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Tony Banks or Rick Wakeman

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Topic: Tony Banks or Rick Wakeman
Posted By: brainstormer
Subject: Tony Banks or Rick Wakeman
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 18:43
I realize Banks doesn't have a huge solo album career, but both
are obvious responsible for much.  


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Replies:
Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 18:52
tone e

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Posted By: Mr. Mustard
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 19:03
Technically and virtuosically speaking Wakeman probably has the edge. But in my opinion Banks was a MUCH better composer and played more tastefully. Some of Yes's best work wasn't even written by Wakeman (Relayer, Yes Album). I don't really care for either's solo work so I can't really compare.

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Posted By: smartpatrol
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 19:13
True; Rick is a bit more show-offy whereas Tony is more about what fits the best

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Posted By: Horizons
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 19:17
Originally posted by Mr. Mustard Mr. Mustard wrote:

Technically and virtuosically speaking Wakeman probably has the edge. But in my opinion Banks was a MUCH better composer and played more tastefully. Some of Yes's best work wasn't even written by Wakeman (Relayer, Yes Album). I don't really care for either's solo work so I can't really compare.

Yea this 


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Posted By: Floyd Steely
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 19:18
Wakeman cuz I like his books.


Posted By: Neo-Romantic
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 19:22
Tony Banks is my favorite keyboardist. I love his playing. I've never been too keen on Wakeman. Patrick Moraz is my favorite Yes keyboardist. Only took one album for him to effectively displace Wakeman in my book.


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 19:23
Wakeman, easily, both with Yes and solo. Though of course, Tony is really cool too.


Posted By: dr wu23
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 19:49
Tough choice for me.....I like their work in both bands.
Wakeman for solo. 


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Haquin


Posted By: twosteves
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 20:49
Banks is my favorite overall prog keyboardist, always tasteful---so Tony--but Rick did some great solo's and really great--interesting work on Fragile, CTTE and GFTO.


Posted By: brainstormer
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 21:08
I find Banks interesting and able to create some beautiful melodies but his music doesn't have the power for me of Wakeman's.   Esp Six Wives and Criminal Record, and Rick's contributions to Yes are pretty much all his own, I'm sure.   I find many other treasures also in Wakeman's solo output.   Not sure how much of the piano writing itself of Morning Has Broken was original from Rick, but that's a pretty major achievement, as well.  

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Robert Pearson
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Posted By: fudgenuts64
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 23:02
Tony Banks, for certain.

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Posted By: Progosopher
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 23:18
Banks is clearly the better songwriter and composer, and a great keyboardist, but Wakeman has such grace and panache in his playing I just have to give him my vote.

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Posted By: octopus-4
Date Posted: May 27 2013 at 23:44
Wakeman, of course.

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Curiosity killed a cat, Schroedinger only half.


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 00:12
Wakeman is definately more technical, but Banks really knows how to just make a song sound flat out great!! Sometimes the simple approach really works.

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Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 00:20
Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Wakeman, easily, both with Yes and solo. Though of course, Tony is really cool too.
My thoughts too, exactly !


Posted By: Eria Tarka
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 00:39
Mr. Banks


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 01:40
Depends from what perspective you are looking

Technical - very close run thing ,didn't Keith Emerson say Banks was the best?

Composition - Six Wives is amazing but is to Rick what The Planets Suite is to Holst. I do like Criminal Record and other Wakemen albums but none of them are masterpeices like Six Wives. Banks has never recorded a bravura work such as that

Working within a band - Banks easily. well he was 'Mr Genesis'. Wakeman joined an established band and was the cherry on top of the icing on top of the cake. Suddenly Yes could challenge ELP on their own ground.

Live performance - Banks nails it every time but rarely varies from pre-rehearsed solos. Could phone in his performance most of the time. Wakeman is prepared to improvise much like Emerson.

I make it a 2-2- drawSmile



Posted By: Hercules
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 03:52
In the band context, Banks. He's technically very good and he fits into the band better than Wakeman.
 
Solo work; Wakeman did one brilliant album then lost it, but Banks did nothing of real merit.
 
Overall, Banks.


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Posted By: Svetonio
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 03:54
Tony Banks gets my vote!


Posted By: antonyus
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 04:24
old grumpy Rick !


Posted By: Moogtron III
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 04:34
I like them both, but I choose Tony. He's such a good composer, and though no virtuoso, the notes he uses are often quite effective. I like most of his solo albums too.

Not too crazy about quite some compositions I heard from Rick. I suppose he's a better player than composer, but Journey and Criminal Record have some outstanding compositions. He's a wonderful player overall.

But I choose Tony.



Posted By: Gandalff
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 05:09
Wake, man!Wink

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o menel aglar elenath!
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nef aear, sí nef aearon!



Posted By: Mormegil
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 07:00
Overall, Banks has the win. But you can't beat Wakeman's "flair"!

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Posted By: Gerinski
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 07:33
Banks for me, he has more subtle musicality, his choices for shifting keys and scales are wonderful. All my respect to grumpy Rick in any case!


Posted By: Manuel
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 07:34
This is very close for me, since I enjoy both of them a lot. Quite different styles, but excellent overall, so it's quite hard to make a choice. No vote. 


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 07:43
Wakeman is a far better and talented keyboard player. I choose Sir Rick.

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Posted By: Blacksword
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 07:50
Banks.

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Posted By: memowakeman
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 10:03
Rick Wakeman, of course.

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Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 11:42
Originally posted by Neo-Romantic Neo-Romantic wrote:

I've never been too keen on Wakeman. Patrick Moraz is my favorite Yes keyboardist. Only took one album for him to effectively displace Wakeman in my book.
^ this

This is a fascinating question because in many ways, they're opposites:

1)  Banks is more of a meat-and-potatos player who supports the song
      Wakeman is better from a technical standpoint and more flash
2)  Banks seemed to favor organ and polysynth
      Wakeman favored piano
3)  Banks' solo's were usually played on an ARP Pro Soloist
      Wakeman favored the Mini-Moog
4)  Wakeman is a hilarious guy you'd want to hang out with
      Banks is an upper class twit, but I voted for him anyway Wink



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Posted By: digdug
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 12:02
Six Wives of Rick

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Prog On!


Posted By: Wanorak
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:08
Personally, I can't stand most of Wakeman's solo albums; they are often quite cheesy and he can't select a good vocalist to save his life(IMO)!!

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Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:43
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:


Originally posted by Neo-Romantic Neo-Romantic wrote:

I've never been too keen on Wakeman. Patrick Moraz is my favorite Yes keyboardist. Only took one album for him to effectively displace Wakeman in my book.


^ this
<span style="line-height: 1.2;"></span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">This is a fascinating question because in many ways, they're opposites:</span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;"></span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">1)  Banks is more of a meat-and-potatos player who supports the song</span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">      Wakeman is better from a technical standpoint and more flash</span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">2)  Banks seemed to favor organ and polysynth</span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">      Wakeman favored piano</span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">3)  Banks' solo's were usually played on an ARP Pro Soloist</span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">      Wakeman favored the Mini-Moog</span>
<span style="line-height: 1.2;">4)  </span><span style="line-height: 1.2;">Wakeman is a hilarious guy you'd want to hang out with</span>
      <span style="line-height: 1.2;">Banks is an upper class twit, but I voted for him anyway Wink</span>




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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: octopus-4
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 13:58
I should have written something about fanboys on another thread LOL

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Curiosity killed a cat, Schroedinger only half.


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 14:13
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Depends from what perspective you are looking
Technical - very close run thing ,didn't Keith Emerson say Banks was the best?
Composition - Six Wives is amazing but is to Rick what The Planets Suite is to Holst. I do like Criminal Record and other Wakemen albums but none of them are masterpeices like Six Wives. Banks has never recorded a bravura work such as that
Working within a band - Banks easily. well he was 'Mr Genesis'. Wakeman joined an established band and was the cherry on top of the icing on top of the cake. Suddenly Yes could challenge ELP on their own ground.
Live performance - Banks nails it every time but rarely varies from pre-rehearsed solos. Could phone in his performance most of the time. Wakeman is prepared to improvise much like Emerson.
I make it a 2-2- drawSmile


I do like Wakeman's ability to improvise, or make some twists to the songs he is playing, adding something and so on, just like the extra keyboard solo he added to "Starship Trooper" on Keys to Ascension... he just made the Wurm section his own as much as it's Howe's; and of course, he would do this kind of things with his own songs on his own shows. Another nice thing about him, is that he usually plays his songs with the musicians he has available, without using recordings to fill out the sound, which might have been a temptation with songs from albums such as Journey and Arthur that use lots of orchestrations and choirs, and really, those songs sound usually sound perfect anyway.


Posted By: brainstormer
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 15:10
Hey, we need to post this poll over at Yesworld....

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Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 15:40
If it counts for anything, I prefer Rick's 'Silent Nights' over Banks' 'A Curious Feeling'.............Confused


Posted By: akamaisondufromage
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 16:16
Rick is funnier

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Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 16:27
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Live performance - Banks nails it every time but rarely varies from pre-rehearsed solos. Could phone in his performance most of the time. Wakeman is prepared to improvise much like Emerson.


Good point.  Banks is my favourite lead synthesizer player.  Emo & Wakeman could improvise circles around him but Banks' solos are well thought out mini-compositions.  The best example I've found is the synth solo from "In The Cage".  I learned to play it along with the backing organ chords a few months ago and it's a master class in how to build a solo melody on top of a harmonic background.  Genius.


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Posted By: Josef_K
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 18:56
Rick Wakeman was a favorite of mine for some time but I really keep discovering how much I've overrated him... He is a great player and sometimes even a good composer (I love the "Arthur" album) and of course his playing on my all-time favorite album Tales from Topographic Oceans is beyond stunning. Still I can't help how easy he was replaced by Patrick Moraz for me, he really wasn't that essential for the Yes sound as it seemed while he was in the band. 

Tony Banks is more of a composer and less of a player, which I guess I like more because I think of myself that way. And this is one hell of a composer, the crimson king mentioned the In the Cage solo, I'd like to add one of my all-time favorite songs "The Lamia" to the list of masterful Banks compositions, of course among many others (Watcher of the Skies intro anyone?). So yeah, Banks really is more interesting as a whole when compared to Wakeman, he seems to connect with his own music on a deeper level than Wakeman does, at least in a way more similar with how I connect with my music. So in the end I'd vote for Banks I guess.


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Leave the past to burn,
At least that's been his own

- Peter Hammill


Posted By: Barbu
Date Posted: May 28 2013 at 19:59
Mister Banks

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Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 01:17
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Live performance - Banks nails it every time but rarely varies from pre-rehearsed solos. Could phone in his performance most of the time. Wakeman is prepared to improvise much like Emerson.


Good point.  Banks is my favourite lead synthesizer player.  Emo & Wakeman could improvise circles around him but Banks' solos are well thought out mini-compositions.  The best example I've found is the synth solo from "In The Cage".  I learned to play it along with the backing organ chords a few months ago and it's a master class in how to build a solo melody on top of a harmonic background.  Genius.

The solo on the apocalypse section is probably his pinnacle. How often has that been ripped off by neo prog bands??!
Banks is a genius as a composer really. Wakeman though was the ultimate prog keyboard player and a master on synth, hammond,church organ, mellotron and piano.  Still not sure who I want to vote for.. this is just way too tough.


Posted By: Moogtron III
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 01:44
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Live performance - Banks nails it every time but rarely varies from pre-rehearsed solos. Could phone in his performance most of the time. Wakeman is prepared to improvise much like Emerson.


Good point.  Banks is my favourite lead synthesizer player.  Emo & Wakeman could improvise circles around him but Banks' solos are well thought out mini-compositions.  The best example I've found is the synth solo from "In The Cage".  I learned to play it along with the backing organ chords a few months ago and it's a master class in how to build a solo melody on top of a harmonic background.  Genius.

The solo on the apocalypse section is probably his pinnacle. How often has that been ripped off by neo prog bands??!
Banks is a genius as a composer really. Wakeman though was the ultimate prog keyboard player and a master on synth, hammond,church organ, mellotron and piano.  Still not sure who I want to vote for.. this is just way too tough.

It depends on what you think is most important, I suppose: composition vs. playing. That's a personal choice. I chose Banks myself because for me good compositions comes first.
(Emerson was both a brilliant composer and a brilliant player)


Posted By: sukmytoe
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 02:02
I love the Genesis early period a lot more than I do the Yes earlier period (except for the Relayer album which is up there with the best - and Wakeman wasn't involved with Relayer). Looking at both artists I have to go with Rick Wakeman and my resoning for that is comparrison between Banks and Wakeman solo efforts. Banks never did anything like the Journey to the Centre of the Earth album or anything that could compare to any of the early Wakeman albums in scope or in ability. I also wonder how much of what Banks is credited with in Genesis inspiration wise came from him as opposed to how much came from the other Genesis members - looking at his solo albums which are uninspired for the main part I can guess at the answer to that. I also wonder, after watching a large number of interviews of the Genesis band members, who was ultimately responsible for the direction which Genesis took with their later output - many "blame" Collins for what happened however I think that Banks was the "culprit" and not Collins. I lay the demise of the old, loved, sound of Genesis when they changed direction fully on Banks's doorstep as I also lay the "blame" for the departure of Gabriel and then Hackett.


Posted By: Slartibartfast
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 04:06
All around I have to give it to Rick as Banks has only done one good solo album.

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Posted By: dr prog
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 04:36
Banks isn't up there with my fave keyboardist's. Maybe it's because I find genesis a bit dainty and odd. Some weird compositions and lyrics which just feel a bit off centre to me

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Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 13:55
Originally posted by Moogtron III Moogtron III wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

Live performance - Banks nails it every time but rarely varies from pre-rehearsed solos. Could phone in his performance most of the time. Wakeman is prepared to improvise much like Emerson.


Good point.  Banks is my favourite lead synthesizer player.  Emo & Wakeman could improvise circles around him but Banks' solos are well thought out mini-compositions.  The best example I've found is the synth solo from "In The Cage".  I learned to play it along with the backing organ chords a few months ago and it's a master class in how to build a solo melody on top of a harmonic background.  Genius.

The solo on the apocalypse section is probably his pinnacle. How often has that been ripped off by neo prog bands??!
Banks is a genius as a composer really. Wakeman though was the ultimate prog keyboard player and a master on synth, hammond,church organ, mellotron and piano.  Still not sure who I want to vote for.. this is just way too tough.

It depends on what you think is most important, I suppose: composition vs. playing. That's a personal choice. I chose Banks myself because for me good compositions comes first.
(Emerson was both a brilliant composer and a brilliant player)

Agree on Emerson although I think he was able to avoid just sticking anything out for the sake of it like Rick seems to have done over the years. Wakeman has something like 100+ solo albums releases which is plain madness imo. Even Vangelis is only up to 30 oddLOL
But that Six Wives album throws a major spanner into the works. Emerson nor Banks ever matched that for sheer nail on the head brilliance but Rick could never quite follow it in my mind. It was perhaps just too good.

I have to ask myself who has given me the most pleasure and raised a smile over the years. I guess has to be Rick and also I prefer early Yes (pre Relayer) to early Genesis. So my vote is for King Rick.


Posted By: NickHall
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 15:47
Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.


Posted By: Smurph
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 16:14
Wakeman on technical ability and his solo work.

BUT... I like Banks more because he does some dang good melodic work and compositions. :D


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wtf


Posted By: akaBona
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 17:07
RW


Posted By: verslibre
Date Posted: May 29 2013 at 17:59
Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

But that Six Wives album throws a major spanner into the works. Emerson nor Banks ever matched that for sheer nail on the head brilliance but Rick could never quite follow it in my mind. It was perhaps just too good.
 
 
Also voted for Rick. I do think Rick matched Six Wives with Criminal Record. Both are stupendous forays into keyboard-propelled instrumental prog. I consider both to be essential recordings even for Wakeman-haters.
 
I think Tony is a great composer even if he doesn't match Rick's, Keith's and Patrick's technical capabilities. Tony's Soundtracks (with music from Quicksilver and Lorca & The Outlaws) shows him in a non-songwriter context apart from two great songs sung by Fish and Toyah (and one lousy song sung by somebody whose name I don't care to look up).


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Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: May 30 2013 at 01:51
Originally posted by verslibre verslibre wrote:

Originally posted by richardh richardh wrote:

But that Six Wives album throws a major spanner into the works. Emerson nor Banks ever matched that for sheer nail on the head brilliance but Rick could never quite follow it in my mind. It was perhaps just too good.
 
 
Also voted for Rick. I do think Rick matched Six Wives with Criminal Record. Both are stupendous forays into keyboard-propelled instrumental prog. I consider both to be essential recordings even for Wakeman-haters.
 
I think Tony is a great composer even if he doesn't match Rick's, Keith's and Patrick's technical capabilities. Tony's Soundtracks (with music from Quicksilver and Lorca & The Outlaws) shows him in a non-songwriter context apart from two great songs sung by Fish and Toyah (and one lousy song sung by somebody whose name I don't care to look up).

Criminal Record certainly has some great dynamics on the 'ELP tracks' (Wakeman,Squire and White) and Judas Iscariot is rather goosebumpingly wonderfull at times but on the whole it feels like an incomplete package somehow ( and you have to to ignore The Breathalyser ). However that was the closest he got to repeating the brilliance of Six Wives before financial and health issues perhaps started to overtake him.


Posted By: Chris S
Date Posted: May 30 2013 at 03:17
Banks Genesis work, A Curious Feeling and Strictly Inc, his classical releases - incredible stuff

Wakeman - Work with Strawbs ( From The Witchwood), Yes ( what can one say.....) his solo albums, 6 Wives, Journey To The Center, Knights of King Arthur, the awesome No Earthly Connection

I'd have to say they are each masters in their own way, totally different personalities


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...As I venture through the slipstream, between the viaducts in your dreams...[/COLOR]


Posted By: brainstormer
Date Posted: May 30 2013 at 14:17
Yes, the more I look at this poll, the more I realize it's not ever to say one is good and one is bad.  I am just interested in why people would do a desert island selection of either guy's work.  



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Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: May 30 2013 at 16:07
Originally posted by verslibre verslibre wrote:

 
I think Tony is a great composer even if he doesn't match Rick's, Keith's and Patrick's technical capabilities. Tony's Soundtracks (with music from Quicksilver and Lorca & The Outlaws) shows him in a non-songwriter context apart from two great songs sung by Fish and Toyah (and one lousy song sung by somebody whose name I don't care to look up).
For me, the song Fish sings on "Still" (Another Murder of a Day) is the highlight of Banks song based solo work.  I like most of "A Curious Feeling" instrumentally but have never really liked vocalist Kim Beacon's style.  Too bad Fish couldn't have sung on that album too Wink


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Posted By: Chris S
Date Posted: May 30 2013 at 18:29
The votes speak volume 30/30. Both as good as each other from PA members so far

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Posted By: Ivan_Melgar_M
Date Posted: May 30 2013 at 19:08
Tony Banks in a band

Rick Wakeman as solo artist

Bioth are in the same level for different situatiions.

Iván


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Posted By: HackettFan
Date Posted: May 30 2013 at 20:07
Tony Banks. Not just the tasty melodies, he new how to use timbre to fit both the content and the mood a song was trying to convey. Hmm..I would say the same about Hackett, actually.


Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: May 31 2013 at 06:26
Wakeman came up with that massive cascading church organ/moog section of 'Awaken' - beat that, Tony LOL


Posted By: chopper
Date Posted: May 31 2013 at 08:53
Originally posted by NickHall NickHall wrote:

Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.

I've read that Genesis used to skip the piano intro of "Firth of Fifth" because Banks couldn't play it live. I don't know whether this is true or not, although I doubt it as the keyboard player from tribute band Los Endos has no trouble playing it.

Wakeman is technically better but doesn't always pick the best keyboard sounds.

I'm going to go for Wakeman for the glorious church organ section of "Close To The Edge" and the instrumental section of "And You And I".


Posted By: Dellinger
Date Posted: May 31 2013 at 14:17
Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:


Originally posted by NickHall NickHall wrote:

Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.

I've read that Genesis used to skip the piano intro of "Firth of Fifth" because Banks couldn't play it live. I don't know whether this is true or not, although I doubt it as the keyboard player from tribute band Los Endos has no trouble playing it.
Wakeman is technically better but doesn't always pick the best keyboard sounds.
I'm going to go for Wakeman for the glorious church organ section of "Close To The Edge" and the instrumental section of "And You And I".


I had read something similar about the intro to Firth of Fifth... but I think it had more to do with him not being able to find the right sound on his keyboards in order to play that, though I'm not really sure.


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: June 01 2013 at 02:32
I saw a Genesis tribute band mess up that intro a few years back. They had to stop and go again. Obviously it's very tricky but on the flipside of the coin also shows what a great composer Banks is.


Posted By: rogerthat
Date Posted: June 01 2013 at 10:41
Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:


Originally posted by NickHall NickHall wrote:

Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.

I've read that Genesis used to skip the piano intro of "Firth of Fifth" because Banks couldn't play it live. I don't know whether this is true or not, although I doubt it as the keyboard player from tribute band Los Endos has no trouble playing it.
Wakeman is technically better but doesn't always pick the best keyboard sounds.
I'm going to go for Wakeman for the glorious church organ section of "Close To The Edge" and the instrumental section of "And You And I".


I had read something similar about the intro to Firth of Fifth... but I think it had more to do with him not being able to find the right sound on his keyboards in order to play that, though I'm not really sure.


I doubt it's because he couldn't play it because he always played the interlude anyway, which is a repetition of the intro.  Yeah, it's probably the tone or something like that. 


Posted By: infocat
Date Posted: June 01 2013 at 11:57
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:


Originally posted by NickHall NickHall wrote:

Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.

I've read that Genesis used to skip the piano intro of "Firth of Fifth" because Banks couldn't play it live. I don't know whether this is true or not, although I doubt it as the keyboard player from tribute band Los Endos has no trouble playing it.
Wakeman is technically better but doesn't always pick the best keyboard sounds.
I'm going to go for Wakeman for the glorious church organ section of "Close To The Edge" and the instrumental section of "And You And I".


I had read something similar about the intro to Firth of Fifth... but I think it had more to do with him not being able to find the right sound on his keyboards in order to play that, though I'm not really sure.


I doubt it's because he couldn't play it because he always played the interlude anyway, which is a repetition of the intro.  Yeah, it's probably the tone or something like that. 
I also heard it was the tone.

Slightly disappointed not to hear the intro at a recent Hackett show.  And I know Roger King can play it, because I've seen it on a Hackett video.


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--
Frank Swarbrick
Belief is not Truth.


Posted By: resurrection
Date Posted: June 02 2013 at 01:43
I really don't like comparisons between fine musicians, in the end, it's all down to personal taste, but if I must choose, I would say Rick, because of virtuoso technique.


Posted By: twosteves
Date Posted: June 02 2013 at 08:31
Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:


Originally posted by NickHall NickHall wrote:

Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.

I've read that Genesis used to skip the piano intro of "Firth of Fifth" because Banks couldn't play it live. I don't know whether this is true or not, although I doubt it as the keyboard player from tribute band Los Endos has no trouble playing it.
Wakeman is technically better but doesn't always pick the best keyboard sounds.
I'm going to go for Wakeman for the glorious church organ section of "Close To The Edge" and the instrumental section of "And You And I".


I had read something similar about the intro to Firth of Fifth... but I think it had more to do with him not being able to find the right sound on his keyboards in order to play that, though I'm not really sure.


I doubt it's because he couldn't play it because he always played the interlude anyway, which is a repetition of the intro.  Yeah, it's probably the tone or something like that. 

I seriously doubt it too---Hackett's band often skips the intro and I think like Genesis it is long and I think it was more a time saving measure in a long live concert rather than a difficult thing to play---Lamb Lies down Intro is also difficult but he always played it live---


Posted By: Snow Dog
Date Posted: June 02 2013 at 08:40
Originally posted by infocat infocat wrote:

Originally posted by rogerthat rogerthat wrote:

Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:


Originally posted by NickHall NickHall wrote:

Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.

I've read that Genesis used to skip the piano intro of "Firth of Fifth" because Banks couldn't play it live. I don't know whether this is true or not, although I doubt it as the keyboard player from tribute band Los Endos has no trouble playing it.
Wakeman is technically better but doesn't always pick the best keyboard sounds.
I'm going to go for Wakeman for the glorious church organ section of "Close To The Edge" and the instrumental section of "And You And I".


I had read something similar about the intro to Firth of Fifth... but I think it had more to do with him not being able to find the right sound on his keyboards in order to play that, though I'm not really sure.


I doubt it's because he couldn't play it because he always played the interlude anyway, which is a repetition of the intro.  Yeah, it's probably the tone or something like that. 
I also heard it was the tone.

Slightly disappointed not to hear the intro at a recent Hackett show.  And I know Roger King can play it, because I've seen it on a Hackett video.

They played the intro when I saw them a few weeks ago.Big smile


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http://www.last.fm/user/Snow_Dog" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: VOTOMS
Date Posted: June 02 2013 at 09:24
Banks!

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https://esmectatons.bandcamp.com/album/deformidade-jovial-e-outras-hist-rias/" rel="nofollow - ESMECTATONS IS YOUR FAVORITE BAND


Posted By: The Dark Elf
Date Posted: June 04 2013 at 04:48
Wakeman. Because of the capes.


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...a vigorous circular motion hitherto unknown to the people of this area, but destined
to take the place of the mud shark in your mythology...


Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: June 04 2013 at 06:04
Of course, Wakeman was an incredibly ambitious individual who created such an incredibly over-the-top work as 'Journey To The Centre Of The Earth'.  It would never have worked without the over-blown pomposity.  This is the very essence of Prog which, a) summed it all up, and b) gave it a bad name........Confused.  Rick nailed it, either way and both ways.  Too much talent can be friend or foe..................


Posted By: jacek1969
Date Posted: June 11 2013 at 11:20
Rick Wakeman

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Call any vegetable
And the chances are good
That a vegetable will respond to you


Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: June 11 2013 at 19:50
More folks need to discover Rick's 'Silent Nights' album - such an overlooked and underappreciated album - on the surface it's poppy, but below shows a certain mastery of blending accessibility with prog chops and subtle complexities.  It also features one of the better vocalists (Gordon Neville) to grace a Wakeman album Thumbs Up


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: June 11 2013 at 22:51
Originally posted by Tom Ozric Tom Ozric wrote:

More folks need to discover Rick's 'Silent Nights' album - such an overlooked and underappreciated album - on the surface it's poppy, but below shows a certain mastery of blending accessibility with prog chops and subtle complexities.  It also features one of the better vocalists (Gordon Neville) to grace a Wakeman album Thumbs Up


Cool Tom. Sounds really interesting. Loving keyboardist solo projects lately.

Love Micheal Pinella's solo work from symphony x. Oh and just recently purchased Clive Nolan's ALCHEMY album. Look forward to getting that one.

Actually. Come to think of it. I'd choose Clive Nolan over Wakemen and Banks. :)

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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: Fox On The Rocks
Date Posted: June 11 2013 at 23:17
Banks by far. He was all about style and selective playing, something Wakeman could never do. To be quite honest, Wakeman's style is just way too over the top, at least for me anyways. Mind you, I haven't listened to these guys in such a long time, my tastes have changed, so probably my opinion has too.


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Posted By: Dr. Occulator
Date Posted: June 12 2013 at 17:30
I enjoy both keyboardists immensely. They each have their own definitive style and have contributed greatly to progressive rock. My vote goes to Wakeman because I feel though both are musical equals, Wakeman generated a showmanship that  epitomized the grandeur and maybe over indulgence of prog. He was much more of an ambassador for prog than Banks ever was. Most people would not even recognize a picture of Banks but few prog fans or general music lovers would not recognize the man with the long blond hair and flowing cape. The image & musicality Wakeman brought was 'instrumental' (pun intended) in bringing prog to the uninitiated.

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My Doc Told Me I Have Doggie Head.


Posted By: DiamondDog
Date Posted: June 14 2013 at 04:12
Again a contest of taste versus technique; though Rick can be tasteful too at times. Rick for me.


Posted By: Green Shield Stamp
Date Posted: June 14 2013 at 15:54
Rick Wakeman.  His vast solo collection, albeit patchy, contains some real gems.  Also he is a great bloke whereas Tony Banks is a bit pompous.

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Haiku

Writing a poem
With seventeen syllables
Is very diffic....


Posted By: brainstormer
Date Posted: June 14 2013 at 19:15
Rick Wakeman is a big celebrity in the UK for non-musical things..  That's a pretty unique position among proggers. Can you think of any others?   I wonder in the non-English European countries....I think maybe someone in France is also like that that was also from prog. 

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--
Robert Pearson
Regenerative Music http://www.regenerativemusic.net
Telical Books http://www.telicalbooks.com
ParaMind Brainstorming Software http://www.paramind.net




Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: June 14 2013 at 19:38
Originally posted by brainstormer brainstormer wrote:

Rick Wakeman is a big celebrity in the UK for non-musical things..  That's a pretty unique position among proggers. Can you think of any others?   I wonder in the non-English European countries....I think maybe someone in France is also like that that was also from prog. 

What kind of things does Rick do on TV there?


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https://wytchcrypt.wixsite.com/mutiny-in-jonestown" rel="nofollow - Mutiny in Jonestown : Progressive Rock Since 1987


Posted By: brainstormer
Date Posted: June 14 2013 at 19:44
He's done a cooking show, stand up comedy, was part of a team called Grumpy Old Men,
I'm not sure of all of it because unfortunately haven't spent much time there.  


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--
Robert Pearson
Regenerative Music http://www.regenerativemusic.net
Telical Books http://www.telicalbooks.com
ParaMind Brainstorming Software http://www.paramind.net




Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: June 14 2013 at 20:11
Originally posted by brainstormer brainstormer wrote:

He's done a cooking show, stand up comedy, was part of a team called Grumpy Old Men,

This doesn't surprise me...anyone who can eat Chinese takeout while performing "Tales From Topographic Oceans" has a bright future in stand up comedy LOL


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https://wytchcrypt.wixsite.com/mutiny-in-jonestown" rel="nofollow - Mutiny in Jonestown : Progressive Rock Since 1987


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: June 15 2013 at 10:42
Rick's also on the BBC programme Watchdog which is a consumer affairs show. He doesn't present it though just does the occasional outside report. He also had his own show on Planet Rock radio but that finished about a year or so ago.


Posted By: Gerinski
Date Posted: June 15 2013 at 12:24
Originally posted by Dellinger Dellinger wrote:

Originally posted by chopper chopper wrote:


Originally posted by NickHall NickHall wrote:

Wakeman way ahead of Banks in technical ability.

I've read that Genesis used to skip the piano intro of "Firth of Fifth" because Banks couldn't play it live. I don't know whether this is true or not, although I doubt it as the keyboard player from tribute band Los Endos has no trouble playing it.
Wakeman is technically better but doesn't always pick the best keyboard sounds.
I'm going to go for Wakeman for the glorious church organ section of "Close To The Edge" and the instrumental section of "And You And I".


I had read something similar about the intro to Firth of Fifth... but I think it had more to do with him not being able to find the right sound on his keyboards in order to play that, though I'm not really sure.
I have read that originally he played the intro but it was eventually dropped (although I have not heard any live version with it). I believe that he could play it, he has some other technically difficult passages in their usual repertoire and he never seems to be sloppy, I guess it was more a matter of time-saving or because he did not like the sound of it on electric piano (although this argument was only valid in the 70's / 80's until good synths / samplers started to produce decent grand piano emulations).

"Banks would not take his entire rig with him on tour, but did take most of it. Taking a grand piano on tour was not practical, so those parts on the albums were played on the electric piano. (Before it was dropped, for example, the "Firth of Fifth" intro was played on the electric piano.)"

http://genesislive.ning.com/group/equipment/forum/topics/1982628:Topic:36382" rel="nofollow - http://genesislive.ning.com/group/equipment/forum/topics/1982628:Topic:36382



Posted By: Gerinski
Date Posted: June 15 2013 at 12:38
I'l go for the best of both worlds, Rick Banksman LOL




Posted By: The.Crimson.King
Date Posted: June 15 2013 at 19:17
Originally posted by Gerinski Gerinski wrote:

I'l go for the best of both worlds, Rick Banksman LOL



A fascinating thought...Tony Banks compositional mind with Rick Wakeman's dexterity.


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https://wytchcrypt.wixsite.com/mutiny-in-jonestown" rel="nofollow - Mutiny in Jonestown : Progressive Rock Since 1987


Posted By: progbethyname
Date Posted: June 15 2013 at 19:44
Hey. This could work. ^

Rick banksman.

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Raving and drooling I leaned on his neck with a screeeeeeeamm! ;)


Posted By: richardh
Date Posted: June 16 2013 at 05:49
Originally posted by The.Crimson.King The.Crimson.King wrote:

Originally posted by Gerinski Gerinski wrote:

I'l go for the best of both worlds, Rick Banksman LOL



A fascinating thought...Tony Banks compositional mind with Rick Wakeman's dexterity.

as long as its that way round

reminds me of Tony Curtis explaining that he was glad that his daughter Jamie - Lee had inherited his brains and his mothers looksTongue


Posted By: Trane
Date Posted: July 10 2013 at 18:22
Hands down it's Wakeman. While Banks has made extraordinary contributions to great pieces of work, he's lazy. Never pushed boundaries nor exposed us to more than being a keyboard player in a band. Quite a disappointment.  


Posted By: maani
Date Posted: July 10 2013 at 18:29
I didn't vote (I'm completely torn here), but I am both amazed and encouraged to see that, as of this writing, they are tied. They (and, of course, Emerson) were both so critical to the success of progressive music.

Peace.


Posted By: Earthmover
Date Posted: July 10 2013 at 21:41
Are we doing these polls annually or what?

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http://www.last.fm/user/Bequeathed" rel="nofollow">


Posted By: AngleofRepose
Date Posted: July 17 2013 at 06:06
^^ ha, yeah. I've seen this poll more than a few times. i still seem to be voting though...


Posted By: Josef_K
Date Posted: July 17 2013 at 06:41
Originally posted by Trane Trane wrote:

Hands down it's Wakeman. While Banks has made extraordinary contributions to great pieces of work, he's lazy. Never pushed boundaries nor exposed us to more than being a keyboard player in a band. Quite a disappointment.  
 
You do know he's also writing for orchestras and stuff right? Not that I've heard those albums, but they do exist, he is most certainly more than a keyboard player in a band :D


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Leave the past to burn,
At least that's been his own

- Peter Hammill


Posted By: Codera the Great
Date Posted: October 21 2013 at 10:41
Both Rick Wakeman and Tony Banks are superb for the work they did with Yes and Genesis, but I'd give the slight edge to Rick Wakeman, because I like his solo work more than Tony Banks'.


Posted By: Hana
Date Posted: April 03 2014 at 10:07
Rick Wakeman is too much "baroque" for me and archaic on some level. And (dont kill me) - boring.
Tony always has a imaginative structure of harmony and beautiful melodies. I vote for Tony!


Posted By: Rick Robson
Date Posted: April 03 2014 at 10:40
Originally posted by brainstormer brainstormer wrote:

I find Banks interesting and able to create some beautiful melodies but his music doesn't have the power for me of Wakeman's.   Esp Six Wives and Criminal Record, and Rick's contributions to Yes are pretty much all his own, I'm sure.   I find many other treasures also in Wakeman's solo output.   Not sure how much of the piano writing itself of Morning Has Broken was original from Rick, but that's a pretty major achievement, as well.  

 
Morning Has Broken - What a beautiful song!
And Rick has really superb songs and albums, he is also a great composer. I can't vote because i don't know yet Banks solo works.


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"Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy." LvB


Posted By: ebil0505
Date Posted: April 03 2014 at 11:18
A month ago I would've said Wakeman, but I can't argue with The Cinema Show He's the most melodious keyboardist I know of; each solo (at least with Genesis) is so unique to the respective song it always fits perfectly, especially The Colony of Slippermen.

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"I like to think oysters transcend national barriers." - Roger Waters


Posted By: Ivan_Melgar_M
Date Posted: April 03 2014 at 11:58
Soloist: Rick Wakeman
Band member: Tony Banks

Composer: Rick Wakeman
Performer: Both in their styles


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Posted By: twosteves
Date Posted: April 03 2014 at 12:03
Tony is the best all round prog keyboardist---he has no cheesy sounds , as a matter of fact he heas the best synth sounds in the business---and his playing is sublime---either as lead or as carrying the whole song.


Posted By: Tom Ozric
Date Posted: April 03 2014 at 13:38
Originally posted by brainstormer brainstormer wrote:


Rick Wakeman is a big celebrity in the UK for non-musical things..  That's a pretty unique position among proggers. <span style="line-height: 1.2;">Can you think of any others?   I wonder in the non-English European countries....I think maybe </span><span style="line-height: 1.2;">someone in France is also like that that was also from prog. </span>
We often forget Phil 'Buster' Collins - to see him playing the part of a train robber, and knowing the incredible drumming he's contributed to countless albums and artists is plain amusing. Rick is master comedian though. An eccentric genius !!!


Posted By: giselle
Date Posted: April 03 2014 at 16:54
Is this a put-on? I'm not a huge fan of Rick Wakeman, but he is, at the very least, one of the outstanding keyboard players of the Rock era, whereas Tony Banks is a fine sideman, a good pro. Not a fair or sensible comparison. 



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