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Glass Hammer - The Inconsolable Secret CD (album) cover

THE INCONSOLABLE SECRET

Glass Hammer

 

Symphonic Prog

3.40 | 194 ratings

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Evolver
Special Collaborator
Crossover & JR/F/Canterbury Teams
4 stars Glass Hammer, often accused of being a Yes imitation (sometimes with good reason), reached for the stars with this double album. It may be an indication of their ambition that they hired the legendary Roger Dean to create the album cover.

While a bit inconsistent, I think they succeeded here.

The album is split into two parts. The first disk, titled "The Knights", is the better of the two. It is comprised of two long pieces. The Maker Of Crowns is a majestic song, with hints, but not imitation of classic Genesis. It works well as an opener to the album. The second, The Knight Of The North, has some Yes tones, some Keith Emerson inspired Hammond organ, and even some hints of Kansas. But Glass Hammer's own style comes through on top. It may be the best track this band had recorded to this point.

The second album, titled "The Lady", is mostly more subdued. The styles jump from medieval to classical orchestral to prog folk and symphonic prog. While the songs are not as good as the epics on the first disk, they are not bad, and the production is spectacular. And Mog Ruith does stand out on this disk.

Evolver | 4/5 |

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