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OVRFWRD

Heavy Prog • United States


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Ovrfwrd picture
Ovrfwrd biography
Founded in Minneapolis, USA in 2012

This is a four piece American band that plays instrumental progressive rock. They were formed in 2012 with drummer Rikki DAVENPORT, guitarist Mark ILAUG, bassist Kyle LUND and keyboardist Chris MALMGREN. They came together with diverse and complex backgrounds and musical influences. Initially the band was supposed to have a vocalist, but he didn't show up at the recording sessions. Beyond the Visible Light was recorded in 5 days and is a adventure with many colors and textures. They show some influences from many bands of the 70's Prog Rock scene with some intrusion in the Jazz Rock genre. Their debut "Beyond the Visible" Light was released in 2014 and is an adventurous listening journey with many colors and textures. In 2015 they released "Fantasy Absent Reason" (vinyl) continuing on the path of sonic textures and soundscapes. Together they have a common goal; to create and perform powerful, colorful, interesting and sonically descriptive music, engaging and pushing forward on the musical journey.

The band has released a live cd in 2018 containing tracks from the first 2 albums and new tracks for a future release. The live cd will also be release in dvd format later this year.

Bio by rdtprog updated by Chris Malmgren

OVRFWRD Videos (YouTube and more)


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Buy OVRFWRD Music


Blurring the Lines a Democracy ManifestBlurring the Lines a Democracy Manifest
CD Baby 2018
$13.82
Beyond the Visible LightBeyond the Visible Light
CD Baby 2016
$9.96
$19.55 (used)
Fantasy Absent ReasonFantasy Absent Reason
CD Baby 2015
$12.41

More places to buy OVRFWRD music online Buy OVRFWRD & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

OVRFWRD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

OVRFWRD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.64 | 18 ratings
Beyond The Visible Light
2014
3.77 | 26 ratings
Fantasy Absent Reason
2015
4.11 | 141 ratings
Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy Manifest
2018

OVRFWRD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.44 | 9 ratings
Occupations of Uninhabited Space
2018

OVRFWRD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.00 | 1 ratings
Occupations of Uninhabited Space
2019

OVRFWRD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

OVRFWRD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

OVRFWRD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Occupations of Uninhabited Space by OVRFWRD album cover DVD/Video, 2019
4.00 | 1 ratings

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Occupations of Uninhabited Space
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

— First review of this album —
4 stars The first BluRay concert disc from the suddenly very busy Minneapolis quarter OVRFWRD is a companion piece to their 2018 soundtrack album...or is it the other way around? Both document the same event: an exciting live-in-the-studio sampler of hard-hitting, heavy yet nuanced music drawn from the band's first three studio albums, including their recent "Blurring the Lines...A Democracy Manifest", a top-ten ProgArchives release of the year.

By now the group shouldn't need an introduction, having established itself as one of the most authentic and thrilling instrumental acts of the last decade, updating the guitar-and-keyboard sound of Progressive Rock's golden age without a trace of rose-colored nostalgia. The music in this set, as heard on the earlier soundtrack CD, has already been summarized elsewhere in these pages (by too few reviewers, at this date). The added visual dimension is the primary attraction here, allowing viewers privileged access to their own private OVRFWRD gig.

Clearly some serious thought went into the project, and how best to integrate the cameras into the performance with minimal interference. The discreet photography avoids all the sins of other concert films: full-facial close-ups that hide the actual musicianship; epileptic attention-deficit editing, and so forth. Here, the many cameras were set at a respectful distance from the action: some unmanned and stationary, others operated with unobtrusive zooms and panning to capture every riff and rim shot.

No director is credited, but I have to applaud the decision not to indulge in any trendy, distracting visual hype, outside of a few dramatic (and very cool) fixed overhead shots of Rikki Davenport's drum kit and Chris Malmgren's elaborate keyboard set-up. There's no self-conscious playing to the cameras; no rock star strutting or posing; and very little between-song banter. What we see instead is something more genuine: four ace players presenting their music as the star of the show, and serving that aim in dynamic supporting roles. The music itself is complex, assertive, and often loud enough to rattle the studio walls. But even at its most aggressive (as in the cover of Iron Maiden's "Genghis Khan"), you might be amazed at how effortless it appears: as always the hallmark of true musicians.

In all, quite a handsome package...although I should admit I was only able to stream a preview of the disc, on a small 20-inch monitor with crummy desktop speakers. Watching the full BluRay, in high-def video and on a good sound system, would be a completely different and no doubt stunning experience.

(Consumer addendum: The video set-list differs slightly from the compact disc soundtrack, adding the song "Usul" but shifting "Brother Jack Upduff" to play over the end credits)

 Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy  Manifest by OVRFWRD album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 141 ratings

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Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy Manifest
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by Kjarks

5 stars This band continues to impress me, record after record, with its virtuosity and millimetric precision of the structure of its compositions. In this opus, these brilliant musicians have chosen to set up more concise pieces than on their previous records. Although I have a predilection for epics, this new option of the group does not disappoint me at all. On the contrary, while exploring the same paths as in their previous opus, the shorter format of the pieces gives them an immediate force that hits the mark directly. So much so that this record is their best in my eyes.

I just have on regret since the beginning : why have they chosen and kept a name that is impossible to memorize ?

 Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy  Manifest by OVRFWRD album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 141 ratings

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Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy Manifest
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars These boys know how to embellish two-, three- and four-chord blues rock chord progressions with enough jam-band-like instrumental flourishes, to bely the simplicity of the compositions. The musicians are all proficient at their instruments, the sound choices and effects all very accurate duplications of those from classic prog, psychedelia, and jazz fusion, and the weaves all full and feeling complete, but there is again this stark simplicity to each composition that I find difficult to ignore. It is especially obvious through and with the predominance of straight time signatures. I feel as if I'm listening to DAAL, QUANTUM FANTAY, SAMSARA BLUES EXPERIMENT, and early KING CRIMSON.

1. "Wretch" (7:13) is one of the strongest songs on the album, sounding like QUANTUM FANTAY at their best. (9/10)

2. "Return to Splendor" (5:55) has a driving, jamming SAMSARA BLUES EXPERIMENT start and feel to it until the soft DAAL-like piano-based section in the fourth minute. Quite pretty?the bass lines and electric guitar arpeggi are especially engaging. At 4:40 chunky DAAL guitar power chords (two chords) shift the music back to the insistence of the opening. (8.75/10)

3. "Kilauea" (1:31) opens as a solo acoustic guitar piece before the guitar is trebled in tracks 40 seconds in. (4/5)

4. "The Trapper's Daughter" (4:13) opens with IQ-like raunchy synth which is soon joined by John Bonham "When the Levee Breaks"-sounding drumming before organ and rest of band fills the soundscape. Adrian Belew-like guitar screams and screeches enter around 1:55 but then become buried in the rest of the sonic barrage. But then a soft, cinematic reprieve starts and gradually morphs into a three-chord acoustic guitar duet to the end. Interesting. (8.5/10)

5. ""Forbidden Valley Opiate" (4:46) opens with solid drum play and Dick-Dale-like guitar riffing before filling out to be a song that could come straight from QUANTUM FANTAY's 2010 album "Bridges of Kukuriku." Another mid-song acoustic slowdown occurs in the third minute, but then proceeds to alternate with the driving two-chord progression that the song first established in the first minute. In the fourth minute the two sections kind of meld as the wah-ed lead guitar jumps into the fore and stays there till song's end. (8.75/10)

6. "Cosmic Pillow" (8:06) opens with a solo sitar before a few sparsely spaced single piano notes join in around 0:40. The duet continues as both instruments gradually embellish and augment their separate patterns with little flourishes, chords, and runs. At 2:18 the piano enters into a more domineering pattern and is joined by tabla. Talented dudes! But the strangest thing then occurs: at the four minute mark when electric bass and electric guitar enter, the whole song changes, instrumental foundation, mood, sound, everything. Gone are sitar, tabla, and any echoes of Indian sounds, exchanged for heavy four-chord bluesy prog rock. In the sixth minute, the musical structure tries on a kind of KING CRIMSON sound with angular guitar chords and arpeggi and wild saxophone runs. Impressive imitation but, again, it is based in such simplicity! (8.5/10)

7. "Another Afterthought" (3:54) is the first of the album's songs in which the band enters into the realm of 70s instrumental Jazz Rock?here using an instrumental sound palette quite similar to bands like NARADA MICHAEL WALDEN, LARRY CARLTON, and even Belgium's MINIMAL COMPACT. The song is interesting?even pretty in many places. (9/10)

8. "Handful of Infinity" (3:09) trying on the folk-tinged PAT METHENY GROUP style, we have a two-chord verse structure as the foundation over which electric guitar, Patrick Moraz-like synth, and piano get some solo time. The segue into more delicate territory at 2:00 is interesting, and then we finish with the same acoustic guitar-based jazz-rock opening. (8.75/10)

9. "Taiga" (4:01) opens like it's going to explode into a DEAD CAN DANCE song, but then, instead, becomes more of an ambient VANGELIS "Antarctica" thing before single chord piano and simple bass line bounce repetitively while synth twinkles and poppies its percussive sounds. A chamber strings addition in the third minute proceeds a rich, cinematic section over which bass nd electric guitar interplay. Good song. (8.75/10)

10. "Mother Tongue" (7:15) opens with a band and a runaway pace with many bridges of tempo shifts and pregnant pauses strung together while drums and organ crash away. Electric guitar becomes more integrated into the weave than anticipated, but then morphs into an interesting due to the arrival of acoustic guitar in lead position, but then heaviness crashes back in to take the dominating style. But no! A slower, more spacious psychedelia foundation is created allowing the blues Hendrix-like lead guitar to float and flail, dance and fly all over the fast-panning soundscape. This song is all over the place! Does it work? Drumming, bass play, and piano are very cool in their support of the Hendrix imitator. Definitely a bluesy jam band-like song. The four-chord repetition to the end is an unusual way to draw the song to a close. (9/10)

11. "Wretch Reprise" (1:32) faded in, faded out. Must have been a solo section from an alternate or longer version of the album's opener. I am SO familiar with this style of creating songs! (3.5/5)

12. "Usul" (4:48) is the most obviously KING CRIMSON-esque song on the album, "Red" era, but, other than the wonderful drumming on display, ultimately fails to maintain its beguilement. (8.5/10)

Again, these band members, one and all, are masters of taking very simple constructs and using the collective embellishments from their familiar instruments to weave together some very nice and deceptively layered song tapestries. There are more frequent jam-band type of song developments than complex Crimsonian constructs?though, again, each of the individual musicians are quite proficient at their instruments. Their gift, so far, lies in masterfully mounting a collective attack slowly but surely, building as one to eventually create the full sounds and impressive concotions that they have.

Four stars; a wonderful addition to any prog lover's music collection; an impressive collection of a variety of styles familiar to any prog lover from the progressive rock musics of the 1970s.

 Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy  Manifest by OVRFWRD album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 141 ratings

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Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy Manifest
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

5 stars Due to one reason or another I have fallen behind on my reviewing from where I like to be, and when this started playing in the car the other day I initially had to take a step back and work out who it was, and where it had come from. I had forgotten that keyboard player Chris Malmgren had sent it to me, as this just doesn't sound like a self-release and why they haven't been picked up by a major label is just beyond me. When it comes to instrumental progressive rock, there are few who put it together as strongly as Ovrfwd, who continue to drive a fusion of heavy rock and progressive rock in a way only they can. Drummer Rikki Davenport is obviously an octopus, while bassist Kyle Lund decided a long time ago that there is no reason why he can't play a lead part as well as providing support. Then you have keyboard player Chris Malmgreen who may be just playing delicate, emotional piano (listen to the beginning of 'Cosmic Pillow' as an example), or blasting banks of keyboards and then there is Mark Ilaug who can be deft and precise, or shredding and dynamic, whatever is right at that moment in time.

The guys don't have a singer, as there is just no room at all inside their music for someone to provide vocals. But, instead of meandering meaningless wanderings these guys provide concise and controlled songs without words, music that transports the listener (such as the use of sitar on the aforementioned song). Powerful and heavy when it needs to me, there is also a great deal of delicacy, and clever arrangements which allow for plenty of space within the layers so that all can be easily heard and understood. This is truly progressive, with no room for navel gazing as the guys provide complex and complicated music which is fully accessible the first time it is played and just keeps getting better on repeat. Superb.

 Occupations of Uninhabited Space by OVRFWRD album cover Live, 2018
4.44 | 9 ratings

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Occupations of Uninhabited Space
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Heavy Prog quartet with a disdain for vowels broke a three-year silence with this interim project: part compilation; part sneak preview; and in large part a warm-up (hopefully) for actual concert dates.

Technically it's a live album, albeit performed in the controlled environment of a recording studio, over a whirlwind two-day session in early August of 2017. The setlist included thrilling interpretations of older tracks off the band's first two (highly recommended) efforts, plus a test-run of two stunning numbers from their forthcoming album "Blurring the Lines (A Democracy Manifest)". The wild-card of the bunch is an energetic update of the 1981 Iron Maiden instrumental "Genghis Khan", offering a signpost for newcomers to one of the band's many influences (mid-70's King Crimson is another obvious taproot). A quick, personal side-note: I've never been a fan of Iron Maiden, but after hearing this muscular cover maybe I should be...

Revisiting their own early repertoire was a smart idea, especially after such a long absence. Like a pair of snug shoes that fit more comfortably over time, the older material played here has improved with age, and benefits greatly from the dynamic spontaneity of a live performance, even in an Uninhabited Space without an authentic audience. Because let's face it, fellow Progheads: overdubs are for pussies. The true test of any real musician has always been an ability to deliver the goods without the safety net of cosmetic editing, and Ovrfwrd ace that exam with the easy confidence of seasoned professionals.

The effort is also being sold as a 'soundtrack' album: these live sessions were filmed, and according to the Ovrfwrd website a DVD will be on the market before the end of 2018 (a fast-approaching deadline by the way, guys...) Video samples have already appeared YouTube, so I will resist further comment until the official release, except to note the monster chops of all four players, obvious even in the audio version here.

It might be only a stop-gap release between studio albums, but this set accomplishes two vital goals: it succeeds is reestablishing Ovrfwrd as a musical force to be reckoned with, and (perhaps more importantly) shows what a powerhouse live act they are. All the music, old and new, was made stronger than ever in the mock-concert setting, removing any doubt that the quartet is one of the more exciting instrumental outfits to emerge this decade.

 Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy  Manifest by OVRFWRD album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 141 ratings

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Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy Manifest
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars I can't stand it any longer. At first, quite obvious, this fairly unspeakable band name strikes, puzzles every time, me at least. Just something like 'Overforward' maybe? Anyhow, come what may, as announced lately, the US quartet are offering a new manifest due to this album. Where they are blurring the lines between diverse genres again with ease. While being completely instrumental lyrics aren't available in consequence. The very nice cover illustration at least will express some touch with nature. And so, if there is any concept intended behind that ever, at least it may be managing another balancing act. Which would be to deliver new music that is unpredictable and accessible at once.

Thus, while listening, and considering the album title, who really will be up to doubt, that this is based on a democratic foundation? Without exception the musicianship is flawless over the course. Instrumental impact and compositional aspect obviously enjoy equal rights regarding all members. Not long ago they released the live in the studio session 'Occupations Of Uninhabited Space', retrospective and looking ahead both, as they also have put some forward-looking teaser on that album. Mother Tongue appears to be one exemplar, but provided in a new outfit on this occasion, yeah! And now, of course, the unavoidable question ... which is the better one, heh? Can't say, don't know, sorry, pragmatically seen I should prefer the more extended one, hah!

Whatever, the fabulous jamming middle part features a symbiosis of jazz/fusion and space rock attitude, marks an album highlight in any case. This is a quite eclectic one hour show, comes with creativity, definitely running against prog mainstream boredom. Equipped with a bunch of twists and turns it's really hard to analyze and describe. One track title, mentioning a trappers daughter, once provoked me to wonder if they ever have thought about recording a song or two with a singer anyway. Probably a new further challenge, who knows. Not an easy task in the end, because this music is of a complex nature, regularly contradictive to harmonies, choruses, refrains aso.

I rather should avoid to highlight any band member, but Chris Malmgren's enchanting piano lines are remarkable all over the course, exemplarily to mention on the fantastic opener Wretch. There's some fine symphonic bombast feel given within Another Afterthought. Furthermore the mysterious Cosmic Pillow extends the guitar range with a sitar and some King Crimson reminiscence. If you should be longing for a proper comparisn, the band Djam Karet will come into mind occasionally. 'Blurring The Lines' is absolutely recommended, prog purists should pay attention, so much to explore. 4.5 stars as for the rating so far.

 Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy  Manifest by OVRFWRD album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 141 ratings

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Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy Manifest
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by Neu!mann
Prog Reviewer

5 stars After releasing the assertive live-in-the-studio teaser "Occupations of Uninhabited Space" only six months earlier, the Minneapolis quartet OVRFWRD completes what has to be the most impressive one-two punch of 2018 with their long awaited third album, in the process cementing a (so far) low radar reputation as one of the best and most authentically progressive bands at work today.

From the eye-catching cover art to the inscrutable title to the undeniable depth and variety of the music itself, this is stunning stuff: old-school instrumental Prog as it used to be practiced, by four ace players very much aware of their shared musical heritage. On their Facebook page the band cites the influence of Pink Floyd, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Iron Maiden, Rush, Yes, Opeth, Joni Mitchell (!), and King Crimson, and believe it or not all of the above are discernable in the new album. But this is hardly an ensemble stuck on a retrograde treadmill: the same list of influences ends with an intriguing "TBD..."

In truth the only thing OVRFWRD actually borrows from the past is a legacy of boundless creativity. Their music is hard to categorize, which ought to be true (but usually isn't) for any band flying the Progressive Rock banner. Heavy, intense, lyrical, sensitive, and thrilling are a few words that immediately spring to mind at first exposure. I dare any self-respecting Proghead not to respond to the attention-grabbing album opener "Wretch", with its gut-punching rhythms and near-symphonic instrumental chorus (a brief "Reprise" later in the album acts more like an interlude excised from the earlier track but too good to waste).

The same challenge also applies to the gentle acoustic beauty of "Kilauea", an oasis of calm before the macho chords powering "The Trapper's Daughter". Or the Kick-Muck Ozric Tentacles intensity of "Forbidden Valley Opiate", one of two tracks previewed on the "Uninhibited Space" collection. Elsewhere the title "Cosmic Pillow" may have been intended as a joke: note the ethereal faux-'60s sitars and tabla, and the Roedelius-like simplicity of Chris Malmgren's acoustic piano accents, bathed in interplanetary echo. But it successfully conjures an age of outer-atmospheric exploration better than most dedicated Space Rock bands, then or now.

For this session OVRFWRD seems to have shed the few remaining inhibitions that might have lingered over their previous two studio albums. The band is playing with a greater sense of space and freedom, but at the same time have bonded tighter and harder than ever into a single musical unit. Solo turns are few, and are always heard within a larger group context: a possible explanation of the "Democracy Manifest" in the album's title. Chris Malmgren's nuanced keyboard work; Mark Ilaug's fiery lead guitar; and a vigorous rhythm section with stamina to spare: these guys function like an eight-armed beast controlled by one alert, curious, and very confident brain.

I'm always hesitant to award a new album five immediate stars: masterpieces need to first stand the test of time. But maybe this effort has been there and done that already, even before its official release. After all: if the same music had been around 40 years ago (and it might have been, if only more bands at the time had resisted commercial trends and played to their strengths) the album would likely be remembered today as a classic...so why wait?

 Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy  Manifest by OVRFWRD album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.11 | 141 ratings

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Blurring The Lines ... A Democracy Manifest
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy / RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

5 stars The band continues to experiment its instrumental music by exploring different kinds of styles from Progressive Rock, Jazz Rock, world music and classical. In the same song, you can expect a surprising twist around the corner, a special groove. They can cover different moods from the more heavier passages to the light ones using piano and sitar and not only modern instruments. Often compared to King Crimson, that is mostly accurate for the rhythm section which is similar to the 90's King Crimson than for the guitar style of playing. There are so many highlights in this 50 minutes plus album that it would be a waste of time to analyze every song, you can't skip a song, it will keep your focus from the beginning to the end. For those who enjoy an eclectic or fusion kind of heavy prog and don't mind the absence of vocals. Why ruined this beautiful music with vocals!
 Occupations of Uninhabited Space by OVRFWRD album cover Live, 2018
4.44 | 9 ratings

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Occupations of Uninhabited Space
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Should this be noted as a live album, remake, best-of collection, or what? It doesn't matter in the end. During one weekend session, taking place at the Pachyderm Studio, they are performing carefully selected songs from their first two albums, which were originally released around the years 2014 and 2015. Though not exclusively. On top the quartet delivers three previously unreleased recordings which are intended to appear on the upcoming third studio album. This certainly makes curious. And indeed, first of all, the whole thing sounds completely rounded. A special snapshot, based on the same team spirit, when considering the short-timed circumstances.

While being completely instrumental in the making, those eight songs are showing a balanced relationship of composition and improvisation overall. First one and newbie Mother Tongue then explicitly proves what I mean. A main frame, rich in variety, shines while coming along with a clever space jam in between. Appealing, piano and electric guitar are perfectly complementing. Taken from the debut album 'Beyond the Visible Light' next one Raviji sounds matured concerning the fine-tuning. They are able to hold up this high level towards the finale. What basically means the songs constantly are featuring a rather complex fundament, instrumental virtuosity and enough catchy moments. Highly recommended.

 Occupations of Uninhabited Space by OVRFWRD album cover Live, 2018
4.44 | 9 ratings

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Occupations of Uninhabited Space
Ovrfwrd Heavy Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

5 stars When keyboard player Chris Malmgren contacted me to let him know that Ovrfwrd were releasing a new album, recorded live in the studio, I was definitely interested. Recorded and filmed live at Pachyderm Studios in Cannon Falls, MN (Nirvana, Live, PJ Harvey, Soul Asylum) on August 5th and 6th, 2017 it features music from the first two albums ('Beyond the Visible Light', 2015, and 'Fantasy Absent Reason' from 2016) as well as new unreleased music for an album they are currently working on. Chris, along with Rikki Davenport (drums), Mark Ilaug (guitar) and Kyle Lund (bass) have producing some of the best instrumental progressive rock music for a few years now, and it is incredibly to realise that this a live recording as they definitely nail it.

Influence-wise I have previously stated that they combine the likes of King Crimson and Discipline in their music, and give that much of this is taken from their first two albums there is no surprise that this is still the case, but there are times when one thinks that Spock's Beard have had a part to play, or Arena, or Dialeto, while there are times when they bring in fusion and make it centre stage. There is a great deal going on, but the guys never lose focus and there is no room for any meandering as the intent is always clear and there is just no room at all for any vocals! Al four play to their strengths, and while Mark and Chris often are taking the melody leads, the contra-melodies from Kyle and the aggressive attack from Rikki all make the music what it is.

All in all this is an incredibly intense and enjoyable progressive rock album, one that I have no hesitation at all in highly recommending to anyone who enjoys this style of music. I suggest you play the video for 'Unitopia Planitia' and then buy the album.

Thanks to rdtprog for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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