings
The Wandering Caravan
2018
3.12 | 7 ratings
Oceans of Thought
2019

MARCO RAGNI Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.40 | 5 ratings
On air
2013

MARCO RAGNI Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

MARCO RAGNI Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.67 | 3 ratings
Psychedelicious: The Collection 2002-2012
2013
0.00 | 0 ratings
From the Origins to Somewhere
2019

MARCO RAGNI Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.25 | 4 ratings
Hidden Sun
2015
3.13 | 8 ratings
Rajanty
2016
4.80 | 5 ratings
California
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Open My Arms (feat. Bjørn Riis)
2019
3.00 | 1 ratings
Black Room Ep
2019

MARCO RAGNI Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Oceans of Thought by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2019
3.12 | 7 ratings

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Oceans of Thought
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

3 stars Marco Ragni is a psychedelic/space rock artist from Italy. He has been active in the music industry for several years being mostly attracted to psychedelic music. In 2010, he released his first solo album and has released 7 albums since then. His 7th album is called "Oceans of Thought" which was released in June of 2019. Most of his album include him as the main performer with several guests to help out. On this album, Ragni does the vocals, guitars, keys and bass. The other core members of his band for this album include Peter Matuchniak on electric guitar, Dave Newhouse on woodwinds, Jeff Mack on fretted and fret-less bass and Chapman Stick, Maurizio Antonini on drums and Jojo Razor on backing vocals. The album consists of 9 tracks ranging from 3 minutes to almost 10 minutes.

The album starts out with 3 shorter tracks around 4 minutes each. "Flashlights" begins with gentle acoustic guitar, but suddenly switches gears when the band kicks in with guitar, synth and woodwinds. A short vocal interlude starts halfway through with a mix of Marco's and Jojo's vocals. A sudden blast of guitar improvises off of the main guitar theme. "Dizziness" emphasizes different keys and more brassy woodwinds. Vocals come in quickly and then the guitars bring more intensity to the track. The music softens and the percussion stops as the music goes more acoustic with guitar and flute, then strengthens again. At 3 minutes, the music softens again with acoustic guitar and more vocals, with more layering and harmonization. Marius Halleland plays lead guitar on this track and also on the next 3 tracks. Next, "Hammil's Thoughts" starts with piano and a symphonic synth effect. The vocals are more emotional on this track. It remains slow and thoughtful to the end.

Now the next three tracks are around the 6-7 minute mark. "The Wind Blows Anyway" starts off mellow with acoustic instruments and more emotional vocals from both Marco and Jojo. During the 2nd verse, the drums kick in giving more energy to the track, but remaining at a moderate pace. Synths are also added to the mix. The percussion drops off again and the pattern repeats a few times without much change. An instrumental interlude comes in before the 5 minutes mark. But the music remains pretty standard without any hint of psychedelic or space rock for that matter. Layered vocals come in at the end. "Regain Control" continues in the same style as the previous track with acoustic guitar and layered vocals. Drums and glittering synths come in, but the music still moves along in a moderate and straightforward manner, with maybe a slightly more complex melody, but mostly unmemorable. Things get a little more interesting when the long, instrumental break comes in before 3 minutes with a good guitar solo, and a bit of progressive changes, but it falls apart when the vocals come back in, striving for a folk influence, but feeling not very authentic with the flat melody. The title track "Oceans of Thought" comes next. Starting with a nice piano introduction, vocals and strummed guitar comes in. The track has a more rhapsodic flair to it, but still no sign of psychedelic or space rock. There is a sudden change in vocal timbre as they get deeper and more ominous. A moderate beat comes in and a nice guitar solo makes things even better. This intensifies as it goes along, then softens again bringing back the vocals. This track is much better and is a highlight among the tracks thus far. Another great solo finishes off the track.

Next is a short interlude called "Under a Big Red Sun" lasting just over a minute only. This is a nice acoustic solo. The two following tracks are both over 9 minutes each. "Voice in the Dark" again starts with a smooth acoustic guitar with the vocals bringing in the woodwinds and synths with a pensive melody. There is also a sitar playing in there, but even it's mystical sound doesn't bring in any psychedelic sound. However, the melody, even though it is not really complex, it is at least interesting. Keyboards follow the vocal melody and do most of the support here with drums anchoring everything. A sudden tempo change brings in another good guitar solo based around the main theme before it gets a bit darker and improvises more freely. The tempo slows again, but the guitar continues. The rhythm drops out when the wordless vocals come back with only acoustic guitar, and then more lyrics. After another verse, the sitar comes back in, and then an over-emphasized vocal brings the band back in, with more guitar. Again, the tempo speeds up as before. This is probably the closest to a space rock style as it comes, but I would still be hesitant to name it that as it seems too structured.

The last track is "Open My Arms". It begins with a lone piano and soon vocals come in. The rest of the band comes in about a minute later, but things remain at the same moderate sound that the album is replete with. The rhythm backs off again for a repeat of this pattern. The vocals get more emotional on the 2nd go round. After the second verse, it gets more atmospheric, but all levels out soon enough for another moderate beat and more guitar. But, there still is no psychedelic or space rock sound here, just mostly straightforward rock with a little progressive flair here and there. Bjorn Riis also guests on guitar on this track, but it doesn't bring the track any more life in the end.

The overall feel of this album is definitely not the psychedelic or space rock sound that this is labeled with. I know I have mentioned that several times during this review, but I just wanted everyone to come into this album expecting that when the music is actually quite accessible and straightforward. The guitar and piano solos are nice, but there really isn't a lot of substance to this album, nor is there anything that stands out. It's good music, for the most part. A few of the melodies are a bit uninteresting and tend to meander a little bit. The best track here is the title track, but the others are only just all right.

 Land Of Blue Echoes by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.91 | 17 ratings

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Land Of Blue Echoes
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Having enjoyed Marco's 2018 album, 'The Wandering Caravan', I have now gone back to the previous release, 2016's 'Land of Blue Echoes'. He again provides multiple instruments himself, and has brought together a stellar cast of musicians, including the wonderful Peter Matuchniak on acoustic and electric guitars. Colin Tench also provides guitar on the opening number, "Between Moon and Earth", which made me stop when I realised as it is nearly the first anniversary of his sad passing. We had been swapping emails on Christmas Day in our normal jokey manner, and just two days later he was gone. Both Poms, both living away from the land of our birth, at opposite ends of the planet, he signed his off "Colin of the North".

But, this isn't one of Colin's great albums, but again another masterpiece by Marco. He not only provides vocals, acoustic and electric guitars, Greek bouzouki and bass, but also keyboards and piano. His ability to play multiple instruments enables to get the best out of those he is working with, with masterful arrangements. Drummer Jacopo Ghirardini is a monster behind the kit, driving complex rhythms (or sitting there having a rest), while Peter demonstrates yet again that he can turn his guitar style to anything at hand. He can be delicate and restrained, Gilmour or Latimer-like, or he can turn on the overdrive and become far more powerful.

It is the multiple styles that makes this such an interesting album to listen to, with elements of Pink Floyd and (especially) Tangerine Dream giving way to some driving hard rock, all controlled and making perfect sense throughout. There are a couple of epics on the album, which comes in at more than 70 minutes long, and although there are long instrumental passages there are also some wonderfully delicate and powerful vocals from baritone Durga McBroom, which add to the feel of class which is prevalent throughout this release. Strong bass counter rhythms and melodies, Spanish guitar, it all combines to produce yet another compelling album from Marco which is well worth investigating.

 The Wandering Caravan by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.71 | 44 ratings

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The Wandering Caravan
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Marco Ragni is a bit young to be a child of the flower power years but that has never stopped him from keeping the music of those years close to his heart. His 2018 release "The Wandering Caravan" is a prime example of his devotion to the music of the late sixties and early seventies. But Marco is not one to simply attempt to resurrect the past. Marco's music seems to have come exactly from those days and is then filtered through Marco's magnificent brain.

The album begins with a bird's call and footsteps outside before a psychedelic acoustic guitar makes us want to just lie back and chill, letting the notes carry us into our minds. Then abruptly, the whole band drops in with a wham and now we're on an electric ride. With barely a proper warning, the music halts and permits some strumming of an acoustic guitar. At last now we here the lyrics to "What We have Done in the Past We'll Be in the Future," the first track of the album. It's an 11:25 song that delivers thought-provoking lyrics, followed by an exciting psychedelic rock passage with organ and electric guitar solos. Take note of the saxophone in the song, too. This track is an excellent introduction to the album and you can expect more of this kind of music.

"Waiting On the Threshold" begins with some thoughtful piano and singing, but at the line "And I saw that all is not lost," the music is given over to a clean electric guitar that wanders with a bass guitar into 1969 and searches absentmindedly for meaning until Marco comes back to gives us more singing, accompanied by flute. Then more of this psychedelic guitar, soaring and diving.

Before long, my impression of this album is that we are listening to poetry set to music and music set to poetry. It's like each song is part of a series of related thoughts. The music keeps changing and delivering different themes but there's an overall cohesive atmosphere. As if to confirm this, at least twice a track will reference a bit of music from a previous track. It's also interesting to note how sparse yet profound the music can be during some of Marco's poetic illustrations in the lyrics while at other times, during the instrumental passages, the music can be more fluid and adventurous.

This is not just an album for lying back and relaxing to. The music will tell you that the lyrics demand to be heard and weighed. As such, this is no light listening if one is to become fully absorbed. There's little in the way of catchy hooks and sing-a-long melodies. This is more of a journey through the thoughts of a man considering his and our place in life and time. Meanwhile, hints of Pink Floyd, Jefferson Airplane, and others emerge here and there.

As an interesting aside, this album was way up near the top of the PA Top 100 of 2018 back on June 18th of this year. Listeners seem to agree that this album has its share of magic.

 The Wandering Caravan by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.71 | 44 ratings

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The Wandering Caravan
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Multi-instrumentalist and singer Marco Ragni is back with his latest album, and what an album it is. While he provides vocals, electric and acoustic guitars, bass, keyboards, mellotron, piano and mandolin he has also been joined by Dave Newhouse (sax, clarinet, flute, keyboards and woodwinds arrangements), Peter Matuchniak (lead guitar), Jeff Mack (bass) and Maurizio Antonini on drums, plus a few guests adding different nuances. This means this album includes members of The Muffins, Bomber Goggles, Scarlet Hollow and Barock Project, so it is a given that the guys all know their ways around their instruments. What this has enabled them all to do is to relax completely, and the result is an album which in many ways is the loosest I have ever come across. We often talk about how tight a band is, how they are right on top of each other, but here they sound as if there is a great space between them all and between the layers, allowing the music to fully breath and go where it desires.

The album title is apt, as there is a feeling of a great sky and a bleak landscape, and the travellers knowing not where they are going, when they are likely to reach the destination, or even if it really matters. This is a musical journey that is given a very middle eastern feel at times with the use of the oud, while it is also often reflective, with a great deal of restraint. It is an album which demands to be savoured like a fine brandy: take the time and let all the nuances and textures hit every sense. It is progressive, it is psychedelic, it is nearly New Age (but not quite, they don't inhale), it is World, it is delicate, but there is an inner strength and core which keeps everything moving in the same direction.

Often it is just Marco singing in a reflective manner, but during "Promised Land" there is even room for many singers and for Peter to become more direct in his approach. Maurizio is also one of those drummers who understand that there are times to play, and time to listen to the band with everyone else, and that restraint also has a key part to play. This is quite some album, and is well worth discovering by all good music lovers.

 Mother From The Sun by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.92 | 63 ratings

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Mother From The Sun
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

4 stars If you haven't heard Marco Ragni's music yet, then you might just be missing out. I have five albums of his (two EPs, two full-length albums, and one double disc) and he remains quite consistent, though by consistency I do not mean that he's in any way limited to a narrow soundscope. To give you an idea, think of the Pink Floyd albums A Saucerful of Secrets, More, Ummagumma, Atom Heart Mother (side two), Meddle, and Obscured By Clouds as major inspirations. Add to this the late sixties California hippy scene and the fact that Marco is Italian, and you have three strong foundations for a unique blend of psychedelic music with folk and funk and classic prog. Marco's EPs are more like tangents sprouting off his core collective of musical musings, while his full-length albums firmly map out his territories.

His 2014 double-disc release, "Mother from the Sun" was his magnum opus, he claimed around the time, though honestly, I see no stopping this guy, who just released his latest master work, "The Wandering Caravan" and is already composing something new. If you are going to get into Marco's music, perhaps "Land of Blue Echoes" or the latest album will be easier to digest, but if you are sure Marco's music is something you dig, then welcome into your home this double-disc heavy weight that is "Mother from the Sun".

I'll admit that the first two or three plays were a lot to properly digest. That's largely because I listen to music while commuting and that means a lot of walking and train riding, so it's easy to become absorbed in thoughts of upcoming must-dos or seeing what's up on social media to pass the time. Because some tracks are epics ranging from 15 minutes to 22 minutes with several changes in the music while many others run by in under two minutes, it's easy to become lost in the overall atmosphere and not really notice when a track begins or ends. At first, I felt it was like traveling through a musical world engulfed in a earthly haze while various solid objects appeared, captured my attention, then passed by. But this week I have been listening more carefully and I have found the true wonder of the musical landscape was laid out clear for me to enjoy all along!

Without describing each track in detail, you'll find beautiful cascades of acoustic guitar notes, funky classic seventies organ, psychedelic fuzz-toned slide guitar, sit-by-the-seaside hard-picked acoustic guitar, washing waves of classic Pink Floyd organ chords with echoing guitar notes, solidly driving psychedelic rock, and trippy passages. Marco can make you strut and sway, sit back and space out, groove to the music, float on a cloud, or see everything in quadruple. This is true for his music overall, but "Mother from the Sun" is indeed a musical trip that rewards the careful listener much more than the casual listener. I'd say that there's gold in them there hills, but that would be stealing a line from his "California" EP.

 The Wandering Caravan by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.71 | 44 ratings

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The Wandering Caravan
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Just another album which takes time to reach for the real depth .... Recorded by MARCO RAGNI's Wandering Caravan outfit here we have a well-crafted melange of melody, accessibility, but also complexity, diverse twists, turns and rough-edged moments. For what prog is about, isn't it? This appeals to me the more I'm listening. Apart from the overall psychedelic backbone there is much richness to state. The starter What We Have Done In The Past We'll Be In The Future proves this while juggling with oriental flair, folksy acoustic guitar and flute as well as rocking excursions decorated with saxophone, dashing organ and soaring electric guitar. A heavy load, when intending to capture this composition in its entirety.

Thoroughly convincing. I already had kept an ear on Marco's previous albums, but this one is a great leap forward definitely. First of all the Wandering Caravan gives excellent musicians a lift. And the compositional attempt is very successful, top notch. Wonderful smooth parts and raucous vocals are Waiting On the Threshold. Especially right in the middle the song triple Which Is The Right Path To Take, It's Only Fantasy and What Are We Willing To Lose To Regain Our Freedom is an inseparable experience. A dreamy atmosphere, nice piano sequences again and again, a partial hallucinative downfall in between ... bravo! Melodic Revolution Records can be proud of having another top album on the back catalogue.

 Land Of Blue Echoes by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.91 | 17 ratings

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Land Of Blue Echoes
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Italian composer and musician Marco RAGNI have a career that stretch back to the 1980's, but then as a member of a variety of different bands. From 2010 and onward he has catered for a solo career, one that have seen him release five albums so far. "Land of Blue Echoes" is the most recent of these, and was released through US label Melodic Revolution Records in the spring of 2016.

Ragni's fifth solo album showcase a composer and musician that appears to be confident in what he wants to achieve and how he wants to achieve it, using guest musicians in select places to elevate the total experience for the end listener and otherwise paving out a path for himself in a subtly folk music inspired and distinctly atmospheric laden psychedelic part of the progressive rock universe. Similarities to Pink Floyd is a part of the totality, but not to any great extent. That being said, I still suspect that those with a taste for late 70's Pink Floyd may well be something of a key audience for this album.

 Land Of Blue Echoes by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.91 | 17 ratings

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Land Of Blue Echoes
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by FragileKings
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I am surprised to see that this is the first review of this album that was released in March of this year, 2016. I have already read two reviews praising this album, but it seems so far to have flown under most prog radars here.

Marco Ragni is no up and comer. His 2014 album "Mother from the Sun" made it on the PA Top 100 of that year. And though his PA discography only includes five studio albums plus three others, his homepage includes some 11 releases. His catalogue on PA begins with his 2010 release "In My Eyes" which has a score of 4.25. Prior to his solo career he was involved in other bands for some 30 years.

"Land of Blue Echoes" has a very strong early seventies Pink Floyd vibe to it, but Marco doesn't lean solely on this rock. There are a number of surprises that keep this album ear-worthy. We begin with the short, spacey instrumental with a late sixties guitar sound and spoken recording at the beginning. Colin Tench (Corvus Stone, CTP, Oceans 5, Minstrel's Ghost, etc.) provides some lead guitar work. A very good start to the album!

There's a quick turn, though, as the 15-minute "Horizons" begins with harp and flute before transforming into a cosmic space rocker. The drums are pretty up front in the mix, and I'll admit that from my perspective it sounds more like listening to someone play drums along with the track. But just when you think you've got the album sussed out, a harpsichord becomes the sole instrument with Marco's vocals. The music changes once more with a spacey slide guitar bit and goes more up tempo with organ and guitar. That gives way to piano and then we reach a delicate solo piano segment. The track goes through a couple more twists and turns before returning to the cosmic theme near the beginning and wraps up with a bit of harp. There's a lot going on during these 15 minutes and a few choice parts for my ears.

The title track is a piano waltz with acoustic guitar and strings. There's an emotive, early seventies-inspired guitar solo to bring this shorter track to a close.

"Money Doesn't Think" is a rollicking track that sounds somewhere between "Dark Side of the Moon" and the more up tempo side of "Wish You Were Here" but with lead guitar that could have come off "Meddle". It eases back a bit more the sung parts but for the instrumental segment we are back into the exciting rolling and grooving part with some great lead guitar work. One of my favourite tracks!

"Canto D'Amore" will turn your head for sure with its harp and acoustic guitar and beautiful vocals sung in Italian. This was the first track on the album to really make a deep impression on me and even now after several listens it remains my favourite. Prog should have more harp!

Durga McBroom, who has sung "Great Gig in the Sky" and backing vocals for Pink Floyd, sings the lead vocal here. The music is very eased back with organ and electric guitar and McBroom's excellent vocal performance. Style-wise, it's not exactly my preference; however, there is no questioning the music and vocal performance.

"Beltane" is another favourite of mine. Acoustic guitar and a folk prog approach, this song features what sounds like backwards wah-wah guitar playing and has a strong cosmic rock feel in parts. There are some spoken recording added in and a ticking clock that will surely remind you of Pink Floyd again, and another smooth and soul-felt guitar solo.

The longest track on the album is "Nucleus, Pts. I-III". It covers a range of moods from more Pink Floyd-inspired lead guitar to Durga McBroom delivering a "Great Gig in the Sky" vocal performance, to more eased back cosmic groove to some great early seventies guitar rock groove with some cool, simple but chunky bass. This track of nearly 23 minutes covers a lot of ground though overall there's a laid back feeling of continuity. Some parts are a little easy to drift away in but it's not too long before something happens that reels you back in.

"Queen of Blue Fires" is also an outstanding track for me. It begins with clean electric guitar in a style almost like Pavement or Sloan but brings in organ. The chorus is the catchiest of the whole album and there are more organ, keyboard and acoustic guitar parts that are handled wonderfully. An excellent track to wrap up the album.

Though it's not every song that perks up my ears, Marco Ragni has created an album that really shows off his song- writing and multi-instrumentalist skills. If there's one criticism I have it's that sometimes the electric guitar lead work has some scratchy echo to it that works to create an atmosphere in most cases but sometimes sounds a little harsh. The drums sound great, especially the toms, but once or twice they seem to be a bit loud and to the front of the mix. I give this album a solid four stars and I am now considering which album I should go for next. I recommend this album to anyone who thinks they can enjoy early seventies, Pink Floyd-inspired, cosmic rock with some twists such as delicate piano solos and a song composed for harp and vocals. The digipak is quite beautiful, too!

 Mother From The Sun by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.92 | 63 ratings

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Mother From The Sun
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Marco Ragni is an accomplished Italian musician who prefers the psychedelic tendencies of Pink Floyd, which should not come as a surprise as Floyd is, after The Beatles, probably the most successful rock band anywhere. Besides Dave Kerzner's recent 'New World' release, this would be the finest PF styled recording on the market today, a clear and well defined opus that spans over 2 hours on 2 CDs. My esteemed friend and colleague Angelo has dissected the lyrical content, so I will refrain from paralleling his excellent observations and just focus on the music. The colossal set list is loaded with epic tracks that are woven with silkily smaller threads that act as bridges and intermezzos.

With a profoundly riveting bass line, 'Into the Wheel of Time' sets the controls to the heart of the Mother from the Sun, swooning electric guitar filaments weaving among the gentle rhythmic lilt, a bright sunshiny vocal from Marco and finally sliced open by a serene sax solo from guest Enrico di Stefano. This is most pleasant and utterly enticing 9 minute + psychedelic romp of the finest quality. The equally extended 15:15 long 'Sea Vibes' extols the virtues of glistening acoustic guitar interplay from guests Giovanni Menarello and Davide Gazzi, challenged by Enrico Cipollini's electric device and bolstered by Marco's now ballsier voice. The rhythm shuffles nicely, the bass guitar less prominent then before, all the focus is one the web created by the various 6 strings, and the complex vortex they create, harmonious one moment and suddenly despairing the next. The true essence of disquieting space comes across in the floating nature of the seamless arrangement, extremely deliberate and completely relaxed. One of the finest tracks ever, the sensationally distraught guitar solo is one for the ages, closer to Hendrix than Gilmour, raging and rabid as opposed to languid and pastoral.

'Haven of Marble' is another longer piece, this time clocking in at over 17 minutes, a thrilling platform that gives Marco a chance to comment on human stupidity in dealing with nature and finding crude (oops!) ways to screw the planet up perhaps permanently. The bass grumbles nicely giving a lot of gravitas to the subject matter (Marco does get theatrical in the vocal department) and launching a blistering explosion of pyrotechnics that sizzle slowly at first and then the boom-boom-tchak drum machine kicks in! Cipollini loosens a nasty rip, full of anger and disdain, tortuous and irate, a thrilling solo indeed. Ticking clocks, moody shifts and that darned saxophone blaring through the thick rain-soaked clouds, yes, there is atmosphere and creative expanse in these grooves.

A trio of short ditties, the first is 'Faint Memory' is mostly acoustic piece, guitar, keyboard special effects and voice. The second is 'The Light is Burning' and is more vocal oriented, upbeat and intense. Last is 'Get out of Here' and they all serve to expand on the story and offers no real musical journey as such. Not to panic, cosmonauts, the massive epic is coming up in the form of 'Far beyond the Line', a 4 part extravaganza that spans a whopping 22 minutes and change, with loads of detail and essence. A sparkling piano leads the way, gliding along a gorgeous melody and an angelic vocal that espouses an awakening of a conscience and some clarity in the road ahead. Acoustic guitars and flute intertwine like two perennial lovers for the longest time, until a jagged Gilmourian slide flight settles in, overtaking the spiralling vortex of sound and pulsating like a hurricane gone berserk. This is quality material indeed.

From here on in, the mood swerves into more acoustic realms, very trippy nevertheless with some late 60s brightness, contradicted by an absurd buzz-saw linear axe solo on 'Skies painted by the Wind' that has more Fripp to it than anything. A quartet of sparser songs finishes off the opus, a musical voyage of great value and character. As for finding some negatives, there are some but quite minor in the grand scheme of things: programmed drumming can be a distraction for some purists (I have no problem with it when it is well done), I would have liked more saxophone (but that just me) and on occasion Marco's voice can be tinged with a little overkill and sounds forced. But again, it's kind of normal to pick out nits in such a huge work.

Great cover art and a neat package that should please psychedelic rock fans of all stripes.

4 Solar mammas

 Mother From The Sun by RAGNI, MARCO album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.92 | 63 ratings

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Mother From The Sun
Marco Ragni Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Italian composer and musician Marco RAGNI has been a presence in the Italian music scene for a quarter of a century or thereabouts, and following a couple of decades in various band constellations he decided to venture out as a solo artist a few years back, launching his first solo album back in 2010. "Mother from the Sun" is his fourth studio recording, released towards the end of 2014.

Marco Ragni is a seasoned composer and musician, and "Mother from the Sun" is an accomplished affair that comes across as a solid and well-executed production on just about all levels. The compositions can have a tendency to be a bit too loose in structure at times, although this will first and foremost be an issue for potential listeners outside of the progressive rock crowd, and hence a minuscule issue due to that. If you have a soft spot for artists seeking inspiration from Gilmour-era Pink Floyd this is most likely an album you should seek out, and in particular if music of this kind with a lighter mood and a few more gentle psychedelic details sounds like a good thing to you.

Thanks to angelo for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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